Ilya Rashkovskiy

Ilya Rashkovskiy
Ilya Rashkovskiy (b. 1984), pianist

Monday, November 20, 2017

Ilya Rashkovskiy plays Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninov, Liszt, Tchaikovsky & Chopin – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 1
















The International Tchaikovsky Competition, first held more than 50 years ago, is not only a valuable asset of Russian musical culture but is also one of the major events in the international music community. The International Tchaikovsky Competition is held once every four years.

The first, in 1958, included two disciplines – piano and violin. Beginning with the second competition, in 1962, a cello category was added, and the vocal division was introduced during the third competition in 1966. In 1990, a fifth discipline was announced for the IX International Tchaikovsky Competition – a contest for violin makers which was held before the main competition.


The XV International Tchaikovsky Competition was held in Moscow and St Petersburg from June 15 to July 3, 2015, and was dedicated to the 175th anniversary of the great Russian composer.


In the competition participated more than 600 artists from 45 countries.


On the jury for piano was the distinguished pianists Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, and the founder and director of the Verbier International Festival and Academy, Martin Engström.











Ο 15ος Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος ήταν αφιερωμένος στην 175η επέτειο από τη γέννηση του μεγάλου Ρώσου συνθέτη, πραγματοποιήθηκε στη Μόσχα και στην Αγία Πετρούπολη από τις 15 Ιουνίου έως τις 3 Ιουλίου 2015.

Στο πλαίσιο του πρώτου γύρου του διαγωνισμού στην κατηγορία του πιάνου, ο Ρώσος πιανίστας Ilya Rashkovskiy (γενν. 1984), ερμήνευσε το Πρελούδιο και Φούγκα αρ. 8 σε Μι ύφεση ελάσσονα, από το πρώτο βιβλίο του «Καλοσυγκερασμένου Κλειδοκύμβαλου», BWV 853, του Γιόχαν Σεμπάστιαν Μπαχ, τη Σονάτα για πιάνο αρ. 32 σε Ντο ελάσσονα, έργο 111, του Λούντβιχ βαν Μπετόβεν, τη Σπουδή αρ. 2 σε Ντο μείζονα, από τις Études-tableaux, έργο 33, του Σεργκέι Ραχμάνινοφ, τη δωδέκατη Σπουδή σε Σι δίεση ελάσσονα από τις δώδεκα Transcendental Études, S.139, του Φραντς Λιστ, το τέταρτο κομμάτι, "April: Snowdrop", σε Σι ύφεση μείζονα, από τις Εποχές, έργο 37, του Πιότρ Ιλίτς Τσαϊκόφσκι, και τη Σπουδή αρ. 12 σε Ντο ελάσσονα, του έργου 25, του Φρεντερίκ Σοπέν.

Το ρεσιτάλ έλαβε χώρα στη Μεγάλη Αίθουσα του Ωδείου της Μόσχας, στις 18 Ιουνίου 2015.

Ο Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος πραγματοποιείται κάθε τέσσερα χρόνια, είναι ίσως ο σημαντικότερος διαγωνισμός στο χώρο της κλασικής μουσικής. Ο διαγωνισμός διοργανώθηκε για πρώτη φορά το 1958, περιλαμβάνοντας μόνο δύο κατηγορίες: του βιολιού και του πιάνου. Το 1962, στη δεύτερη διοργάνωση, προστέθηκε η κατηγορία του βιολοντσέλου, ενώ στην τρίτη διοργάνωση του διαγωνισμού, το 1966, προστέθηκε ακόμη η κατηγορία της φωνής.

Στον 15ο Διαγωνισμό, το 2015, συμμετείχαν περισσότεροι από εξακόσιοι καλλιτέχνες από 45 χώρες, οι οποίοι διαγωνίστηκαν και στις τέσσερεις κατηγορίες: πιάνο, βιολί, βιολοντσέλο και φωνή.

Την κριτική επιτροπή για την κατηγορία του πιάνου αποτελούσαν οι διακεκριμένοι πιανίστες Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, καθώς επίσης και ο Martin Engström, ιδρυτής και διευθυντής του Διεθνούς Φεστιβάλ και της Ακαδημίας του Βερμπιέρ.



XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 1

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

 The Well-Tempered Clavier I / Das Wohltemperierte Klavier I, BWV 846-869 (1722)* [00:00]**

viii. Prelude and Fugue in E flat minor, BWV 853


Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Piano Sonata No.32 in C minor, Op.111 (1821-1822) [10:07]

i. Maestoso – Allegro con brio ed appassionato
ii. Arietta: Adagio molto, semplice e cantabile


Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)

♪ Études-tableaux, Op.33 No.2 in C major (1911) [35:38]


Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

♪ The Transcendental Études for Piano, S.139 No.12 in B flat minor "Chasse-neige" (1851) [38:08]


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)

♪ The Seasons, for piano, Op.37 (1875-1876) [43:36]

iv. April (Snowdrop). Allegretto con moto e un poco rubato in B flat major


Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)

♪ Études, Op.25 No.12 in C minor (1832-1836) [46:02]


Ilya Rashkovskiy, piano

Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, June 18, 2015

(HD 720p)


The Well-Tempered Clavier, by Johann Sebastian Bach, consists of two books of twenty-four Preludes and Fugues each, in all twenty-four major and minor keys. The first book (BWV 846-869) dates back to 1722, although Bach revised his manuscript thereafter. The second book (BWV 870-893) was composed in 1744.

The pianists competing at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition must perform, during the first round of the Competition, one Prelude and one Fugue from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier.



* «Το Καλοσυγκερασμένο Κλειδοκύμβαλο» (γερμανικά: Das Wohltemperierte Klavier) είναι μία συλλογή δύο βιβλίων του Γιόχαν Σεμπάστιαν Μπαχ για πληκτροφόρο όργανο. Κάθε βιβλίο περιλαμβάνει 24 δυάδες ενός Πρελούδιου και μιας Φούγκας γραμμένων σε κάθε μία από τις 24 τονικότητες. Το πρώτο βιβλίο (BWV 846-869) χρονολογείται στο 1722, αν και στη συνέχεια ο Μπαχ αναθεωρήθηκε το χειρόγραφό του, και το δεύτερο (BWV 870-893) στο 1742.

Οι πιανίστες οι οποίοι διαγωνίστηκαν στον 15ο Διεθνή Διαγωνισμό Τσαϊκόφσκι έπρεπε στη διάρκεια του πρώτου γύρου να ερμηνεύσουν μία δυάδα ενός Πρελούδιου και μιας Φούγκας από «Το Καλοσυγκερασμένο Κλειδοκύμβαλο» του Μπαχ.



** Start time of each work


















Ilya Rashkovskiy (b. 1984, Irkutsk, Russia) is the first prize winner of the following competitions: the Hamamatsu International Piano Competition (first prize and Public Prize, Japan, 2012), the Citta di Pinerolo Competition (Italy, 2012), the International Jaen Competition (Spain, 2005), and at the Hong Kong International Competition (2005). He is among the top prize winners of the Long – J. Thibaud Competition in Paris (2nd Place), Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels (4th Place) and Artur Rubinstein Piano Masters in Tel Aviv (3rd Place).

When he was only five years old, Ilya Rashkovskiy began to play piano. A year later, he began to compose. At the age of eight, he gave his first concert with the Irkusk Chamber Orchestra. From 1993 to 2000 he studied at the Novosibirsk State Conservatory with Professor Mary Lebenzon. From 2000 to 2009 he studied at the Musikhochschule in Hannover with Professor Vladimir Krainev and finally at the École Normale Supérieure Alfred Cortot in Paris with Professor Marian Rybicki.

Passionate about orchestra conducting and composition, he followed the teachings of Dominique Rouits and Michel Merlet.

Ilya performed in several prestigious concert venues throughout the world, such as the Théatre du Châtelet, the Salle Playel, the Cologne Philharmonic Hall, the Essen Philharmonic Hall, the Royal Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Grand Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, the Suntory Hall in Tokyo. He was invited to perform at the Joy of Music Festival in Hong Kong, the International Piano Festival in La Roque d'Anthéron and the International Chopin Festival in Duszniki-Zdroj (Poland).

He collaborated as a soloist with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, the Orchestre national de Lille, the Gulbenkian Orchestra, the National Orchestra of Belgium, the Maastricht Symphony Orchestra, the Czech National Symphony Orchestra, the Romanian National Orchestra, the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, the New Japan Symphony Orchestra, the State Academic Orchestra of the Russian Federation, the National Philharmonic of Ukraine and the Montevideo Symphony Orchestra among many others.

In 2016, he gave several concerts in Russia, notably with the Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra in Saint Petersburg. He also participated in the gala concert organized as a tribute to Sergei Prokofiev at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall of the Moscow State Philharmonic Society. Furthermore, he recently performed at the Verdi Hall in Milan as well as the Salle Gaveau in Paris.

Ilya Rashkovskiy is a great chamber music admirer and he gladly shares the stages with violinists such as Ji-Yoon Park, Valeriy Sokolov and Andrej Bielow. He also collaborates with singers such as Brigitte Balleys and Orianne Moretti.

He is also actively engaged in fostering younger talents and has given master classes on several occasions in Hong Kong, New Zealand and France. He has been invited as a judge at International Piano Competition Animato for last three editions in Paris.

His last CD with the works of Russian composers (Mussorgsky, Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky) was released in October 2016 (La Musica, France). In 2015, he recorded A. Scriabin's complete piano sonatas in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of composers's death (NAR, Japan). He also recorded the Seasons and Sonata in C sharp minor by Tchaikovsky (Naxos Label, 2008), Fantasies by Mozart, Chopin, Liszt and Scriabin (Alpha Omega Music Hong Kong, 2009), as well as Chopin's Complete Études in 2013 (Victor Japan).

Source: ilyarashkovskiy.com

















More photos


See also


The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015










Friday, November 17, 2017

Richard Strauss: Don Juan, & Burleske in D minor for piano and orchestra | Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.2 in D major – Bertrand Chamayou, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Fabien Gabel – Sunday, November 19, 2017, 03:00 PM EST (UTC-5) / 10:00 PM EET (UTC+2) – Live on Livestream

Bertrand Chamayou (Photo by Marco Borggreve)
















Under the baton of the talented French conductor Fabien Gabel, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra performs Richard Strauss' Don Juan, Op.20, and – with the French virtuoso pianist Bertrand Chamayou – Burleske in D minor for piano and orchestra, TrV 145, and Johannes Brahms' Symphony No.2 in D major, Op.73.

From its opening flourish, Strauss' Don Juan takes you on the legendary lover's adventures, until he ultimately faces the consequences of his promiscuity. The 24-year-old Strauss rose to international fame with this work, but didn't receive the approval of one of his early idols, the 19th Century master Johannes Brahms. To Brahms the new sound was pure indulgence, and honored the genius of past greats with a more traditional style embodied in his Second Symphony.

Sunday, November 19
Los Angeles: 02:00 PM
Detroit, New York, Toronto: 03:00 PM
London: 08:00 PM
Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Madrid, Rome: 09:00 PM
Kiev, Jerusalem, Athens: 10:00 PM
Moscow: 11:00 PM

Monday, November 20
Beijing: 05:00 AM
Tokyo: 06:00 AM

Find in my time zone

Live on Livestream



Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

♪ Don Juan, Op.20 (1888)

♪ Burleske in D minor for piano and orchestra, TrV 145 (1885-1886)

Bertrand Chamayou, piano


Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

♪ Symphony No.2 in D major, Op.73 (1877)

i. Allegro non troppo
ii. Adagio non troppo
iii. Allegretto grazioso
iv. Allegro con spirito


Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Fabien Gabel

(HD 720p)

Live from Orchestra Hall, Max M. Fisher Music Center, Detroit

Sunday, November 19, 2017, 03:00 PM EST (UTC-5) / 10:00 PM EET (UTC+2)

Live on Livestream


Bertrand Chamayou (b. 1981, Toulouse) has mastered an extensive repertoire displaying striking assurance, imagination, artistic approach and remarkable consistency in his performances. He is a regular performer in venues such as the Théâtre des Champs Elysées, Lincoln Center, the Herkulessaal Munich and London's Wigmore Hall. He has appeared at major festivals including New York's Mostly Mozart Festival, the Lucerne Festival, Edinburgh International Festival, Rheingau Musik Festival, Beethovenfest Bonn and Klavier-Festival Ruhr.

The 2017-2018 season will see him make his debuts with New York Philharmonic under Semyon Bychkov, Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, Bamberger Symphoniker, Staatskapelle Berlin, Atlanta Symphony, Orchestre symphonique de Québec and Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Further highlights include his return to Orchestre National de Belgique, Orquesta Nacional de España, Orchestre de Paris and Orchestre National de France. He will perform as soloist on tour in South Africa with the Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse.

Chamayou is a regular chamber music performer, with partners including Renaud and Gautier Capuçon, Quatuor Ebène, Antoine Tamestit and Sol Gabetta. The pianist will open the season at London's International Piano Series and perform in recitals at Wigmore Hall, Kissinger Sommer, Lakeside Arts Center Nottingham, in Monte Carlo, Vilnius, Essen, at Salzburg's Easter Festival and Great Performers series at Lincoln Center, New York.

Bertrand Chamayou has made a number of highly successful recordings, including a Naïve CD of music by César Franck, which was awarded several accolades including Gramophone's Editor's Choice. In 2011, Chamayou celebrated Liszt's 200th anniversary with a recording of the complete "Années de Pèlerinage" – also for Naïve – which he performed in several venues throughout the world. The album received rave reviews worldwide – including Gramophone Choice. The only artist to win France's prestigious Victoires de la Musique on four occasions he has an exclusive recording contract with Warner/Erato and was awarded the 2016 ECHO Klassik for his recording of Ravel's complete works for solo piano.

Source: harrisonparrott.com


















Recognized internationally as one of the stars of the new generation, Fabien Gabel is a regular guest of major orchestras in Europe, North America and Asia. He has been music director of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra since September 2013, and was recently appointed music director of the Orchestre Français des Jeunes (French Youth Orchestra).

Following a highly-anticipated debut with the Cleveland Orchestra, Fabien embarks on an exciting 2017-2018 season that will take him across the United States and Europe, including high-profile performances with the National Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Frankfurt's Hessischer Rundfunk Orchester and the Orchestre de Paris. Additional American appearances include performances with the Houston Symphony Orchestra, Milwaukee Symphony, and the San Diego Symphony. After an acclaimed debut with the Deutsches Sinfonie Orchestra last season, Gabel's European engagements will again feature concerts throughout Germany (Staatskapelle Weimar in addition to Frankfurt), and welcome returns to the Orchestre de Paris, Helsinki Philharmonic, Antwerp Philharmonic and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.

Gabel has conducted leading orchestras around the world, including the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre de Paris, the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester in Hamburg, the DSO Berlin, Staatskappelle Dresden, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Oslo Philharmonic, Orchestra dell'Accademia Santa Cecilia di Roma, and the Seoul Philharmonic, among others.

His rapidly-expanding U.S. presence has seen him leading the Cleveland Orchestra, Houston Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, San Diego Symphony Orchestra and more.

Fabien Gabel has worked with soloists like Emmanuel Ax, Gidon Cremer, Christian Tetzlaff, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Julian Steckel, Johannes Moser, Antonio Meneses, Marc-André Hamelin, Beatrice Rana, Gautier Capuçon, and Simone Lamsma, or singers like Jennifer Larmore, Measha Bruggergosman, Danielle de Niese, Natalie Dessay, and Marie- Nicole Lemieux.

Fabien had first attracted international attention in 2004 winning the Donatella Flick competition in London, which subsequently led to his appointment as the LSO's assistant conductor for the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 seasons. Since then, the LSO has engaged him regularly as a guest conductor.

He made his professional conducting debut in 2003 with the Orchestre National de France and has since returned frequently.  He now regularly conducts this orchestra in subscription concerts at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris and recently recorded a French opera aria CD with them and mezzo Marie-Nicole Lemieux (Naïve).

Born in Paris in 1975 and a member of a family of accomplished musicians, Fabien Gabel began studying trumpet at the age of six, honing his skills at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris, which awarded him a First Prize in trumpet in 1996, and later at the Musik Hochschule of Karlsruhe. He went on to play in various Parisian orchestras under the direction of prominent conductors such as Pierre Boulez, Sir Colin Davis, Riccardo Muti, Seiji Ozawa, Simon Rattle and Bernard Haitink. In 2002 Fabien Gabel pursued his interest in conducting at the Aspen Summer Music Festival, where he studied with David Zinman, who invited him to appear as a guest conductor at the Festival in 2009. He has worked with Bernard Haitink and Sir Colin Davis as their assistant.

Source: fabiengabel.com


Bertrand Chamayou (Photo by Marco Borggreve)


















Richard Strauss: Don Juan, Op.20

Don Juan (1888) stands out among Strauss' early tone poems for its almost perfect structure and concise design. Taking Nikolaus Lenau's fragmentary play of the same title as his starting point, Strauss fashioned a tone poem which would convey the story of the legendary inveterate womanizer. The connection with Lenau's version of the story is confirmed by the quotation of text as an incipit in the score.

Strauss quickly captures the impetuous nature of Don Juan in the soaring theme which opens the piece. While Strauss did not allow a narrative description to be printed at the premiere (as was then often the case with program music), the story is easy enough to follow. Taking the more lyrical sections as depictions of various women, one after another, one hears the exuberant opening theme that occurs between them, and which opens the work, as Don Juan's own. This theme intensifies and becomes more ardent throughout until, near the end, it dissolves into the stormy music associated with the Commendatore, the father of a woman Don Juan had seduced. As in Mozart's similarly themed opera Don Giovanni (1787), the Don meets his end at the hands of the Commendatore. In Strauss' treament, however, the spirit of Don Juan emerges even after his defeat.

Strauss himself conducted the premiere of the work in fall 1889, and it was well received from the start. In its exceedingly vivid orchestration, use of short motives, and intense lyricism, Don Juan provides a striking and enduring encapsulation of Strauss' musical language.

Source: James Zychowicz (allmusic.com)



Richard Strauss: Burleske in D minor for piano and orchestra, TrV 145

Two of the many stylistic personae of Richard Strauss are represented in this program: the first, chronologically, is exemplified by the Burleske (1885), the creation of an ardent young Brahmsian, his sensibilities shielded by his horn-player father, Franz, from the Wagner-Liszt "plague". However, Strauss would soon succumb to that very plague which his father most feared, beginning with Don Juan (1888) and reaching a peak of sensationalism and inventiveness with Ein Heldenleben - A Hero's Life (1898).

Burleske had its origins in Strauss' apprenticeship with the conductor Hans von Bülow in Meiningen, which took up the first half of 1885. The composer intended the solo for Bülow, who was equally renowned as a pianist. Its putative dedicatee, however, considered it too unconventional stylistically – and unmanageable by his small hands. Another stellar pianist of the time, Eugen d'Albert, was more favorably disposed and manually endowed. He accepted its dedication, introducing the piece to the public at a 1890 music festival in Eisenach, with Strauss conducting. Ironically, by that time Strauss had already expunged the Brahmsian influence from his musical thinking: the premiere of the futuristic Don Juan had, in fact taken place in November of 1889, several months before that of the Burleske.

That there should be a Brahmsian flavor to the Burleske should come as no surprise. Brahms was a frequent visitor to Meiningen, given his friendship with Bülow and that its orchestra was one of Europe's finest. The one time Strauss and Brahms did, in fact, meet was in Meiningen, in 1885.

The Burleske is in a single sonata-allegro movement. The timpani solo, the attention-grabbing inspiration with which the piece begins, is followed by a syncopated theme in parallel thirds that is purest Brahms. But the burgeoning Strauss is detectable as well, here and throughout – in the score's nervous energy, terse rhythms, and, most notably, in its wide melodic leaps.

Source: Herbert Glass (laphil.com)



Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.2 in D major, Op.73

Johannes Brahms composed his Symphony No.2 in the summer of 1877, less than a year after the premiere of his Symphony No.1 – an astonishing fact given that the former had taken him fifteen years to complete. Finally confident in his abilities as a symphonist, and less troubled by the looming shadow of Beethoven, Brahms created a much more spontaneous work that was well received by both critics and audiences. When compared with the works of his contemporaries, this piece is conservative in both orchestration and formal structure. But it is by no means reactionary. Rather, Brahms revised and expanded upon the eighteenth century model, largely replacing thematic contrast with transformation and variation, and adding his distinctive richness of harmony and rhythm.

There is both unity and variety in this symphony: Brahms manages to combine the light and dark, the lyrical and forceful, the extroverted and introspective – all the while growing the piece organically from the "seed" of the very first three notes (D-C sharp-D, heard in the cellos and the double basses). This compositional economy is instinctively apparent to the ear, and helps to make the entire work intelligible without sacrificing interest or spontaneity.

Brahms's orchestration is full, rich, and often ingenious. He chooses to make the ensemble one unified voice, and has introduced his entire spectrum of instrumental colors after only 40 bars; however, one never gets the sense that he is overusing the orchestra. Instead he creates a texture in constant flux, shifting the focus of the ear, and extracting individual colors to great effect.

The piece opens with the three-note germinating cell and a simple horn melody; we are then introduced to two subjects in turn, the first announced by the violins, and the second by the cellos and violas in a luxurious duet. After developing both themes, Brahms creates an interesting recapitulation by briefly combining the initial horn melody and the first subject, and then dwelling extensively on the second subject. A short coda is attached to the end.

Two bassoons color the second movement's opening cello theme with a dark counterpoint, creating an immediate contrast to the first movement. It is here that we begin to see the more introspective side of Brahms, although this is by no means a brooding movement; there a surprising variety of expression within the slow prevailing tempo.

With the third movement, Brahms for the first time departs from a string-dominated texture, and allows a solo oboe to introduce the opening theme, while pizzicato cellos and a woodwind choir provide accompaniment. Full of rhythmic interest, this movement has frequent meter changes, expectant fermatas, and Brahms' distinctive cross-rhythms.

The moody and unpredictable finale oscillates between manic energy and somberness; Brahms is constantly changing direction, sometimes so abruptly as to pull the rug out from beneath your feet. The motion never stops, and when the final D major fanfare arrives, one has the sense of having been on a wild ride.

Source: Allen Schrott (allmusic.com)












See also

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.2 in D major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, David Afkham

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.2 in D major – Gewandhausorchester, Kurt Masur (HD 1080p)

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Dmitri Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor – Leonidas Kavakos, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jakub Hrůša














Greek violin soloist Leonidas Kavakos performing Dmitri Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, Op.77, with Czech Philharmonic Orchestra under Czech conductor Jakub Hrůša. Recorded at Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall, Prague, on October 19, 2017.



As many know, Shostakovich wrote two violin concertos. But his work list suggests two separate versions of the First, the Op.77 and the Op.99. The Violin Concerto No.1 was originally completed in 1948, but withheld for seven years by the composer, owing to the oppressive climate for artists in the Soviet Union at the time. Any new work might have drawn the wrath of Stalin and his cronies in the arts. Shostakovich returned to the score in 1955 and then assigned the higher opus number to it. Actually, the only documented change he made came not as a result of second thoughts, but as a matter of consideration for the soloist. During rehearsals in 1955, the virtuoso violinist David Oistrakh requested of Shostakovich that the opening statement of the fourth movement's main theme be given to the orchestra, so that the soloist could take a rest following the long cadenza which leads right into the finale, and Shostakovich agreed to make the change.

The First Violin Concerto begins as a dark work, full of that gloom and dread that pervade so many of Shostakovich's serious works. The first movement Nocturne starts off with an ominous theme that is both inwardly reflective and filled with foreboding. Midway through, a thinly veiled Dies Irae appears as the music becomes more tense. Yet, a climactic release never quite arrives and the suggested conflicts remain unresolved.

The second movement is a rather diabolical Scherzo that contains some interesting allusions, first to the third movement of the Tenth Symphony (1953) and later to the first movement of the Second Piano Concerto (1957). The violin and woodwinds scurry about to deliver the playful yet menacing material, but gradually the character of the movement becomes more sarcastic, eventually breaking into a hallucinatory folk dance. The latter part of the Scherzo sounds less acidic, the diabolic and sarcastic elements surrender to the driving, insistent energy.

The third movement is a Passacaglia that has a chorale-like quality at the outset, as the woodwinds deliver a mournful theme. The violin enters playing the main theme, one of the composer's loveliest and warmest creations. Shostakovich's 1943 Eighth Symphony's fourth movement also featured a passacaglia, though of a decidedly grimmer character. Here, there is tension, but also much beauty. The latter third of the movement is taken up by a brilliant cadenza, which leads directly into the brief finale, a Burlesque of a mostly festive nature. The mood is similar to that of the faster music in the Tenth Symphony's finale, though there are no clear thematic references. While the work ends triumphantly, its manic qualities suggest a discomfort by the composer, as though the happy resolution might have been disingenuous.

Shostakovich eliminated trumpets and trombones from the orchestration of this Concerto, and his writing is otherwise sensitive to the limited tone of a solo violin playing amid a large ensemble. A typical performance of this work lasts about 35 minutes.

Source: Robert Cummings (allmusic.com)



Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

♪ Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, Op.77 (1947-1948)

i. Nocturne (Moderato) [00:34]*
ii. Scherzo (Allegro) [13:07]
iii. Passacaglia (Andante) [20:12]
iii(a). Cadenza
iv. Burlesque (Allegro con brio – Presto) [33:43]


Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

♪ Violin Partita No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004 (1720) [43:01]

iii. Sarabande


Leonidas Kavakos, violin

Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Jakub Hrůša

 Prague, Rudolfinum, Dvořák Hall, October 19, 2017

(HD 720p)

* Start time of each part















Leonidas Kavakos is recognised across the world as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known at the highest level for his virtuosity, superb musicianship and the integrity of his playing. He works with the world's greatest orchestras and conductors and is an exclusive artist with Decca Classics.

The three important mentors in his life have been Stelios Kafantaris, Josef Gingold and Ferenc Rados. By the age of 21, Leonidas Kavakos had already won three major competitions: the Sibelius Competition in 1985, and the Paganini and Naumburg competitions in 1988. This success led to him recording the original Sibelius Violin Concerto (1903/1904), the first recording of this work in history, and which won Gramophone Concerto of the Year Award in 1991.

Leonidas Kavakos was the winner of the Léonie Sonning Music Prize 2017. This prestigious prize is Denmark's highest musical honour and is awarded annually to an internationally recognised composer, instrumentalist, conductor or singer. Previous winners include Leonard Bernstein, Benjamin Britten, Arthur Rubinstein, Yehudi Menuhin, Dmitri Shostakovich, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Mstislav Rostropovich, Pierre Boulez, György Ligeti, Alfred Brendel, Daniel Barenboim and Sir Simon Rattle.

In the 2017-2018 season Kavakos will be Artist in Residence at both the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and the Vienna Musikverein. He will tour Europe with the Filharmonica della Scala and Chailly and tour Europe and Asia with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and Blomstedt. Elsewhere, he will perform widely as soloist including with the Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Boston Symphony Orchestra, and Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Kavakos also gives the European premiere of Lera Auerbach's Nyx: Fractured Dreams (Violin Concerto No.4) with the ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra.

In December 2017 Kavakos will embark on a European recital tour with Yuja Wang, and in February 2018 he tours North America performing Brahms and Schubert trios with Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax. He will also appear in recital with regular chamber music partner Enrico Pace in Asia and Europe.

Latterly, Leonidas Kavakos has built a strong profile as a conductor, and has conducted the London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Gürzenich Orchester, Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Filarmonica Teatro La Fenice, and Budapest Festival orchestras. In the 2017-2018 season he will conduct the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra of Europe, Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, and Vienna Symphony.

As an exclusive recording artists with Decca Classics, his first release was Beethoven Violin Sonatas with Enrico Pace (January 2013), which was awarded the ECHO Klassik "Instrumentalist of the Year". This was followed by the Brahms Violin Concerto with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and Riccardo Chailly (October 2013), Brahms Violin Sonatas with Yuja Wang (March 2014), and "Virtuoso" (April 2016). He was awarded Gramophone Artist of the Year 2014. In September 2017 Leonidas Kavakos joins Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax on a record of Brahms Trios released by Sony Classical.

Leonidas Kavakos' earlier discography encompasses recordings for BIS, ECM, and subsequently, for Sony Classical, Mendelssohn Violin Concerto (ECHO Klassik "Best Concerto Recording") and Mozart's Violin Concertos, conducting and playing with Camerata Salzburg.

Born and brought up in a musical family in Athens and still resident there, Kavakos curates an annual violin and chamber-music masterclass in Athens, attracting violinists and ensembles from all over the world and reflecting his deep commitment to the handing on of musical knowledge and traditions. Part of this tradition is the art of violin and bow-making, which Kavakos regards as a great mystery and to this day, an undisclosed secret. He plays the "Willemotte" Stradivarius violin of 1734 and owns modern violins made by F. Leonhard, S. P. Greiner, E. Haahti and D. Bagué.

Source: leonidaskavakos.com (2017)































































More photos


See also


Sergei Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No.2 in G minor – Leonidas Kavakos, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev (HD 1080p)


Sergei Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No.1 in D major – Leonidas Kavakos, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev (HD 1080p)

&

Johannes Brahms: The Violin Sonatas – Leonidas Kavakos, Yuja Wang (Audio video)

Johannes Brahms: Sonata for piano and violin No.2 in A major – Yuja Wang, Leonidas Kavakos

Maurice Ravel: Sonata for violin and piano No.1 in A minor – Leonidas Kavakos, Yuja Wang


Ottorino Respighi: Violin Sonata in B minor – Leonidas Kavakos, Yuja Wang

&

Dmitri Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor – Nicola Benedetti, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Søndergård (HD 1080p)

Dmitri Shostakovich – All the posts


Monday, November 13, 2017

Camiel Boomsma plays Frédéric Chopin & Franz Schubert – "Musings" (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)






















Did the two composers represented on this CD actually know of each other's existence? When Franz Schubert died in Vienna in 1828, the then 10-year-old Frédéric Chopin was still at the very start of his career. He had already achieved his first successes in his native country, but he was scarcely known anywhere else. In August 1829, he was making one of his first foreign trips to Vienna. Schubert had died just one year previously and, while not entirely unknown, his reputation was certainly not so great that Chopin would have been bound to hear his music during his stay in the city.

Also, while their lives were chronologically very close, they were on different sides of a musical time shift. Despite his admiration for the progressive young Beethoven, Schubert was to a large extent still under the influence of the 18th century. From the very outset of his career, however, Chopin was steeped in the Romantic movement, which he wanted to exploit to the full on the basis of his extraordinary pianistic talent.

But Camiel Boomsma has deliberately opted to juxtapose these two composers, and with good reason. "Despite the major differences in musical background, these two composers are remarkably close in spirit. The most important aspect here is their ability to create beautiful, balanced melodies on the piano. They make the instrument sing more than anyone else. This was perhaps an obvious way forward for Schubert. As the composer of more than 600 songs, the art of the song was intrinsic to his very being. But he also had the gift to translate this aspect into his instrumental music. You can hear this in his chamber music, symphonic works and of course his piano music, which is so important to me. This is immediately noticeable when listening to the themes he used in his Piano Sonata, D.960. The best way to experience this is not just to play the melodies but also actually to sing them. However, Chopin was on a par with this in his own way, since much of his music is fundamentally vocal in conception. While Schubert based his work on the German lieder, Chopin was inspired by Italian opera from the early 19th century. There – for instance in the great dramatic arias of the likes of Bellini – you can hear beautifully extended "endless" melodies that are highly romantic in nature, often accompanied by simple chord figures. I get a strong impression of the same thing in Chopin's nocturnes, certainly the early ones. They also contain long, melodic phrases in the right hand, with a simple but subtle accompaniment in the left hand."

But there are differences, too, of course. For Schubert, the piano was one of many ways in which he expressed himself musically. But he also composed a large body of work where the piano's role is either modest or non-existent, such as his string quartets, symphonies and operas. On the other hand, Chopin wrote almost exclusively for the piano. He was entirely at one with the instrument. The music he wrote for piano was in many cases a reflection of what he would play at the keyboard on a daily basis while studying or performing recitals. Playing and composing were, one might say, natural extensions of each other as far as he was concerned. Camiel Boomsma elaborates: "You feel this instantly. I get the sense of a clearly traditional approach in Schubert's music. The structure of Schubert's music, particularly the late sonatas, is almost perfect, but this is never at the expense of the melodies that were so dear to him. I get the same experience when I play his sonata. For him, technique is entirely subservient to the much more important structure and the story he is telling. He was an outstanding player, albeit not a great concert pianist, unlike Chopin, who was a true virtuoso with no technical limitations. He applied technique as a creative element in itself. You can see that he is continually seeking the limits of what he can draw from the instrument, thinking up new techniques and incorporating them in his compositions. For example, he frequently includes rapid leaps across the various registers of piano, generating a broad sound spectrum. You can find another excellent example in his Nocturne, Op.62 No.1. In this, he encapsulates the melody in a series of trills, creating a quite unique sound effect. The remarkable thing is that he never lost sight of musicality. While some of the piano giants of his day, such as the young Liszt or Thalberg, occasionally let their virtuosity descend into what could be described as pianistic circus acts, Chopin never gave in to this. This may also be one reason why he preferred to give recitals in the intimacy of a salon, where bravura was less at home than in a large concert hall. Yet another affinity he had with Schubert, who also sought the confines of a smaller room for his popular Schubertiades".

So, does Schubert need an entirely different approach than Chopin? Camiel Boomsma thinks that this is only partly the case. "Of course there are differences. Schubert demands a certain discipline. One must learn to understand his music gradually. One also needs a certain maturity for this. Chopin flows from the fingers much more directly but at the same time demands an enormous awareness of sound. He also gives the pianist a great deal of scope for interpretation, as long as the music is played with feeling. This is what I care about most, because at the end of the day this feeling is the most important factor. It remains the starting point for everything you play and, in that respect, Schubert and Chopin are not so very different."

This brings us finally to the title of the CD: Musings. "It signifies dreams, reveries, being immersed in thought. It's the process that the composer experiences while writing the work and also what I experience when studying and performing this music. As I play, I try in turn to pass on this process, this quest for insight, to my audience."

Source: CD Booklet















Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)

 Nocturne Op.9 No.1, Larghetto in B flat minor (1830-1832)
 Impromptu No.3, Op.51 (1842)
 Nocturne Op.62 No.1, Andante in B major (1845-1846)
 Nocturne Op.48 No.1, Lento in C minor (1841)


Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

♪ Piano Sonata No.21 in B flat major, D.960 (1828)

i. Molto moderato
ii. Andante sostenuto
iii. Scherzo: Allegro vivace con delicatezza
iv. Allegro ma non troppo


Camiel Boomsma, piano


Recorded at Westvest Church, Schiedam, the Netherlands, May 23 & 24, 2017

Cover photo by Juan Carlos Villarroel

Challenge Classics 2017


Interview with Camiel Boomsma about his album "Musings"



"‘Musings’ signifies dreams, reveries, being immersed in thought. It's the process that the composer experiences while writing the work and also what I experience when studying and performing this music. As I play, I try in turn to pass on this process, this quest for insight, to my audience", says Camiel Boomsma.


Download the CD from Turbobit

Link 1

(96kHz/24bit, Size: 942.23 MB)

Link 2

(44.1kHz/16bit, Size: 193.20 MB)


Source: israbox


For converting FLAC files to WAV (recommended), Apple Lossless, M4A, AAC, WMA, MP3, use the Free Studio / Free Audio Converter or xrecode II or another program.

If the links are dead,  please let us know.


Camiel Boomsma's musicianship is described by press and public as highly sensitive and profound. In his playing the emphasis lies on telling the musical story. Boomsma has performed at many major national and international venues including the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Teatro la Fenice in Venice, De Doelen concert hall in Rotterdam, De Philharmonie in Haarlem, Shanghai City Theater, Nanjing Arts Center and Chengdu Concert Hall to name a few.

Camiel Boomsma (b. 1990, Amsterdam) distinguishes himself as a pianist with a sound of his own. He aims for traditional as well as original repertoire. When preparing for a recital he likes to look beyond the piano literature's horizon and, does not avoid unusual programming. An excellent example is Boomsma's love for transcriptions, most notably those of the music of Richard Wagner.

Noteworthy concerts in 2017 and 2018 are recitals at the Klavierfestival and Wagner Festspiele in Bayreuth and The Concert series at Schloss Elmau in Krün. Furthermore there will be numerous solo recitals in the Netherlands and abroad, and duo recitals dedicated to Debussy and Wagner for 2 pianos with world renowned pianist Severin von Eckardstein.

Boomsma has received great critical acclaim for his Wagner journey. Through solo transcriptions Wagner's music becomes transparent and speaks to us in a refreshingand revealing way. His recordings for Etcetera Records, Wagner transcriptions and Porazzi, published in 2015 and 2016, received raving reviews in BBC Music magazine (5 stars), Diapason (4 stars), Trouw, NRC, De Volkskrant, Luister Magazine, Classica and many more, and have been broadcasted extensively by France Musique, radio 4, Hr2Kultur and ORF.

Boomsma has recently signed with classical music label Challenge Records International, and his 3rd album is dedicated to two composers who valued the lyricism of the piano: Franz Schubert and Frédéric Chopin. This release of this CD is October 2017.

Source: camielboomsma.com

















See also

Lucas Debargue plays Franz Schubert & Karol Szymanowski (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Dmitry Masleev – All the posts














The triumphant winner of the latest International Tchaikovsky Competition (2015), Dmitry Masleev took the First Prize and the international spotlight with wholehearted support from the audience, the jury, and the media. In his first touring season Mr. Masleev made a series of successful debuts, establishing his world-wide audience and developing his profile as a "future great pianist" (La Croix) of "virtuoso brilliance" (The Financial Times) and "musicality of metaphysical proportions" (Neue Musikzeitung ). Amongst the most notable performances are those at the Klavierfestival Ruhr, the Philharmonie am Gasteig in Munich, la Roque d'Anthéron and Bergamo & Brescia piano festivals, two tours of Japan with Valery Gergiev and Yury Bashmet, the French debut with Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse, the opening gala of the Istanbul Festival, as well as the last-minute replacement for the indisposed Maurizio Pollini in Basel.

These performances have inspired an ever-growing demand for Mr. Masleev's artistry. In January 2017, Carnegie Hall will present Mr. Masleev's highly anticipated debut at the Isaac Stern Auditorium with a recital programme featuring works by Scarlatti, Beethoven, Liszt, Rachmaninov and Prokofiev. The 2016-2017 season will also see him perform in Paris twice: at the Paris Philharmonie and the Fondation Louis Vuitton. He is honoured to return to the Philharmonie am Gasteig at Valery Gergiev's invitation to play the first three of Prokofiev's piano sonatas; later in the season he will perform in Munich once again, this time with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and the Beethoven Piano Concerto No.1. Mr. Masleev's orchestral collaborations also include a German tour with the National Philharmonic of Russia under Maestro Spivakov, an Asian tour with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France under Mikko Franck, and a performance of Rachmaninov Variations on a Theme of Paganini with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra and Robert Trevino. He will continue his tour of Germany's most prestigious festivals with recitals at Rheingau, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Bad Kissingen.

"A discovery and a brilliant pianist", is how his senior colleague Boris Berezovsky describes Dmitry Masleev, who will be performing a solo recital at the greatly acclaimed Pianoscope Festival in France, directed by Mr. Berezovsky. The two pianists will give a pair of duo recitals in Moscow later in the season, playing the music of Bartok and Liszt.

Born and raised in Ulan-Ude (a Siberian town between Lake Baikal and the Mongolian border), Dmitry Masleev was educated at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Professor Mikhail Petukhov, and at the International Music Academy at Lake Como. Prior to his triumph at the Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in Moscow, where the jury awarded him First Prize as well as a special award for the performance of the Mozart D minor Concerto, Mr. Masleev has won many competitions including the 7th Adilia Alieva Piano Competition in Gaillard (2010), the 21st Premio Chopin Piano Competition in Rome (2011), and the Antonio Napolitano Competition in Salerno (2013).

Source: dmitry-masleev.com

















Dmitry Masleev – All the posts

Dmitry Masleev plays Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, & Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.3 in C major – State Academic Symphony Orchestra "Evgeny Svetlanov", Alexey Bogorad – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Final Round

Dmitry Masleev plays Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor – Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Alexey Utkin – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, Second stage

Dmitry Masleev plays Joseph Haydn, Camille Saint-Saëns, Sergei Rachmaninov, Felix Mendelssohn & Franz Liszt – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, First stage

Dmitry Masleev plays Bach, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Chopin, Liszt & Rachmaninov – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 1


See also

George Li – All the posts

Lukas Geniušas – All the posts

Sergei Redkin – All the posts

Daniel Kharitonov – All the posts

Haik Kazazyan – All the posts


Yu-Chien Tseng – All the posts


Lucas Debargue – All the posts


The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015

Friday, November 10, 2017

Dmitry Masleev plays Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, & Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.3 in C major – State Academic Symphony Orchestra "Evgeny Svetlanov", Alexey Bogorad – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Final Round












The International Tchaikovsky Competition, first held more than 50 years ago, is not only a valuable asset of Russian musical culture but is also one of the major events in the international music community. The International Tchaikovsky Competition is held once every four years.

The first, in 1958, included two disciplines – piano and violin. Beginning with the second competition, in 1962, a cello category was added, and the vocal division was introduced during the third competition in 1966. In 1990, a fifth discipline was announced for the IX International Tchaikovsky Competition – a contest for violin makers which was held before the main competition.


The XV International Tchaikovsky Competition was held in Moscow and St Petersburg from June 15 to July 3, 2015, and was dedicated to the 175th anniversary of the great Russian composer.


In the competition participated more than 600 artists from 45 countries.


On the jury for piano was the distinguished pianists Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, and the founder and director of the Verbier International Festival and Academy, Martin Engström.


The pianists competing at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition must perform one of Tchaikovsky's two first piano concertos.




The Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, Op.23, was composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky between November 1874 and February 1875. It was revised in the summer of 1879 and again in December 1888. The first version received heavy criticism from Nikolai Rubinstein, Tchaikovsky's desired pianist. Rubinstein later repudiated his previous accusations and became a fervent champion of the work. It is one of the most popular of Tchaikovsky's compositions and among the best known of all piano concertos.


Source: en.wikipedia.org




Sergei Prokofiev began work on the Piano Concerto No.3 in C major, Op.26, as early as 1913 when he wrote a theme with variations which he then set aside. Although he revisited the sketches in 1916-1917, he did not fully devote himself to the project until 1921 when he was spending the summer in Brittany.


Prokofiev himself played the solo part at the premiere on December 16, 1921 in Chicago with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Frederick Stock. The work did not gain immediate popularity and had to wait until 1922 to be confirmed in the 20th century canon, after Serge Koussevitzky conducted a lavishly praised performance in Paris. The first Soviet performance was on March 22, 1925, by Samuil Feinberg, with the Orchestra of the Theatre of the Revolution under Konstantin Saradzhev.


en.wikipedia.org











Ο 15ος Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος ήταν αφιερωμένος στην 175η επέτειο από τη γέννηση του μεγάλου Ρώσου συνθέτη, πραγματοποιήθηκε στη Μόσχα και στην Αγία Πετρούπολη από τις 15 Ιουνίου έως τις 3 Ιουλίου 2015.

Στο πλαίσιο του τελικού του διαγωνισμού στην κατηγορία του πιάνου, ο Ρώσος πιανίστας Dmitry Masleev (γενν. 1988), ο οποίος έλαβε την πρώτη θέση, ερμήνευσε το Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο αρ. 1 σε Σι ύφεση ελάσσονα, έργο 23, του Πιότρ Ιλίτς Τσαϊκόφσκι, και το Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο αρ. 3 σε Ντο μείζονα, έργο 26, του Σεργκέι Προκόφιεφ. Τη State Academic Symphony Orchestra "Evgeny Svetlanov" διηύθυνε ο ταλαντούχος Ρώσος μαέστρος Alexey Bogorad.

Η συναυλία έλαβε χώρα στη Μεγάλη Αίθουσα του Ωδείου της Μόσχας, στις 30 Ιουνίου 2015.

Ο Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος πραγματοποιείται κάθε τέσσερα χρόνια, είναι ίσως ο σημαντικότερος διαγωνισμός στο χώρο της κλασικής μουσικής. Ο διαγωνισμός διοργανώθηκε για πρώτη φορά το 1958, περιλαμβάνοντας μόνο δύο κατηγορίες: του βιολιού και του πιάνου. Το 1962, στη δεύτερη διοργάνωση, προστέθηκε η κατηγορία του βιολοντσέλου, ενώ στην τρίτη διοργάνωση του διαγωνισμού, το 1966, προστέθηκε ακόμη η κατηγορία της φωνής.

Στον 15ο Διαγωνισμό, το 2015, συμμετείχαν περισσότεροι από εξακόσιοι καλλιτέχνες από 45 χώρες, οι οποίοι διαγωνίστηκαν και στις τέσσερεις κατηγορίες: πιάνο, βιολί, βιολοντσέλο και φωνή.

Την κριτική επιτροπή για την κατηγορία του πιάνου αποτελούσαν οι διακεκριμένοι πιανίστες Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, καθώς επίσης και ο Martin Engström, ιδρυτής και διευθυντής του Διεθνούς Φεστιβάλ και της Ακαδημίας του Βερμπιέρ.



Ο Πιότρ Ιλίτς Τσαϊκόφσκι άρχισε να συνθέτει το Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο αρ. 1 σε Σι ύφεση ελάσσονα, έργο 23, τον Νοέμβριο του 1874 και το ολοκλήρωσε τον Φεβρουάριο του 1875. Αρχικά σκόπευε να το αφιερώσει στον φίλο του, πιανίστα Νικολάι Ρουμπινστάιν (1835-1881), αλλά όταν αυτός σε μια πρώτη ακρόαση του έργου στο Ωδείο της Μόσχας, στις 5 Ιανουαρίου 1875, το χαρακτήρισε «κοινότοπο» και «προχειροφτιαγμένο», οι σχέσεις των δύο ανδρών ψυχράνθηκαν. Ο συνθέτης ένιωσε βαθύτατα πληγωμένος και απέσυρε την αφιέρωση, την οποία πρόσφερε στον Γερμανό πιανίστα και διευθυντή ορχήστρας Χανς φον Μπίλοβ (1830-1894), ο οποίος σε ένα πρόσφατο άρθρο του είχε χαρακτηρίσει τον Τσαϊκόφσκι «έναν πολλά υποσχόμενο συνθέτη».

Ο φον Μπίλοβ κολακεύτηκε από την αφιέρωση και στην ευχαριστήρια επιστολή του προς τον συνθέτη του δήλωνε τον θαυμασμό του και τον κατέτασσε μεταξύ των πέντε καλύτερων σύγχρονων συνθετών τους οποίους εκτιμούσε· οι άλλοι τέσσερεις ήταν οι Μπραμς, Ραφ, Ραϊνμπέργκερ και Σαιν-Σανς. Στις 25 Οκτωβρίου του 1875 ο Μπίλοβ παρουσίασε για πρώτη φορά το Κοντσέρτο, στη Βοστόνη των ΗΠΑ, όπου βρισκόταν για καλλιτεχνική περιοδεία, ενθουσιάζοντας κοινό και κριτικούς.

Στις 13 Νοεμβρίου του ίδιου χρόνου ήταν η σειρά του ρωσικού μουσικόφιλου κοινού να υποδεχθεί θερμά το Κοντσέρτο του Τσαϊκόφσκι. Το πρωτοπαρουσίασε σε συναυλία στην Αγία Πετρούπολη ο Ρώσος πιανίστας και μουσικοδιδάσκαλος  Γκούσταβ Κρος (1831-1885). Λίγες ημέρες αργότερα, στις 3 Δεκεμβρίου, ήταν σειρά των κατοίκων της Μόσχας να αποθεώσουν τον συνθέτη. Το Κοντσέρτο ερμήνευσε ο Νικολάι Ρουμπινστάιν, ο οποίος, εν τω μεταξύ, είχε αναθεωρήσει τη στάση του απέναντι στο έργο και από δεινός επικριτής του είχε μεταμορφωθεί σε ενθουσιώδη υποστηρικτή του. Σε αναθεωρήσεις του έργου προέβη και ο Τσαϊκόφσκι, λαμβάνοντας σοβαρά, όπως φαίνεται τις υποδείξεις του φίλου του. Η πρώτη έγινε το καλοκαίρι του 1879 και η οριστική τον Δεκέμβριο του 1888.

Πηγή: sansimera.gr



Το Τρίτο Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο και ορχήστρα, του Σεργκέι Προκόφιεφ, γράφτηκε το καλοκαίρι του 1921, στη Βρετάνη. Οι απόκρημνες, παραθαλάσσιες περιοχές της βορειοδυτικής Γαλλίας, αποτελούσαν πόλο έλξης για πολλούς σημαντικούς καλλιτέχνες της εποχής, οι οποίοι εμπνέονταν από την άγρια ομορφιά του τοπίου. Το ίδιο συνέβη και με τον Προκόφιεφ που πέρασε το μεγαλύτερο μέρος εκείνου του καλοκαιριού συνθέτοντας και, στον ελεύθερο χρόνο του, κάνοντας παρέα με όσους Ρώσους καλλιτέχνες είχαν μεταναστεύσει εκεί. Ανάμεσά τους ήταν και ο μεγάλος συμβολιστής ποιητής Κονσταντίν Μπαλμόντ, στον οποίο αφιέρωσε ο Προκόφιεφ το Κοντσέρτο του. Η θριαμβευτική πρεμιέρα του έργου δόθηκε στις 16 Δεκεμβρίου 1921, στο Σικάγο, από τη Συμφωνική της πόλης, υπό τη διεύθυνση του Φρέντερικ Στοκ, με σολίστ τον ίδιο τον συνθέτη.



XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Final Round


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)


♪ Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, Op.23 (1874-1875, 1879, 1888) [00:00]*

i. Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso

ii. Andantino semplice
iii. Allegro con fuoco


Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)

♪ Piano Concerto No.3 in C major, Op.26 (1921) [38:56]

i. Andante – Allegro
ii. Tema con variazioni
iii. Allegro, ma non troppo


Dmitry Masleev, piano – First Prize

State Academic Symphony Orchestra "Evgeny Svetlanov"
Conductor: Alexey Bogorad

Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, June 30, 2015

(HD 720p)

* Start time of each work















The triumphant winner of the latest International Tchaikovsky Competition (2015), Dmitry Masleev took the First Prize and the international spotlight with wholehearted support from the audience, the jury, and the media. In his first touring season Mr. Masleev made a series of successful debuts, establishing his world-wide audience and developing his profile as a "future great pianist" (La Croix) of "virtuoso brilliance" (The Financial Times) and "musicality of metaphysical proportions" (Neue Musikzeitung ). Amongst the most notable performances are those at the Klavierfestival Ruhr, the Philharmonie am Gasteig in Munich, la Roque d'Anthéron and Bergamo & Brescia piano festivals, two tours of Japan with Valery Gergiev and Yury Bashmet, the French debut with Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse, the opening gala of the Istanbul Festival, as well as the last-minute replacement for the indisposed Maurizio Pollini in Basel.

These performances have inspired an ever-growing demand for Mr. Masleev's artistry. In January 2017, Carnegie Hall will present Mr. Masleev's highly anticipated debut at the Isaac Stern Auditorium with a recital programme featuring works by Scarlatti, Beethoven, Liszt, Rachmaninov and Prokofiev. The 2016-2017 season will also see him perform in Paris twice: at the Paris Philharmonie and the Fondation Louis Vuitton. He is honoured to return to the Philharmonie am Gasteig at Valery Gergiev's invitation to play the first three of Prokofiev's piano sonatas; later in the season he will perform in Munich once again, this time with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and the Beethoven Piano Concerto No.1. Mr. Masleev's orchestral collaborations also include a German tour with the National Philharmonic of Russia under Maestro Spivakov, an Asian tour with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France under Mikko Franck, and a performance of Rachmaninov Variations on a Theme of Paganini with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra and Robert Trevino. He will continue his tour of Germany's most prestigious festivals with recitals at Rheingau, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Bad Kissingen.

"A discovery and a brilliant pianist", is how his senior colleague Boris Berezovsky describes Dmitry Masleev, who will be performing a solo recital at the greatly acclaimed Pianoscope Festival in France, directed by Mr. Berezovsky. The two pianists will give a pair of duo recitals in Moscow later in the season, playing the music of Bartok and Liszt.

Born and raised in Ulan-Ude (a Siberian town between Lake Baikal and the Mongolian border), Dmitry Masleev was educated at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Professor Mikhail Petukhov, and at the International Music Academy at Lake Como. Prior to his triumph at the Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in Moscow, where the jury awarded him First Prize as well as a special award for the performance of the Mozart D minor Concerto, Mr. Masleev has won many competitions including the 7th Adilia Alieva Piano Competition in Gaillard (2010), the 21st Premio Chopin Piano Competition in Rome (2011), and the Antonio Napolitano Competition in Salerno (2013).

Source: dmitry-masleev.com



































More photos


See also


Dmitry Masleev – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015