Nicolas Altstaedt

Nicolas Altstaedt
Nicolas Altstaedt, cellist (b. 1982). Photo by Marco Borggreve

Thursday, April 26, 2018

César Franck: Le Chasseur maudit | Henri Dutilleux: Tout un monde lointain... | Claude Debussy: Nocturnes | Maurice Ravel: La Valse – Nicolas Altstaedt, University of Michigan Choral Union, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Fabien Gabel – Sunday, April 29, 2018, 03:00 PM EDT (GMT-4) – Livestream

Nicolas Altstaedt (Photo by Alescha Birkenholz)














French artists were masters in capturing the essence of a subject through suggestion and atmosphere – a trait not only found in visual arts and literature, but also through the music of French composers. The music of Franck, Debussy, Ravel, and Dutilleux conjures visions of distant worlds, the spirit of the hunt, the playfulness of natural light, and the soul of the dance in a program spanning a century of French impressionism.

The award-winning German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) performs Henri Dutilleux's Tout un monde lointain... (Concerto for cello and orchestra).


Sunday, April 29
Los Angeles: 12:00 PM
Lima: 13:00 PM
Detroit, New York, Toronto: 03:00 PM
Brasília: 04:00 PM
London: 08:00 PM
Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Warsaw: 09:00 PM
Athens, Kiev, Jerusalem, Moscow, Ankara: 10:00 PM

Monday, April 30
Beijing, Manila: 03:00 AM
Tokyo, Seoul: 04:00 AM

Find in my time zone (Soon...)

Live on Livestream



César Franck (1822-1890)

♪ Le Chasseur maudit, M. 44 (1882)


i. Le Paysage paisible du dimanche
ii. La Chasse
iii. La Malédiction
iv. La Poursuite des démons


Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013)

♪ Tout un monde lointain... (Concerto for cello and orchestra) (1967-1970)*

i. Enigme
ii. Regard
iii. Houles
iv. Miroirs
v. Hymne


Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

♪ Nocturnes, L. 91 (1897-1899)**

i. Nuages
ii. Fêtes
iii. Sirènes


Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

♪ La valse (1919-1920)


Nicolas Altstaedt, cello*

University of Michigan Choral Union**

Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Fabien Gabel

(HD 720p)


Live from Orchestra Hall, Max M. Fisher Music Center, Detroit


Sunday, April 29, 2018, 03:00 PM EDT (GMT-4) / 10:00 PM EEST (UTC+3)


Live on Livestream



Photo by Alescha Birkenholz














Renowned worldwide for his musical integrity and effortless virtuosity German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) is one of the most sought after and versatile artists today. As a soloist, conductor and artistic director of he enthralls audiences with repertoire spanning from the baroque to the contemporary.

At the beginning at the 2017-2018 season he performed the highly acclaimed Finnish Premiere of Esa-Pekka Salonen's new cello concerto under the baton of the composer at the Helsinki Festival. He will be Artist in Spotlight at the Concertgebouw in 2017-2018 and Artist in Residence 2018-2019 at the NDR Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, where is going to perform with Krzysztof Urbanski, Hannu Lintu and Christoph Eschenbach.  Later on he will be touring major european venues with the SWR Orchestra with Teodor Currentzis, the BBCSO, La Chambre Philharmonique with Emanuel Krivine and the Amsterdam Sinfonietta. Further engagements include debuts performances with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Yomiuri Nippon Symphony in Suntory Hall, Finnish Radio Symphony, Helsinki Philharmonic, Konzerthaus Orchestra Berlin with Juraj Valcuha, the Scottish Chamber as Soloist and conductor, Orchestre National de Belgique, Hongkong Sinfonietta and Les Violons du Roy as well as returning to the Deutsche Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin with Robin Ticciati.

Awarded the Credit Suisse Young Artist Award in 2010, he gave a highly acclaimed performance of the Schumann concerto with the Vienna Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel at the Lucerne Festival. Since then he has performed worldwide with orchestras such as the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich, Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra, Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, Melbourne- and New Zealand Symphony Orchestras working with conductors like Sir Roger Norrington, Andrew Manze, Lahav Shani, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sir Neville Marriner, Vladimir Fedosseev, Leif Segerstam, Dmitri Slobodeniouk, Alexander Shelley, Fabien Gabel, Joshua Weilerstein, Gustavo Gimeno, Giovanni Antonini and Andrea Marcon amongst many others.

In recital, Nicolas performs solo and with partners Fazil Say and Alexander Lonquich. He will tour both Europe and the US and will visit Istanbul, London Wigmore Hall, Bozar, Tonhalle Zurich, Koerner Hall Toronto, Theatre des Champs-Elysées, Amsterdam Concertgebouw and New York Carnegie Hall amongst others.

In Autumn 2017 Nicolas toured  Australia extensively as part of a Musica Viva Recital tour with Aleksandar Madzar.

As a chamber musician, Nicolas regularly plays with Janine Jansen, Vilde Frang, Andreas Ottensamer, Pekka Kuusisto, Antoine Tamestit, Lawrence Power, Jonathan Cohen and the Quatuor Ébène performing at Salzburg Mozart and Summer Festival, Verbier, Utrecht, BBC Proms, Lucerne, Gstaad, Musikfest Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein, Rheingau and Stavanger.

In 2012 Nicolas has been chosen by Gidon Kremer to become his successor as the new artistic director of the Lockenhaus Chamber Music Festival and in 2014, Adam Fischer asked him to follow in his footsteps as Artistic Director of the Haydn Philharmonie, with whom he regularly performs at the Vienna Konzerthaus, Esterházy Festival and will tour both China and Japan in the next season.

Nicolas premieres new music and performs with composers like Thomas Ades, Jörg Widmann, Thomas Larcher, Matthias Pintscher, Bryce Dessner, Nico Muhly and Fazil Say. He has commissioned the pianist/composer Hauschka as part of this season as Artistic Director of "Viva Cello" Festival in Liestal in 2016 inspired by a film script by Federico Fellini as well composers Sebastian Fagerlund, Thomas Larcher, Bryce Dessner and Helena Winkelman for new cello concertos.

Nicolas' recent recording of CPE Bach Concertos on Hyperion with Arcangelo and Jonathan Cohen received the BBC Music Magazine Concerto Award 2017. This year, he released a Recital CD with Fazil Say on Warner. Previous recordings of cello concerti by Haydn, Schumann, Ligeti, Shostakovich and Weinberg have been acclaimed worldwide.

Nicolas Altstaedt was a BBC New Generation Artist 2010-2012 and a recipient of the "Borletti Buitoni Trust Fellowship" in 2009. He plays a Giulio Cesare Gigli cello, Rome around 1760.

Source: nicolas-altstaedt.com


















Recognized internationally as one of the stars of the new generation, Fabien Gabel is a regular guest of major orchestras in Europe, North America and Asia. He has been music director of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra since September 2013, and was recently appointed music director of the Orchestre Français des Jeunes (French Youth Orchestra).

Following a highly-anticipated debut with the Cleveland Orchestra, Fabien embarks on an exciting 2017-2018 season that will take him across the United States and Europe, including high-profile performances with the National Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Frankfurt's Hessischer Rundfunk Orchester and the Orchestre de Paris. Additional American appearances include performances with the Houston Symphony Orchestra, Milwaukee Symphony, and the San Diego Symphony. After an acclaimed debut with the Deutsches Sinfonie Orchestra last season, Gabel's European engagements will again feature concerts throughout Germany (Staatskapelle Weimar in addition to Frankfurt), and welcome returns to the Orchestre de Paris, Helsinki Philharmonic, Antwerp Philharmonic and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.

Gabel has conducted leading orchestras around the world, including the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre de Paris, the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester in Hamburg, the DSO Berlin, Staatskappelle Dresden, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Oslo Philharmonic, Orchestra dell'Accademia Santa Cecilia di Roma, and the Seoul Philharmonic, among others.

His rapidly-expanding U.S. presence has seen him leading the Cleveland Orchestra, Houston Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, San Diego Symphony Orchestra and more.

Fabien Gabel has worked with soloists like Emmanuel Ax, Gidon Cremer, Christian Tetzlaff, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Julian Steckel, Johannes Moser, Antonio Meneses, Marc-André Hamelin, Beatrice Rana, Gautier Capuçon, and Simone Lamsma, or singers like Jennifer Larmore, Measha Bruggergosman, Danielle de Niese, Natalie Dessay, and Marie- Nicole Lemieux.

Fabien had first attracted international attention in 2004 winning the Donatella Flick competition in London, which subsequently led to his appointment as the LSO's assistant conductor for the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 seasons. Since then, the LSO has engaged him regularly as a guest conductor.

He made his professional conducting debut in 2003 with the Orchestre National de France and has since returned frequently.  He now regularly conducts this orchestra in subscription concerts at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris and recently recorded a French opera aria CD with them and mezzo Marie-Nicole Lemieux (Naïve).

Born in Paris in 1975 and a member of a family of accomplished musicians, Fabien Gabel began studying trumpet at the age of six, honing his skills at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris, which awarded him a First Prize in trumpet in 1996, and later at the Musik Hochschule of Karlsruhe. He went on to play in various Parisian orchestras under the direction of prominent conductors such as Pierre Boulez, Sir Colin Davis, Riccardo Muti, Seiji Ozawa, Simon Rattle and Bernard Haitink. In 2002 Fabien Gabel pursued his interest in conducting at the Aspen Summer Music Festival, where he studied with David Zinman, who invited him to appear as a guest conductor at the Festival in 2009. He has worked with Bernard Haitink and Sir Colin Davis as their assistant.

Source: fabiengabel.com


Nicolas Altstaedt (Photo by Alescha Birkenholz)















César Franck: Le Chasseur maudit

Despite his reputation as an idealistic cultivator of "pure" music, César Franck was as desirous of success as any other composer. And success in Paris meant either opera or an exciting orchestral work capable of firing the popular imagination, that is, the symphonic poem. During Franck's last and richest creative period, an inordinate amount of time was given to the composition of two operas, Hulda (1882-1885) and Ghiselle (1889-1890), which, though undone by incredibly mediocre books, contain some of his finest music and which remain almost wholly unknown. The symphonic poem began to take hold among French composers with Saint-Saëns' Le Rouet d'Omphale in 1871, followed by Phaëton (1873) and the enduringly popular Danse macabre (1874). Among Franck's pupils, d'Indy's imposing Wallenstein trilogy was completed the same year, and Franck's Les Éolides followed in 1876. The next three years were given to the completion of his oratorio, Les Béatitudes, with which he was largely preoccupied through the decade 1869-1879, and which he considered his masterpiece. That behind him, he dashed off Rebecca, a small oratorio intended to capitalize on the continuing vogue for things Oriental first sparked by Felicien David's Le Désert in 1844.

It was almost certainly Duparc who then turned Franck's attention to Gottfried August Bürger's ballad, Der wilde Jäger, for the subject of his own 1875 tone poem, Lénore, had been taken from another Bürger ballad. Laurence Davies, the eminent critic and author César Franck and His Circle, dismisses Bürger's narrative as "a Lisztian tale of adventure about a Count who defies the Sabbath to go hunting", thus trivializing both its import and its musical suggestiveness which Franck rang into ringing bronze in Le Chasseur maudit. The errant nobleman pursues the hunt with preternatural savagery while committing the same trespasses for which Satan was banished from heaven – pride, sacrilege, and defiance. From the distant bells to the fury of the hunt and the count's seizure by demons who condemn him to ride the skies throughout eternity, Franck unfolds the tale with the relish of a savvy raconteur who knows how to call to his aid spellbinding melody, viscerally gripping detail, and richly evocative orchestral color. The work was given its premiere at the 132nd concert of the Société National de Musique, Salle Érard on March 31, 1883, conducted by Édouard Colonne, where it shared a program with the tone poem, Viviane (1882), by his pupil, Chausson.

Source: Adrian Corleonis (allmusic.com)



Henri Dutilleux: Tout un monde lointain... (Concerto for cello and orchestra)

Although it is one of the most significant concertante works for cello and orchestra to have appeared during the second part of the twentieth century, the words cello concerto do not appear anywhere on the score of Tout un Monde Lointain (A Whole Remote World). Dutilleux took this title from Baudelaire's poem "La chevelure", from which the individual titles of the five movements are also taken. These ("Enigma", "Gaze", "Surges", "Mirrors", and "Hymn") suggest something of the atmosphere of the whole, but are not to be interpreted too literally. Structurally, the work is extremely complex. The opening movement sets out a basic dialogue between solo cello and orchestra, wide-ranging in tempo and registral effects, but with no sense of resolution between the protagonists. The music is cast as a set of variations on the 12-note theme heard at the outset and cross-referenced in each of the successive movements. The second and fourth sections are slow moving, while the third has the function of a scherzo, with solo writing of enormous technical difficulty. The final movement ("Hymn") is in the form of a vibrant Allegro, though the enigmatic overall feel of the work is still evident here. Dutilleux was commissioned to write the work by Igor Markevitch, who wanted a new concerto for Mstislav Rostropovich to perform with his Lamoureux Orchestra in the mid-1960s. Ironically, by the time Dutilleux began to write it, Markevitch had been replaced and the work was premiered by Rostropovich and the Paris Orchestra in Aix-en-Provence in 1970.

Source: Michael Jameson (allmusic.com)



Claude Debussy: Nocturnes

Claude Debussy's Three Nocturnes for Orchestra went through several incarnations before eventually assuming their final form. They were sketched under the title "Trois scènes au crépuscule" as early as 1892, and prior to their completion in 1899, Debussy toyed with the idea of casting them as vehicles for solo violin and orchestra. Debussy's developing skill as an orchestral colorist, first hinted at in 1892 with the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, comes to the fore in the Nocturnes, particularly the second, "Fêtes", which is regarded by many as one of the composers supreme creations.

A special role is allotted to the English horn in "Nuages" (Clouds), the first piece of the group. Thin, two-voice counterpoint in steady quarter notes provides a background for the English horn's rather plaintive gesture. The same melodic fragment is repeated several times with very little alteration or extension, interrupted occasionally by comments from the French horn section. A stark contrast is provided by a pentatonic interlude, scored for flute and harp against a sustained chordal background and marked "Un peu animé". The English horn raises its quiet voice again, only to dissolve against the pianissimo tremolo background as the flute takes up its melody one more time. The quietly pulsating pizzicati of "Nuages" conclusion provide a sense of "grey agony", as Debussy put it.

"Fêtes" (Festivals) will be friendly ground to any listener familiar with the final movement of Respighi's 1929 work along the same lines, Feste Romane. The juxtaposition of a forceful, even percussive, rhythmic ostinato in 12/8 time with the earthy tune of the brass band (representing the Garde Républicaine) provides for the same kind of multi-textural feel that Respighi would exploit even further three decades later. Through sheer repetition the music builds to several swaggering climaxes, only to be deflated each time and have to begin the process all over again. The music trails away into nothingness as the brass band finally completes its journey through the heart of the celebration. Remarkable about "Fêtes" is Debussy's ability to hint at raunchiness and vulgarity within the context of his own extremely refined soundworld.

A vocalizing (i.e., textless) women's chorus is added to the ensemble for "Sirènes", the last, and in many ways the most evocative of the Nocturnes. One must not be misled by "Sirènes" repetitiveness and apparent simplicity – a simplicity meant to parallel the deceptively innocent charm of the mythological sea sirens – for here is a work of great subtlety indeed. The dense intricacy of the orchestral effects contained throughout the piece, set almost exclusively at a piano or pianissimo dynamic indication, has reminded more than one listener of the techniques of that most accomplished of orchestrators, Maurice Ravel. Debussy's methods, however, are entirely his own. Not surprisingly, the music drifts away into the sea, floating upon the few sparse harmonics of the two harpists.

Source: Blair Johnston (allmusic.com)



Maurice Ravel: La valse

Maurice Ravel began "La valse" in 1919 and finished it the following year; the first performance was given on December 12, 1920, in Paris. The score calls for three flutes and piccolo, three oboes and english horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, snare drum, castanets, tam-tam, antique cymbals, celesta, two harps, and strings. Performance time is approximately thirteen minutes.

Ravel finished "La valse" in 1920. It wasn't what Diaghilev expected and he refused to stage it: "...this is not a ballet; it is a portrait of a ballet, it is a painting of a ballet". The two men never worked together again. Nonetheless, Ravel published the piece as a "choreographic poem for orchestra", and it was finally danced in Antwerp in 1926 and in Paris in 1928 by Ida Rubinstein's troupe, which also gave the premiere of Boléro just two days later.

Source: Phillip Huscher (program annotator for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra)












More photos


See also


Ernest Bloch: Schelomo, Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra – Nicolas Altstaedt, Gürzenich-Orchester Köln, Lahav Shani (HD 1080p)

Live on Livestream: All Past Events

Monday, April 23, 2018

Ernest Bloch: Schelomo, Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra – Nicolas Altstaedt, Gürzenich-Orchester Köln, Lahav Shani (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Gürzenich-Orchester Köln under the baton of the Israeli conductor Lahav Shani (b. 1989), the award-winning German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) performs Ernest Bloch's Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra. The concert was recorded at Kölner Philharmonie, on June 20, 2017.



Schelomo, subtitled "Rhapsodie hébraïque", was written in the space of six weeks during January and February 1916. Bloch had, over a number of years, noted down thematic ideas for a vocal setting of selected verses from the biblical book of Ecclesiastes, the authorship of which is attributed to King Solomon (Hebrew: Schelomo) who reigned some 3000 years ago. Bloch had felt, however, that French, German or English were somehow unsuitable for the purpose, and that his grasp of Hebrew was inadequate. Coming into contact with the celebrated Russian cellist Alexandre Barjansky (1883-1961) and his wife Katja in Geneva towards the end of 1915 (some six years after their first meeting), Bloch was keen to share with them his "Jewish Cycle" in general, and this new work in particular. Barjansky was greatly moved by what he heard. Realizing that the cello was the solution to the language problem, Bloch reformulated his sketches and passed them to Alexandre for scrutiny, while Katja at the same time made a small sculpture of King Solomon. In gratitude, Bloch dedicated Schelomo to the Barjanskys.

According to Bloch: "It is possible to imagine that the solo cello is the incarnation of King Solomon, and that the orchestra represents his internal world and his experience of life, though sometimes it is the orchestra that seems to reflect Solomon's thoughts, while the solo instrument voices his words: ‘All is vanity’". Bloch places much emphasis on the king's pessimism, despite "the royal pomp, the treasure, the wealth, the power, the women, all that a man might desire in this world", and "the barbaric coloration of an Oriental world" that surround him. The rhapsodic manner and glittering instrumentation may give the work an improvised air, but the underlying structure is a sturdy "ternary" form (ABA), plus an introduction and coda.

The heroic melody that appears before and during the great orchestral climaxes occurring towards the end of the first and third sections of Schelomo is built upon motifs that bear a remarkable resemblance to the those of Tzur Yisroel ("Rock of Israel"), a traditional chant that Bloch received from Reuben Rinder (1887-1966, Cantor at Temple Emanu-El, San Francisco) in the late 1920s while preparing his Avodath Hakodesh ("Sacred Service", 1930-1933). Nevertheless, although numerous motifs throughout the six published works of the "Jewish Cycle" are the composer's subconscious transformations of biblical and cantorial chant, in only one instance did Bloch acknowledge that he had consciously taken a melody from a traditional source – a motif that his father "sang often, in Hebrew", which appears for the first time at the beginning of the middle section of Schelomo. Bloch quoted the Hebrew text in a letter written to his mother four years after the work had been completed; and the melody is, in fact, an adaptation of a South German cantorial chant Uv'chen ten pachdecha, sung in Ashkenazi synagogues during High Holy Days.

"Almost all my works, even the darkest ones, still end optimistically, or at least with some hope. This is the only one that concludes in complete negation. But the subject demanded it." The opening of Ecclesiastes confirms Bloch's observation: "The words of Kohelet, the son of David, king in Jerusalem. Vanity of vanities, saith Kohelet... And I applied my heart to seek and to search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven... and, behold, all is vanity and a striving after wind".

Despite the enormously demanding technical skills required of the soloist, this is not a concerto in the usual sense, and virtuosity is always the servant of that expressiveness in which the spiritual and sensual are fused.

Source: Alexander Knapp (hyperion-records.co.uk)



Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)

♪ Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra (1916)


Encore:

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

♪ Le carnaval des animaux / Carnival of the Animals (1886)

xiii. Le Cygne (The Swan)


Nicolas Altstaedt, cello

Gürzenich-Orchester Köln
Conductor: Lahav Shani

Kölner Philharmonie, June 20, 2017

(HD 1080p)















Renowned worldwide for his musical integrity and effortless virtuosity German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) is one of the most sought after and versatile artists today. As a soloist, conductor and artistic director of he enthralls audiences with repertoire spanning from the baroque to the contemporary.

At the beginning at the 2017-2018 season he performed the highly acclaimed Finnish Premiere of Esa-Pekka Salonen's new cello concerto under the baton of the composer at the Helsinki Festival. He will be Artist in Spotlight at the Concertgebouw in 2017-2018 and Artist in Residence 2018-2019 at the NDR Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, where is going to perform with Krzysztof Urbanski, Hannu Lintu and Christoph Eschenbach.  Later on he will be touring major european venues with the SWR Orchestra with Teodor Currentzis, the BBCSO, La Chambre Philharmonique with Emanuel Krivine and the Amsterdam Sinfonietta. Further engagements include debuts performances with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Yomiuri Nippon Symphony in Suntory Hall, Finnish Radio Symphony, Helsinki Philharmonic, Konzerthaus Orchestra Berlin with Juraj Valcuha, the Scottish Chamber as Soloist and conductor, Orchestre National de Belgique, Hongkong Sinfonietta and Les Violons du Roy as well as returning to the Deutsche Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin with Robin Ticciati.

Awarded the Credit Suisse Young Artist Award in 2010, he gave a highly acclaimed performance of the Schumann concerto with the Vienna Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel at the Lucerne Festival. Since then he has performed worldwide with orchestras such as the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich, Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra, Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, Melbourne- and New Zealand Symphony Orchestras working with conductors like Sir Roger Norrington, Andrew Manze, Lahav Shani, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sir Neville Marriner, Vladimir Fedosseev, Leif Segerstam, Dmitri Slobodeniouk, Alexander Shelley, Fabien Gabel, Joshua Weilerstein, Gustavo Gimeno, Giovanni Antonini and Andrea Marcon amongst many others.

In recital, Nicolas performs solo and with partners Fazil Say and Alexander Lonquich. He will tour both Europe and the US and will visit Istanbul, London Wigmore Hall, Bozar, Tonhalle Zurich, Koerner Hall Toronto, Theatre des Champs-Elysées, Amsterdam Concertgebouw and New York Carnegie Hall amongst others.

In Autumn 2017 Nicolas toured  Australia extensively as part of a Musica Viva Recital tour with Aleksandar Madzar.

As a chamber musician, Nicolas regularly plays with Janine Jansen, Vilde Frang, Andreas Ottensamer, Pekka Kuusisto, Antoine Tamestit, Lawrence Power, Jonathan Cohen and the Quatuor Ébène performing at Salzburg Mozart and Summer Festival, Verbier, Utrecht, BBC Proms, Lucerne, Gstaad, Musikfest Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein, Rheingau and Stavanger.

In 2012 Nicolas has been chosen by Gidon Kremer to become his successor as the new artistic director of the Lockenhaus Chamber Music Festival and in 2014, Adam Fischer asked him to follow in his footsteps as Artistic Director of the Haydn Philharmonie, with whom he regularly performs at the Vienna Konzerthaus, Esterházy Festival and will tour both China and Japan in the next season.

Nicolas premieres new music and performs with composers like Thomas Ades, Jörg Widmann, Thomas Larcher, Matthias Pintscher, Bryce Dessner, Nico Muhly and Fazil Say. He has commissioned the pianist/composer Hauschka as part of this season as Artistic Director of "Viva Cello" Festival in Liestal in 2016 inspired by a film script by Federico Fellini as well composers Sebastian Fagerlund, Thomas Larcher, Bryce Dessner and Helena Winkelman for new cello concertos.

Nicolas' recent recording of CPE Bach Concertos on Hyperion with Arcangelo and Jonathan Cohen received the BBC Music Magazine Concerto Award 2017. This year, he released a Recital CD with Fazil Say on Warner. Previous recordings of cello concerti by Haydn, Schumann, Ligeti, Shostakovich and Weinberg have been acclaimed worldwide.

Nicolas Altstaedt was a BBC New Generation Artist 2010-2012 and a recipient of the "Borletti Buitoni Trust Fellowship" in 2009. He plays a Giulio Cesare Gigli cello, Rome around 1760.

Source: nicolas-altstaedt.com















Prodigiously gifted Israeli conductor, Lahav Shani's conducting career was launched when he won first prize at the 2013 Gustav Mahler International Conducting Competition in Bamberg. Since then he has quickly established himself as one of the most talked about young conducting talents making a huge impression with his astonishing maturity and natural, instinctive musicality.

In August 2016 it was announced that Shani will become Chief Conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra in September 2018, taking over from Yannick Nézet-Séguin and becoming the youngest chief conductor in the orchestra's history. In the 2020-2021 season, Shani will succeed Zubin Mehta as Music Director of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, and will be the orchestra's Music Director Designate from 2019-2020. In the 2017-2018 season, Shani became Principal Guest Conductor of the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, following a number of appearances with the orchestra since his debut in May 2015, including a major European tour in January 2016.

Recent and upcoming highlights as a guest conductor include the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Boston Symphony, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestre de Paris, Philadelphia Orchestra, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, Bamberger Symphoniker and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France.

Shani made a sensational debut with the Berlin Staatskapelle in June 2014 with concerts at the Berlin Konzerthaus and the Berlin Philharmonie, and has since returned regularly to conduct both at the Berlin Staatsoper and for symphonic concerts. In December 2015 Shani stepped in, at short notice, to make his debut with the Vienna Philharmonic in the Musikverein when he directed Bach: Concerto in D minor from the keyboard and conducted Mahler 1 winning a standing ovation from the public and high praise from the critics.

In October 2013 Shani was invited to open the season of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. An immediate re-invitation followed for the next two seasons and in December 2016 he conducted the final concert of the orchestra's 80th birthday celebrations. His close relationship with the Israel Philharmonic started in 2007 when he performed Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto under the baton of Zubin Mehta and then continued in the following years as both a pianist and also as a double-bass player.

Shani was born in Tel Aviv in 1989 and started his piano studies aged six with Hannah Shalgi, continuing with Prof. Arie Vardi at the Buchmann-Mehta School of Music in Tel Aviv. He then went on to complete his studies in conducting with Prof. Christian Ehwald and piano with Prof. Fabio Bidini, both at the Academy of Music Hanns Eisler Berlin. Whilst a student he was mentored by Daniel Barenboim.

Shani has play-directed piano concerti with orchestras including the Philharmonia Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. Upcoming piano engagements include appearances with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the Beethoven Triple Concerto with Renaud and Gautier Capuçon with the Israel Philharmonic. He will also make his recital debut at the Boulez Saal in Berlin this season. Shani also has considerable experience performing chamber music and makes his playing debut this season at the Festival d'Aix-en-Provence and at the Cologne Philharmonie, as well as returning to the Verbier Festival where he made his debut in July 2017.

Source: intermusica.co.uk (2018)



















































More photos


See also

Felix Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor – Vlad Stanculeasa, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Lahav Shani

Gustav Mahler: Symphony No.1 in D major "Titan" – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Lahav Shani

Lahav Shani: An Exciting Young Conductor

Friday, April 20, 2018

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Marita Solberg, Tuija Knihtilä, Barry Banks, Henning von Schulman, Gothenburg Symphony Chorus & Orchestra, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli (HD 1080p)














The Italian conductor Roberto Rizzi Brignoli directs Verdi's Requiem with Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and Choir with soloists Marita Solberg (soprano), Tuija Knihtilä (mezzo-soprano), Barry Banks (tenor) and Henning von Schulman (bass). The concert was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on October 21, 2017.

Requiem, also called Requiem Mass, Italian in full Messa da requiem per l'anniversario della morte di Manzoni 22 maggio 1874 ("Requiem Mass for the Anniversary of the Death of Manzoni May 22, 1874"), requiem mass by Giuseppe Verdi, intended as a memorial to a departed hero – the poet, playwright, and novelist Alessandro Manzoni. Requiem premiered in Milan on May 22, 1874. It is Verdi's largest-scale nonoperatic work.

The leading Italian writer of the 1800s, Manzoni played the role in Italy that Goethe had for an earlier generation of Germans: that of the country's literary soul. On May 22, 1873, when Manzoni passed away, all Italy mourned. Verdi, in a letter to his publisher, expressed a wish to write something in memory of Manzoni. Determined to conduct the work himself on the first anniversary of Manzoni's death, Verdi arranged with the city of Milan that the premiere would take place in San Marco. Requiem premiered on schedule to massive public acclaim. The performance at San Marco was followed by three more at La Scala.

In the opening "Requiem Aeternam", "Te Decet Hymnus", and "Kyrie" sections, Verdi gradually builds up energy on flowing lines of imitative polyphony.

The second movement, which has 10 sections, begins with a "Dies Irae" that spans roughly half an hour by itself. It opens with strident brass, swirling strings and the tumultuous fury of the chorus's lines. For the "Tuba Mirum" portion, the solo trumpet grows to a trumpet ensemble as the composer evokes the trumpet that on Judgment Day calls forth the dead from their graves. Also of note in this movement are the virtuosic use of the vocal quartet in the "Rex Tremendae" section and the tenor aria in the "Ingemisco".

The "Offertorio" (third movement) sets the chorus aside in favour of the vocal quartet, though the chorus returns in force for the "Sanctus" (fourth movement). The "Agnus Dei" (fifth movement) begins with the soprano and mezzo-soprano in lullaby-like a capella lines, before being joined gently by the chorus and orchestra. The "Lux Aeterna" (sixth movement) combines the mezzo-soprano not with the soprano, but rather with the tenor and bass, as shimmering string tremolos seek to capture the sense of that eternal light.

For the seventh and final movement, "Libera Me", Verdi provides assertive lines for the solo soprano, while the chorus is set in a far more soft-spoken fashion, at least until the return of the tempest of sound that is the "Dies Irae". The "Requiem Aeternam" of the first movement is also repeated. In the final section of the work, Verdi layers the choral parts into a restless fugue.

Source: Betsy Schwarm (britannica.com)


Verdi completed his Requiem Mass in April 1874 and conducted the first performance on May 22, 1874, at the church of San Marco in Milan. The work is scored for solo quartet, mixed chorus, and an orchestra consisting of three flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, four bassoons, four horns, four trumpets (with four additional trumpets offstage), three trombones and tuba (replacing the obsolete ophicleide), timpani, bass drum, and strings.



Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901)

♪ Messa da Requiem (1874)

i. Introit and Kyrie (chorus, soloists)
ii. Dies irae
Dies irae (chorus)
Tuba mirum (chorus)
Mors stupebit (bass)
Liber scriptus (mezzo-soprano, chorus)
Quid sum miser (soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor)
Rex tremendae (soloists, chorus)
Recordare (soprano, mezzo-soprano)
Ingemisco (tenor)
Confutatis (bass, chorus)
Lacrymosa (soloists, chorus)
iii. Offertory
Domine Jesu Christe (soloists)
Hostias (soloists)
iv. Sanctus (double chorus)
v. Agnus Dei (soprano, mezzo-soprano, chorus)
vi. Lux aeterna (mezzo-soprano, tenor, bass)
vii. Libera me (soprano, chorus)
Libera me
Dies irae
Requiem aeternam
Libera me

Marita Solberg, soprano
Tuija Knihtilä, mezzo-soprano
Barry Banks, tenor
Henning von Schulman, bass

Gothenburg Symphony Choir
Choir Master: Alexander Einarsson

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli

Gothenburg Concert Hall, October 21, 2017

(HD 1080p)















Roberto Rizzi Brignoli graduated with honors in Piano at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory in Milan, where he also studied composition and conducting. Until 2002, he was Head of Music Services at the Teatro alla Scala and eventually started collaborating with Riccardo Muti, whose appreciation of him resulted in Brignoli conducting numerous productions there.

The turning points of his career and the events which made him internationally renowned were the productions of Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia and Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, when he took over the musical direction at short notice, gaining a huge success.

The emphasis of his artistic work lies in the whole range of the Italian and French operatic repertoire, as well as in the classic, romantic, up to the modern symphonic repertoire. During his intense symphonic activity he worked with such institutions as the Orchestra dell'Arena di Verona, Orchestra Sinfonica del Teatro dell'Opera di Roma, Orchestra of Teatro Carlo Felice in Genova, Orchestra dei Pomeriggi Musicali in Milan, I Cameristi della Scala, Orchestra Toscanini of Parma, Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, Limburger Symphonic Orchestra, Radio Filharmonisch Orkest in Amsterdam, Orchestra of the Opéra de Lyon, Orchestre National de Lille, Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Orchestre National de France.

In addition to his extensive symphonic work, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli also led countless opera stagings, including Otello, La Traviata, Rigoletto, I Due Foscari, L'elisir d'amore, Adriana Lecouvreur, and La Fille du Régiment at the most renowned opera houses and festivals in Italy, Spain, France, Japan, Switzerland, the USA, and Germany, including Hamburg and at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, with whom he has had a close relationship since several years and where he is annually leading, in particular, new productions.

In 2010, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli made his acclaimed debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York with La Bohème. Highlights of recent years include Rigoletto at the Avanches Festival and at the Chorégies d'Orange, Norma, Tosca, Luisa Miller, and La Fille du Régiment in Lausanne, Lucia di Lammermoor, I due Foscari, La Traviata, as well as the greatly successful new productions of La Rondine (Stage Director: Rolando Villazón) and L'Elisier d'Amore at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, Macbeth, Lucia di Lammermoor und Il Trovatore in Lille, Manon Lescaut in Muscat, Un ballo in Maschera in Metz, Il Turco in Italia in Hamburg, Il Trovatore in Luxemburg, and Lucia di Lammermoor in Avignon.

Among his projects in season 2017-2018 are La Bohème in Metz, Nabucco at Deutsche Oper Berlin and at the Opéra de Lille, Madama Butterfly at Staatstheater Stuttgart, Il barbiere di Siviglia at the Opéra de Marseille, Simon Boccanegra in Dijon, Anna Bolena in Lausanne, as well as concerts in Gothenburg and Avignon.

Roberto Rizzi Brignoli has recorded for Sony and a recording for Warner is following soon. Furthermore, the productions of Adriana Lecouvreur performed at the Teatro alla Scala, as well as La Rondine at Deutsche Oper Berlin are available on DVD.

Source: orlob.net



















































More photos


See also

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Tamara Wilson, Alisa Kolosova, Dimitri Pittas, Morris Robinson, BBC Proms Youth Choir, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Marin Alsop

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Michèle Crider, Markella Hatziano, Gabriel Sadé, Robert Lloyd, London Symphony Chorus & Orcherstra, Richard Hickox (Audio video)

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra (HD 1080p)














Genesis means beginning, and it is also the title of the Book of Genesis. In clarinettist Martin Fröst's latest project, ancient Greek music is juxtaposed against Anders Hillborg's urban sound – a time span of almost 2000 years! "We start with the roots of the music and explore how through them we can open a new musical door to the future", says Martin Fröst.

In the acclaimed performance of Genesis, charismatic clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst builds upon music from 300 years before the beginning of our era and spans musically up to our time.

Clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst continuously explores different aspects of the essence of music, creating new artistic expressions with both old and newly written music. The origins and development of classical music comprise the theme of Genesis, and we get to follow along on a journey through musical history, from ancient jester traditions to brand new music by Anders Hillborg. In between are wonderfully swinging klezmer pieces, musical invocations and bustling Baroque.

"It's all connected, and the music also reflects people. When I listen to a modern piece, I sometimes experience a cross-section of musical history layered into the music. Because so much more unites old and new music and music from different parts of the world than one might think. For example, this can be heard when the piece ‘Jag vet en Dejlig Rosa’ transitions into Olivier Messiaen's ‘Les offrandes oubliées’. Or how Anders Hillborg's newly composed piece is a response to Hildegard of Bingen's music, which is nearly 900 years old", comments Martin Fröst on his performance of Genesis.

The concert performance was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on January 27, 2018.


With English subtitles



Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst

Anders Hillborg: Incantation
Hildegard von Bingen: Ancient Suite (Arr. Jonas Forssell)
Georg Philipp Telemann: Presto from Concerto for recorder, flute, strings and harpsichord (Arr. Jonas Forssell)
Astor Piazzolla: La muerte del Ángel
Jonas Dominique: Duo No.1 & Duo No.2 for clarinets
Anders Hillborg: Hymn of Echoes
Anders Hillborg: Hyper Run from Clarinet Concerto "Peacock Tales", Millenium Version
Anders Hillborg: Primal Blues
Göran Fröst: Klezmer Dance No.2
Béla Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances
Jonas Dominique: Duo No.4 for clarinets
Traditional: Let's Be Happy. Royal Wedding Version (Arr. Göran Fröst)
Anders Hillborg: Hyper Exit

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor & clarinet soloist: Martin Fröst

Härlanda flickkör
Birgitta Mannerström-Molin, choirmaster

Håvard Lysebo, flute
Magnus Holmander, clarinet
Sandra Ibarreche Burgos, clarinet
Olof Wendel, cimbalom

Ambra Succi, choreographer
Maja Andersson, koreografassistent
Linus Fellbom, lighting design

Gothenburg Concert HallJanuary 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Martin Fröst (b. 1970) is a Swedish clarinetist and conductor. As a youth, Fröst began musical studies on violin at age 5. At age 8, he started to learn the clarinet. He studied with Hans Deinzer in Germany and Sölve Kingstedt and Kjell-Inge Stevensson in Stockholm.

Fröst's work in contemporary music includes collaborations with Anders Hillborg, Krzysztof Penderecki, Kalevi Aho, Rolf Martinsson, Bent Sørensen, Victoria Borisova-Ollas, Karin Rehnqvist and Sven-David Sandström.

Fröst was artistic leader of the Vinterfest music festival for 10 seasons, concluding his tenure in 2015. He became joint artistic director of the Stavanger International Chamber Music Festival in 2010, and served in that until 2015. He has been a conductor-in-association with the Norrköpings Symfoniorkester (Norrkoping Symphony Orchestra). In May 2017, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra announced the appointment of Fröst as its next principal conductor, effective with the 2019-2020 season, with an initial contract of 3 seasons.

In the USA, in October 2014, Fröst first appeared with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO). Based on this concert, in November 2014, the SPCO named Fröst one of its Artistic Partners, effective with the 2015-2016 season, with an initial contract of 4 years. He was to have made his first appearance in the post in November 2015, but was unable to perform due to Meniere's Disease. The effects of the ailment delayed Fröst's appearances as an SPCO artistic partner until February 2017.

Fröst and his family live in Stockholm. He has recorded commercially for such labels as BIS Records and Sony Classical. In May 2014, he received the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, the first clarinetist so honoured.

Source: en.wikipedia.org



In May 2017, it was announced that Martin Fröst will be Chief Conductor of the Swedish Chamber Orchestra from the 2019-2020 season and he will return to the Orchestra in autumn 2017. Known for artistic collaborations worldwide, this season he continues as Artistic Partner with both The Saint Paul Chamber and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic orchestras, at which he launchs a new project Retrotopia including a new commission by Jesper Nordin. This project follows in the footsteps of his critically acclaimed project Genesis, which he also performs this season with the Gothenburg Symphony. In 2017-2018 Fröst will also be Artist in Residence at L'Auditiori, Barcelona appearing with the Orquestra Simfònica de Barcelona I Nacional de Catalunya and performing a number of chamber concerts. These positions follow his success in recent seasons as Artist-in-Residence at the Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Gothenburg Symphony and London's Wigmore Hall.

In autumn 2017, Fröst is joined by Janine Jansen, Lucas Debargue and Torleif Thedéen to release Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, his second recording for Sony Classics. Together this season, the Quartet will give performances of the work worldwide, including at New York's Carnegie Hall, as well as in Barcelona, Toronto and Quebec City. Fröst's first recording for the label, Roots, received huge critical acclaim and in recognition he received the 2016 ECHO Klassik Instrumentalist of the Year Award for clarinet. Chamber dates this season also include a return to Schubertiade and London's Wigmore Hall to perform with Quatuor Ébène. Fröst regularly performs with leading international artists including Sol Gabetta, Yuja Wang, Leif Ove Andsnes, Roland Pöntinen, Maxim Rysanov and Antoine Tamestit.

Highlights of his last season included debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returned to the Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, with whom he also toured Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the NDR Radiophilharmonie.

Source: harrisonparrott.com



















































More photos


See also


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro | Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.4 in B flat major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Martin Fröst (HD 1080p)

Olivier Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps – Martin Fröst, Lucas Debargue, Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)


Dollhouse: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts


Friday, April 13, 2018

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro | Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.4 in B flat major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Martin Fröst (HD 1080p)














Under the baton of the Swedish clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra performs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Overture to The Marriage of Figaro, K.492, and Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60. The concert was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on January 27, 2018.



Le Nozze di Figaro, ossia la folle giornata (The Marriage of Figaro, or The Day of Madness), K.492, is a comic opera in four acts composed in 1786 by Mozart, with an Italian libretto written by Lorenzo Da Ponte based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, La folle journée, ou le Mariage de Figaro. The opera was the first of three collaborations between Mozart and Da Ponte; their later collaborations were Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte. The Overture to the Marriage of Figaro was written just a couple of hours before the opera's premiere. Unusually, it does not quote any music from the opera itself.

Source: musopen.org


Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60, is a creation that found no justice, considered to be an intermediary symphony between Symphony No.3 and Symphony No.5. The story of its appearance is pretty uncertain because no drafts remained. We only know it was written while Beethoven was working on Symphony No.5. Nevertheless, it can be considered a study on the problematic of classical symphony.

Part I (Adagio – Allegro vivace) starts with a slow introduction which contains all the traces of the entire symphonic discourse, coming as a true synthesis of the symphony. The two themes are successively shown in the form of sonatas with great concision, the movement ending in a Coda which is nothing but a culmination and not a conclusion as we might have expected from his previous works.

Part II (Adagio) its main theme is of great musicality through the prime violins and it is followed by another theme with resonances from the previous symphony.

Part III (Allegro vivace) is full of life, structured on Beethoven's scherzo principle, only much more improved. Thematic elements can be easily recognized from the introduction of the first part.

Part IV (Allegro ma non troppo) in the form of a sonata with a Coda in large dimensions, it expresses the same vital force and joy of life.

The freshness and spontaneity of the themes, the lack of tragic motives, the perfection of the form triggered the enthusiasm of his contemporaries. German composer Robert Schumann was comparing it to "a supple Greek girl, standing in between two giants from the West", while Felix Mendelssohn chose it to be performed at his first concert at Gewandhaus in Leipzig.

Source: all-about-beethoven.com



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

♪ Overture to The Marriage of Figaro, K.492 (1786)


Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60 (1806)

i. Adagio – Allegro vivace
ii. Adagio
iii. Allegro vivace
iv. Allegro ma non troppo


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Martin Fröst

Lighting design by Linus Fellbom

Gothenburg Concert Hall, January 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Martin Fröst (b. 1970) is a Swedish clarinetist and conductor. As a youth, Fröst began musical studies on violin at age 5. At age 8, he started to learn the clarinet. He studied with Hans Deinzer in Germany and Sölve Kingstedt and Kjell-Inge Stevensson in Stockholm.

Fröst's work in contemporary music includes collaborations with Anders Hillborg, Krzysztof Penderecki, Kalevi Aho, Rolf Martinsson, Bent Sørensen, Victoria Borisova-Ollas, Karin Rehnqvist and Sven-David Sandström.

Fröst was artistic leader of the Vinterfest music festival for 10 seasons, concluding his tenure in 2015. He became joint artistic director of the Stavanger International Chamber Music Festival in 2010, and served in that until 2015. He has been a conductor-in-association with the Norrköpings Symfoniorkester (Norrkoping Symphony Orchestra). In May 2017, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra announced the appointment of Fröst as its next principal conductor, effective with the 2019-2020 season, with an initial contract of 3 seasons.

In the USA, in October 2014, Fröst first appeared with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO). Based on this concert, in November 2014, the SPCO named Fröst one of its Artistic Partners, effective with the 2015-2016 season, with an initial contract of 4 years. He was to have made his first appearance in the post in November 2015, but was unable to perform due to Meniere's Disease. The effects of the ailment delayed Fröst's appearances as an SPCO artistic partner until February 2017.

Fröst and his family live in Stockholm. He has recorded commercially for such labels as BIS Records and Sony Classical. In May 2014, he received the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, the first clarinetist so honoured.

Source: en.wikipedia.org



In May 2017, it was announced that Martin Fröst will be Chief Conductor of the Swedish Chamber Orchestra from the 2019-2020 season and he will return to the Orchestra in autumn 2017. Known for artistic collaborations worldwide, this season he continues as Artistic Partner with both The Saint Paul Chamber and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic orchestras, at which he launchs a new project Retrotopia including a new commission by Jesper Nordin. This project follows in the footsteps of his critically acclaimed project Genesis, which he also performs this season with the Gothenburg Symphony. In 2017-2018 Fröst will also be Artist in Residence at L'Auditiori, Barcelona appearing with the Orquestra Simfònica de Barcelona I Nacional de Catalunya and performing a number of chamber concerts. These positions follow his success in recent seasons as Artist-in-Residence at the Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Gothenburg Symphony and London's Wigmore Hall.

In autumn 2017, Fröst is joined by Janine Jansen, Lucas Debargue and Torleif Thedéen to release Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, his second recording for Sony Classics. Together this season, the Quartet will give performances of the work worldwide, including at New York's Carnegie Hall, as well as in Barcelona, Toronto and Quebec City. Fröst's first recording for the label, Roots, received huge critical acclaim and in recognition he received the 2016 ECHO Klassik Instrumentalist of the Year Award for clarinet. Chamber dates this season also include a return to Schubertiade and London's Wigmore Hall to perform with Quatuor Ébène. Fröst regularly performs with leading international artists including Sol Gabetta, Yuja Wang, Leif Ove Andsnes, Roland Pöntinen, Maxim Rysanov and Antoine Tamestit.

Highlights of his last season included debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returned to the Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, with whom he also toured Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the NDR Radiophilharmonie.

Source: harrisonparrott.com







































More photos


See also

Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra (HD 1080p)

Olivier Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps – Martin Fröst, Lucas Debargue, Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Dollhouse: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts