Dmitry Masleev

Dmitry Masleev
Dmitry Masleev (b. 1988), pianist – First Prize (XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015)

Friday, February 21, 2014

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.4 in G major – Mitsuko Uchida, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Mariss Jansons (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Japan-born (naturalized in Britain) classical pianist Mitsuko Uchida performs Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.4 in G major, Op.58. Conductor: Mariss Jansons. Recorded during the BBC Proms 2013 in London.

Beethoven's Concerto Νo.4 was finished in 1806 and premiered on December 22nd 1808 at the Theater an der Wien, with Beethoven as the soloist. It is a known fact that Beethoven attempted to present the Concerto at an earlier time but was forced to wait since he could not find any piano players for the solo part.

Just like many of Beethoven's works this Concerto was dedicated to Archduke Rudolf to whom the composer dedicated, among others, his Piano Concerto No.5, numerous piano sonatas, his Violin Sonata or his Triple Concerto.

Starting with this Concerto, Beethoven attributes a greater role to the orchestra in its relationship with the unaccompanied instrument, creating concertos that are considered genuine solo instrumental symphonies.

The Piano Concerto No.4 in G major has three parts:

Allegro moderato: starts with the presentation of the theme by the solo instrument renouncing at the presentation made by the orchestra as he had done in the first concertos.

Andante con moto: is a part full of contrasts, constructed like a dialogue between the orchestra and the solo instrument. The conversational character of this part renders the image of Orpheus, who, through his music, overcomes all hardships.

Rondo – Vivace: brings a cheerful and optimistic note through the themes of simple folkloric-like dance rhythms.

Source: all-about-beethoven.com
















Η διάσημη Γιαπωνέζα πιανίστρια Μιτσούκο Ουσίντα ερμηνεύει το Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο αρ. 4 σε Σολ μείζονα, έργο 58, του Λούντβιχ βαν Μπετόβεν. Τη Συμφωνική Ορχήστρα της Βαυαρικής Ραδιοφωνίας διευθύνει ο σπουδαίος Λετονός μαέστρος Μαρίς Τζάνσονς. Η συναυλία δόθηκε στο Ρόιαλ Άλμπερτ Χολ του Λονδίνου, στο πλαίσιο των BBC Proms 2013.

Το Τέταρτο Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο του Μπετόβεν, ενάντια στις μορφολογικές συμβάσεις του είδους, ξεκινά με το πιάνο, με μια φράση πέντε μέτρων στην οποία τα έγχορδα αποκρίνονται πολύ πιο άμεσα απ' ό,τι στην αργή κίνηση που ακολουθεί. Είναι σχεδόν σαν ένα τμήμα της ορχήστρας να έχει αποσπαστεί και παρότι η ορχήστρα προχωρεί στην παράθεση του θέματος, το τμήμα αυτό εξακολουθεί να απαντά στις επαναλαμβανόμενες φράσεις του πιάνου – τέσσερεις ισοδύναμοι ήχοι, ο τελευταίος τονισμένος – σαν να μη μπορεί να τις βγάλει από το μυαλό του. (Ίσως να θυμίζει τη μοιραία παρουσία του ίδιου ρυθμικού σχήματος στην Πέμπτη Συμφωνία, αν και ενδεχομένως η Συμφωνία που θα μπορούσε να θυμηθεί κανείς εδώ θα ήταν η Ποιμενική.)

Ολόκληρη η τεράστια αυτή κίνηση, σχεδόν όσο ένα ολόκληρο κοντσέρτο του Μότσαρτ, στηρίζεται σε ένα εξαιρετικά μικρής διάρκειας μέρος: κυρίως στο αρχικό θέμα, κατόπιν στο δεύτερο θέμα που εισάγεται από την ορχήστρα, με τον αλέγκρο ρυθμό της, και τέλος – εμφανίζεται λίγο αλλά καταλυτικά – μια ευγενής ιδέα που υποβάλλεται από τα έγχορδα, ένα τέταρτο περίπου από τη συνολική διάρκεια. Με δεδομένη μια τέτοια γκάμα διαλόγου σε θέματα αρμονίας, υφής και αλληλεπίδρασης, τρία μικρά θέματα είναι αρκετά να σταθούν ως μεγαλειώδεις συνθέσεις. Η cadenza του Μπετόβεν, απόλυτα θεματική, παρέχει στο πιάνο τη δυνατότητα να συνοψίσει.

Μετά την ορφική αργή κίνηση, το Rondo μιμείται τον πλούτο της πρώτης κίνησης, αλλά τώρα ο διάλογος είναι πιο εύγλωττος, καθώς ενδυναμώνεται με την ατμόσφαιρα ενός μαρς και ενός χορού. Έχει ωστόσο και τις ιδιαίτερες στιγμές του, αν μη τι άλλο, όταν η φωνή της ορχήστρας μοιράζεται στις βιόλες που ομιλούν – σωστότερα, τραγουδούν – θερμά, σε τρίτες.

Πηγή: ecm.mikri-arktos.gr



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Piano Concerto No.4 in G major, Op.58 (1805-1806)


i. Allegro moderato

ii. Andante con moto
iii. Rondo – Vivace

Mitsuko Uchida, piano


Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

Conductor: Mariss Jansons

London, Royal Albert Hall, BBC Proms 2013


High definition video with high quality audio
Βίντεο υψηλής ευκρίνειας με υψηλή ποιότητα ήχου

(HD 1080p)

Uploaded on Youtube for the Blog "Faces of Classical Music"
Δημοσιεύτηκε στο Youtube για λογαριασμό του Blog «Πρόσωπα της Κλασικής Μουσικής»

First publication: February 21, 2014 / Πρώτη δημοσίευση: 21 Φεβρουαρίου 2014
Last update: October 19, 2016 / Τελευταία ενημέρωση: 19 Οκτωβρίου 2016


Photo by Klaus Rudolph
Legendary pianist Mitsuko Uchida brings a deep insight into the music she plays through her own quest for truth and beauty. Renowned for her interpretations of Mozart, Schubert, Schumann and Beethoven, she has also illuminated the music of Berg, Schoenberg, Webern and Boulez for a new generation of listeners.

In 2016 Mitsuko Uchida was appointed an Artistic Partner to the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and began a series of concerts directing Mozart concerti from the keyboard in extensive tours of major European venues and Japan. Other recent highlights included an acclaimed performance of the Schönberg piano concerto with the London Philharmonic and Vladimir Jurowski at the 2015 BBC Proms, play-directing the Cleveland Orchestra in performances at Severance Hall and Carnegie Hall, and two appearances at the 2016 Baden-Baden Festival with the Berlin Philharmonic and Simon Rattle. Recital tours in 2016 included the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Théâtre des Champs Elysées, the Vienna Konzerthaus, the Royal Festival Hall and Carnegie Hall. With a strong commitment to chamber music, Mitsuko Uchida collaborates closely with the world’s finest musicians. Following concerts with Dorothea Röschmann, the Ebène Quartet and Magdalena Kožená in 2015, Uchida also appeared in chamber music programmes with members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the United States, and with Jörg Widmann and members of the Mahler Chamber Orchestra in a residency at the Alte Oper in Frankfurt.

In 2017 Mitsuko Uchida will embark on a Schubert Sonata series, featuring 12 of Schubert's major works which she will tour throughout Europe and North America. She will also return to the Salzburg and Edinburgh Festivals and appear with the Berlin Philharmonic and Simon Rattle, the Chicago Symphony and Riccardo Muti and the Orchestra of Santa Cecilia and Antonio Pappano.

Mitsuko Uchida's loyal relationship with the finest orchestras and concert halls has resulted in numerous residencies. She has been Artist-in-Residence at the Cleveland Orchestra and at the Berlin Philharmonic, the Vienna Konzerthaus, Salzburg Mozartwoche and Lucerne Festival. Carnegie Hall dedicated to her a Perspectives series entitled "Mitsuko Uchida: Vienna Revisited" and the Concertgebouw a Carte Blanche series.

Mitsuko Uchida records exclusively for Decca. Her extensive discography includes the complete Mozart and Schubert piano sonatas. Since 2011 Uchida has been recording Mozart's Piano Concerti with the Cleveland Orchestra live in concert and directing from the piano. The first release won a Grammy Award in 2011. The last instalment featuring concerti K.453 and K.503 is scheduled to be released in autumn 2016. Her recording of the Schoenberg Piano Concerto with Pierre Boulez and the Cleveland Orchestra won four awards, including The Gramophone Award for Best Concerto.

Highly committed to aiding the development of young musicians, Mitsuko Uchida is a trustee of the Borletti-Buitoni Trust and Director of the Marlboro Music Festival. In June 2009 she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In May 2012 she was awarded the Royal Philharmonic Society's Gold Medal and in 2014 received an Honorary Degree from the University of Cambridge. A guest of honour at the Salzburg Mozartwoche in 2015, Mitsuko Uchida was awarded the Golden Mozart Medal. In October 2015, she received the Premium Imperiale Award from the Japan Arts Association.

Source: mitsukouchida.com / July 2016




























More photos

No comments:

Post a Comment