Sofia Gubaidulina, composer

Sofia Gubaidulina, composer
Sofia Gubaidulina

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Sofia Gubaidulina: Et Exspecto – José Valente (HD 1080p)














The Portuguese accordionist José Valente plays Sofia Gubaidulina's Et exspecto. The recital took place at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, Concert Hall, in Copenhagen on April 25, 2018.



Born in 1931, Gubaidulina stubbornly continued composing in her own way, often expressing Christian ideas, against the often active pressure of the Soviet Communist Party. Since the 1980s she has emerged as one of the leading composers in Russia. Work in the 1970s with an ensemble of traditional instruments (for which the composers associated with it wrote non-traditional classical music), interested her in the bayan, a Russian folk accordion, and from that grew her interest in the accordion. Of all the leading composers in the world she has probably written more great new music for that often maligned instrument, often working with the great player Friedrich Lips, who has reformed the playing technique of the accordion.

The title "Et expecto" implies the Latin version of the statement from the Christian Credo, "And I expect the Resurrection of the dead". However, there is no explicit program for the work. Musically, the work grows out of the quality Guibaidulina most admires in the accordion, the fact that it is practically unique among instruments with keyboards in that it breathes. Rhythms of breathing and variations of these form the structure of the five-movement, eighteen-minute work. Harmonies range from chorale-like to moth static and moving chord clusters, and the work exploits a number of sound effects possible on the accordion.

Source: Joseph Stevenson (allmusic.com)


Sofia Gubaidulina (b. 1931)

♪ Et exspecto (1985)


i. Quarter Note = c. 116

ii. 7/16 = 36
iii. Presto
iv. Quarter Note = 116
v. Con moto

José Valente, accordion

Video: Klavs Kehlet Hansen

Royal Danish Academy of Music, Concert Hall, April 25, 2018


(HD 1080p)
















Sofia Gubaidulina was born in Chistopol in the Tatar Republic of the Soviet Union in 1931. After instruction in piano and composition at the Kazan Conservatory, she studied composition with Nikolai Peiko at the Moscow Conservatory, pursuing graduate studies there under Vissarion Shebalin. Until 1992, she lived in Moscow. Since then, she has made her primary residence in Germany, outside Hamburg.

Gubaidulina's compositional interests have been stimulated by the tactile exploration and improvisation with rare Russian, Caucasian, and Asian folk and ritual instruments collected by the "Astreia" ensemble, of which she was a co-founder, by the rapid absorption and personalization of contemporary Western musical techniques (a characteristic, too, of other Soviet composers of the post-Stalin generation including Edison Denisov and Alfred Schnittke), and by a deep-rooted belief in the mystical properties of music.


Her uncompromising dedication to a singular vision did not endear her to the Soviet musical establishment, but her music was championed in Russia by a number of devoted performers including Vladimir Tonkha, Friedrich Lips, Mark Pekarsky, and Valery Popov. The determined advocacy of Gidon Kremer, dedicatee of Gubaidulina's masterly violin concerto, Offertorium, helped bring the composer to international attention in the early 1980s. Gubaidulina is the author of symphonic and choral works, two cello concerti, a viola concerto, four string quartets, a string trio, works for percussion ensemble, and many works for nonstandard instruments and distinctive combinations of instruments. Her scores frequently explore unconventional techniques of sound production.


Since 1985, when she was first allowed to travel to the West, Gubaidulina's stature in the world of contemporary music has skyrocketed. She has been the recipient of prestigious commissions from the Berlin, Helsinki, and Holland Festivals, the Library of Congress, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and many other organizations and ensembles. A major triumph was the premiere in 2002 of the monumental two-part cycle, Passion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ according to St John, commissioned respectively by the International Bachakademie Stuttgart and the Norddeutschen Rundfunk, Hamburg.


Gubaidulina made her first visit to North America in 1987 as a guest of Louisville's "Sound Celebration." She has returned many times since as a featured composer of festivals – Boston's "Making Music Together" (1988), Vancouver's "New Music" (1991), Tanglewood (1997), Marlboro (2016) – and for other performance milestones. In May 2011, she was feted on the occasion of her 80th birthday in concerts presented by the California Institute of the Arts and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. From the retrospective concert by Continuum (New York, 1989) to the world premieres of commissioned works – Pro et Contra by the Louisville Orchestra (1989), String Quartet No.4 by the Kronos Quartet (New York, 1994), Dancer on a Tightrope by Robert Mann and Ursula Oppens (Washington, DC, 1994), the Viola Concerto by Yuri Bashmet with the Chicago Symphony conducted by Kent Nagano (1997), Two Paths ("A Dedication to Mary and Martha") for two solo violas and orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Kurt Masur (1999), Light of the End by the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Masur (2003), and Pilgrims for violin, double bass, piano and two percussionists (2015) by Chicago's Contempo Ensemble – the accolades of American critics have been ecstatic.


In January 2007, Gubaidulina was the first woman composer to be spotlighted by the BBC during its annual "composer weekend" in London. Among her most recent compositions are Feast During a Plague (2005), jointly commissioned by the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra – and conducted in Philadelphia by Sir Simon Rattle and in Pittsburgh and New York by Sir Andrew Davis – In Tempus Praesens, a violin concerto unveiled at the 2007 Lucerne Festival by Anne-Sophie Mutter with the Berlin Philharmonic under the baton of Rattle, and Glorious Percussion, a concerto for five solo percussionists and orchestra premiered in 2008 by Gustavo Dudamel and the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra.


Gubaidulina is a member of the Akademie der Künste in Berlin, the Royal Music Academy in Stockholm and of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecila in Rome. She has been the recipient of the Prix de Monaco (1987), the Premio Franco Abbiato (1991), the Heidelberger Künstlerinnenpreis (1991), the Russian State Prize (1992), and the SpohrPreis (1995). Recent awards include the prestigious Praemium Imperiale in Japan (1998), the Sonning Prize in Denmark (1999), the Polar Music Prize in Sweden (2002), the Living Composer Prize of the Cannes Classical Awards (2003), the Great Distinguished Service Cross of the Order of Merit with Star of the Federal Republic of Germany (2009), the "Golden Lion" for Lifetime Achievement of the Venice Bieniale (2013), and the Prix de l'Académie Royale de Belgique (2014). In 2005, she was elected as a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Yale University (2009) and the University of Chicago (2011).


Her music is now generously represented on compact disc, and Gubaidulina has been honored twice with the coveted Koussevitzky International Recording Award. Major releases have appeared on the DG, Chandos, Philips, Sony Classical, BIS, Berlin Classics and Naxos labels.


Source: musicsalesclassical.com















José Valente was born in Lisbon in 1989. He began his musical studies at the age of 10, under the guidance of Professor Paulo Jorge Ferreira, at the Conservatório Municipal D. Dinis, Odivelas. At 18, he was admitted at Escola Superior de Artes Aplicadas do Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco (ESART), where he completed his Master in Music, in Accordion Specialization, in March 2013, under the guidance of teachers Paulo Jorge Ferreira and Maria Luísa Correia Castilho. In the academic year 2010/2011, the School awarded him a Scholarship Merit, for having obtained the best classification in Music's area. At this moment, his taking an Advanced Postgraduate Diploma – soloist, at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, under the guidance of the Norwegian accordionist Geir Draugsvoll.

José won several awards at national level: 1st prize at Concurso de Acordeão de Castelo Branco – Folefest (2008, junior category); 1st prize also at competition Folefest (2009, senior and chamber music category and 2012, chamber music category); 1st prize at 6º Concurso de Jovens Intérpretes de Caldas da Rainha (2009); 1st prize at competition Prémio Jovens Músicos 2014 (concert accordion category, advanced level); 1st prize ex-aequo at 17º Concurso de Interpretação do Estoril | Prémio El Corte Inglés (2015) and 1st prize on PIF 2016 – 41st Castelfidardo International Accordion Prize (Premio category). Also in competition PJM 2014, he got the European Union of Music Competitions for Youth prize (EMCY) and one Bolsa Gulbenkian from Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian. He was the first soloist accordionist to receive the EMCY prize. He also won the 3rd prize at the international competition Accordion Coupe Mondiale, in Scotland (2008, chamber music category). He has performed with Orquestra de Cordas de "G.B. Pergolesi" Conservatório de Fermo, Orquestra de Câmara de Cascais e Oeiras, Orquestra Clássica da Madeira, Orquestra Gulbenkian, Orquestra Sinfónica Metropolitana and Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, under the baton of the great conductors Cesário Costa, Daniele Giulio Moles, Nikolay Lalov, Pedro Carneiro and Olari Elts. He attended master classes led by renowned accordionists, including Claudio Jacomucci, Frédéric Deschamps, Friedrich Lips, Geir Draugsvoll, Mika Väyrynen, Paulo Jorge Ferreira, Vojin Vasovic and Yuri Shishkin. He has performed concerts abroad the country, particularly in Casa da Música, Centro Cultural de Belém, Gulbenkian, Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Palácio Foz, Palácio da Independência, Salão Nobre do Conservatório Nacional de Lisboa, Auditório Municipal Baltazar Dias, among many other places. He has also perfomed in many international music festivals, like Marvão International Music Festival (Marvão, Portugal), Dias da Música (Lisboa, Portugal), Akordeono Festivalis Vilnius (Vilnius, Lithuania), PIF Castelfidardo (Castelfidardo, Italy), among many other festivals.


In October 2014, his dissertation, Concert accordion in Portugal – perceptions and expectations, was edited by AvA Musical Editions. This study includes the participation of renowned Portuguese musicians: António Victorino d'Almeida, Carlos Marecos, Cristóvão Silva, Fernando Ribeiro, Joaquim Raposo, Paulo Jorge Ferreira, Sérgio Azevedo and Vitorino Matono.


Source: josesvalente.com







































More photos


See also


Sofia Gubaidulina: De Profundis – José Valente (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: The Canticle of the Sun – Gal Faganel, Slovenian Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putninš (HD 1080p)


Sofia Gubaidulina: Sieben Worte for cello, bayan and strings – Jean-Guihen Queyras, Geir Draugsvoll, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Per Kristian Skalstad (HD 1080p)


Sofia Gubaidulina: Fachwerk for bayan, percussion and string orchestra – Geir Draugsvoll, Hans-Kristian Kjos Sørensen, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra,Terje Tønnesen (HD 1080p)

Monday, July 16, 2018

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor "Pathétique" – San Francisco Symphony, Michael Tilson Thomas (Download 44.1kHz/16bit)























The Backstory. At its premiere, Piotr Ilych Tchaikovsky's (1840-1893) Pathétique was not received with contemptuous silence, like Brahms's First Piano Concerto, nor did it elicit anything like a Sacre-sized scandale; rather, the occasion was that always depressing event, a succès d'estime. Tchaikovsky put it this way in a letter to his publisher, Piotr Jürgenson: "It is very strange about this symphony. It was not exactly a failure, but it was received with some hesitation".

We can only guess at the reasons. It is nearly impossible now to imagine encountering the Pathétique for the first time and as a new piece, but if we can make that leap we might see how an Adagio finale with a close on cellos and basses alone could have been puzzling and somehow "unfinal". Another factor would have been a weakness in the presentation. Tchaikovsky, though he lacked a performer's temperament, had become an efficient conductor by the end of his life; he was, however, always affected by an orchestra's mood, and the Saint Petersburg players' initial coolness to the new score depressed him and sapped his enthusiasm for the task. At the second performance, which was under the baton of the excellent Eduard Nápravník, the Pathétique made a powerful impression.

Between the two first performances of the Pathétique there was a difference beyond Nápravník's commanding presence on the podium. Tchaikovsky had died twelve days before, and that was something the audience could not stop thinking about as they bathed in what the English writer Martin Cooper called the "voluptuous gloom" of this all but posthumous symphony. Black drapery and a bust modeled after Tchaikovsky's death mask heightened the atmosphere.

Tchaikovsky had died of cholera. There was an epidemic in Saint Petersburg, or at least a scare, and he had drunk a glass of unboiled water, fallen ill, and died four days later. There is little concord in the various accounts of when and where Tchaikovsky made that fatal mistake. In 1979, a Russian émigré musicologist, Alexandra Orlova, published an article in the English journal Music and Letters, claiming that Tchaikovsky had committed suicide by poison on order from a "court of honor" consisting of several of his fellow alumni of the School of Jurisprudence, where the composer had studied in the 1850s. They supposedly feared disgrace to their alma mater, anticipating the disclosure of a liaison between Tchaikovsky and a young nobleman. The story gained wider circulation as Orlova published further articles, but three years later the suicide theory drew a rebuttal focusing on the shaky foundations of her account with respect to information, interpretation, and the rules of evidence. And so we are back with that old acquaintance from so many program notes, the glass of unboiled water.

At the premiere of the Pathétique, fellow composer Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov asked Tchaikovsky "whether he had a program for this composition. He replied that there was one, of course, but that he did not wish to announce it". In February 1893, Tchaikovsky had written to his nephew Bob Davidov that he was working on his new symphony with such ardor that it had taken him only four days to write the sketch of the first movement and that the rest of the score was already clearly outlined in his head. The new piece, he added, would have a program, "but a program of a kind that would remain an enigma to all – let them guess, but the symphony will just be called Program Symphony (No.6), Symphonie à Programme (No.6), Eine Programm Symphonie (No.6). This program is saturated with subjective feeling, and often... while composing it in my mind, I shed many tears... Do not speak of this to anyone but [my brother] Modest".

The day after the premiere, Tchaikovsky decided that Program Symphony was silly as long as he did not intend to divulge the program. Modest suggested Tragic, but Piotr Ilyich was not persuaded. "Suddenly the word patetichesky came into my head", Modest writes. "I went back and – I remember as if it were yesterday – I stood in the doorway and uttered the word. ‘Excellent, Modya, bravo, patetichesky!’ and before my eyes he wrote on the score the title by which it has since been known." But Tchaikovsky changed his mind once again. The next day, October 30, he asked his publisher – the score with patetichesky was already on the way – "to put on the title page what stands below: To Vladimir Lvovich Davidov – No.6 – Composed by P. T." He added, "I hope it is not too late".

Jürgenson, who knew that a good title never hurt sales, ignored the request and sent the work out into the world as Symphonie pathétique. This title, then, which had the composer convinced for twenty-four hours anyway, did not get his final blessing. It is, however, permanently glued to the symphony and merits a moment’s consideration. Patetichesky and pathétique, as well as our own "pathetic", all come, by way of the Latin patheticus, from the Greek patheticos and ultimately from pathos, which means "suffering". The words do not, however, carry the same weight of meaning in these several languages. In English, we most often use the word in what dictionaries still list as its secondary meaning of "distressing and inadequate", and its familiarity in that sense colors and trivializes our response to Modest's title. Tchaikovsky's biographer John Warrack emphasizes that "the Russian word... carries more feeling of ‘passionate’ and ‘emotional’ in it than the English ‘pathetic’, and perhaps an overtone, which has largely vanished from our word, of... ‘suffering’".

Tchaikovsky had begun the year 1893 in some depression over the reception of The Nutcracker and his one-act opera Iolanthe, produced as a double bill at the Mariinsky Theater in Saint Petersburg in December 1892. He was also disappointed because a symphony begun the previous year had refused to jell. In addition, he was still pained by the sudden end his mysterious patroness and pen pal Nadezhda von Meck had put to their relationship two years before. On the other hand, the world sent signals of success – Corresponding Membership in the French Academy and an honorary doctorate from Cambridge – and there was the sweet pleasure of reaping greater success than Saint-Saëns at a concert they shared in London.

Above all, it was the not-yet Pathétique that gave him pleasure. As always, he had moments of doubt; in August he told Bob that the orchestration failed to realize his dreams and that he expected the work to be met with "abuse or at least misunderstanding". But even in that letter he conceded that he was "well pleased" with the symphony's contents, and in general his correspondence for that year indicates that he was composing with confidence and delight. "I certainly regard it as easily the best – and especially the most ‘sincere’ – of all my works, and I love it as I have never before loved one of my musical offspring", he told Bob. To the Grand Duke Constantine he wrote, "Without exaggeration, I have put my whole soul into this work". Even during the dispiriting rehearsals, he maintained that this was "the best thing I ever composed or ever shall compose".

The Music. Tchaikovsky begins with an extraordinary sound, that of a very low bassoon solo rising through the murk of double basses divided into two sections, with violas in their most sepulchral register adding their voices to the cadences. This and the beginning of the finale, which is at precisely the same tempo, are the symphony’s slowest passages. When this Adagio emerges into quicker motion it does so, unlike at the corresponding places in the Fourth and Fifth symphonies, in order to continue the same musical thought. Tchaikovsky stirs this nervous theme to a climax and then lovingly prepares the entrance of one his most famous – and beautiful – melodies, an utterly personal transformation of one of his favorite pieces, Don José's Flower Song in Carmen. He wants it played "tenderly, very songfully, and elastically".


The development is a fierce and accelerating storm. The recapitulation is folded into the last mutterings of this tempest and, since the nervous first theme has received much attention in the development, Tchaikovsky moves directly to the great melody, richly rescored. It is a powerfully original and effective plan, to follow an almost recklessly spacious exposition with a combined, and therefore compressed, development and recapitulation. This time the dying of the great melody leads to a solemn – and taut – coda in which a brass chorale is quietly intoned over tolling scales in plucked strings.

Tchaikovsky was a wonderful waltz composer – after his slght older contemporary Johann Strauss, Jr. in Vienna – the best of his time. He had put a real waltz into his Fifth Symphony; now he includes a curious and melancholic variant of one. His Eighteen Piano Pieces, Opus 72, written in the spring of 1893, include what he calls a Valse à cinq temps, a waltz in five beats. Here he gives us another such piece, done beautifully and with haunting grace. Each 5/4 measure is made up of two beats plus three, and you could turn the movement into a normal waltz by stretching the first beat of each measure to double its length.

How does this fit into the symphony’s program? Probably not at all, except insofar as it contributes another sort of tristful climate. This atmosphere, however, vanishes with the arrival of the next movement, a brilliant scherzo, full of strange flashes and thunders, that unveils itself as a fiery march. Here we become particularly aware of Tchaikovsky's mastery at achieving astonishing variety – and volume – with a most economically constituted orchestra.

Tchaikovsky's Fourth and Fifth symphonies are “fate” symphonies that end in triumph, the former because the artist finds salvation in embracing the simple life, the latter because he co-opts the “fate” theme and turns it into a victory march. The march in the Pathétique offers no affirmation; it does serve to set off more bitterly the lament of the finale. The second and third movements form a double intermezzo between the movements that carry the real burden of Tchaikovsky’s patetichesky program, but it is an intermezzo of immense dramatic power. (Deryck Cooke was the first to point out that the design of the Mahler Ninth is modeled on that of the Pathétique. The two gloom-pleased composers first met in January 1888 when Tchaikovsky came to Leipzig to conduct the Gewandhaus Orchestra.)

A great cry pierces the echo left by the last bang of the march. A new melody – in major – sets out to console, but its repetitions become obsessive and threatening, leading to catastrophe. From its shards there rises the first, lamenting melody. The snarling of stopped horns and a single, soft stroke on the tam-tam are the tokens of disaster, the harbingers of defeat. The music, over a dying pulse, sinks back into that dark region where it had begun and moves beyond our hearing. Small wonder that it was a bewildering experience on October 28, 1893, and one that took on only too frightening a meaning just three weeks later.

Source: Michael Steinberg (CD Booklet)

















Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)

♪ Symphony No.6 in B minor "Pathétique", Op.74 (1893)

i. Adagio – Allegro non troppo
ii. Allegro con grazia
iii. Allegro molto vivace
iv. Finale. Adagio lamentoso

San Francisco Symphony
Conductor: Michael Tilson Thomas

Recorded live at Davies Symphony Hall – a venue of the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center, City and County of San Francisco – on March 1-4, 2017

© San Francisco Symphony, 2018


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Photo by Art Streiber
Michael Tilson Thomas first conducted the San Francisco Symphony in 1974 and has been Music Director since 1995. A Los Angeles native, he studied with John Crown and Ingolf Dahl at the University of Southern California, becoming Music Director of the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra at nineteen and working with Stravinsky, Boulez, Stockhausen, and Copland at the famed Monday Evening Concerts. In 1969, Mr. Tilson Thomas won the Koussevitzky Prize and was appointed Assistant Conductor of the Boston Symphony. Ten days later he came to international recognition, replacing Music Director William Steinberg in mid-concert at Lincoln Center. He went on to become the BSO's Principal Guest Conductor.

He has also served as Director of the Ojai Festival, Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic, and a Principal Guest Conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. With the London Symphony Orchestra he has served as Principal Conductor and Principal Guest Conductor; he is currently Conductor Laureate. He is the founder and Artistic Director of the New World Symphony, America's Orchestral Academy.

Michael Tilson Thomas’s recorded repertory reflects interests arising from work as conductor, composer, and pianist. His television credits include the New York Philharmonic Young People's Concerts, and in 2004 he and the San Francisco Symphony launched Keeping Score on PBS-TV. Among his honors are Columbia University's Ditson Award for services to American music and Musical America's Musician and Conductor of the Year award. He is a Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres of France, was selected as Gramophone 2005 Artist of the Year, inducted to the Gramophone Hall of Fame in 2015, named one of America's Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2010 was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama. Most recently he was elected to the Academy of Arts and Letters as an American Honorary Member.

Source: CD Booklet

















More photos


See also

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor "Pathétique" – hr-Sinfonieorchester, Lionel Bringuier

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor "Pathétique" – MusicAeterna, Teodor Currentzis (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor, "Pathétique" – Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Slatkin (HD 1080p)

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Sofia Gubaidulina: De Profundis – José Valente (HD 1080p)














The Portuguese accordionist José Valente plays Sofia Gubaidulina's De Profundis. The recital took place at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, Concert Hall, in Copenhagen on April 25, 2018.



Gubaidulina was born in the Tartar Republic, USSR, in 1931 and has become one of the most important composers of the last two decades of the Soviet Union and the first decade of the Russian Republic. Of all active major composers, she has shown the most interest in using the classical accordion. This interest may have grown from her involvement in the 1970s with a group of composers interested in assembling ancient and traditional instruments and writing highly modern classical music for them.

"De Profundis" is the opening of the Latin translation of the 130th Psalm, rendered in English as "Out of the depths (I call to Thee, O Lord)". The music begins in the instrument's lowest register and slowly ascends to its bright top notes. Various textures are used, from a chorale idea that represents hope, to a long single-line melody suggesting prayer. Unusual techniques are also used, from glissandi, shuddering vibratos and the sighing sound of the instrument's bellows. The work was written in consultation with the player Friederich Lips, who premiered it in Moscow in 1980.


Source: Joseph Stevenson (allmusic.com)


Sofia Gubaidulina (b. 1931)

♪ De Profundis (1978)


José Valente, accordion

Royal Danish Academy of Music, Concert Hall, April 25, 2018

(HD 1080p)


Sofia Gubaidulina was born in Chistopol in the Tatar Republic of the Soviet Union in 1931. After instruction in piano and composition at the Kazan Conservatory, she studied composition with Nikolai Peiko at the Moscow Conservatory, pursuing graduate studies there under Vissarion Shebalin. Until 1992, she lived in Moscow. Since then, she has made her primary residence in Germany, outside Hamburg.

Gubaidulina's compositional interests have been stimulated by the tactile exploration and improvisation with rare Russian, Caucasian, and Asian folk and ritual instruments collected by the "Astreia" ensemble, of which she was a co-founder, by the rapid absorption and personalization of contemporary Western musical techniques (a characteristic, too, of other Soviet composers of the post-Stalin generation including Edison Denisov and Alfred Schnittke), and by a deep-rooted belief in the mystical properties of music.


Her uncompromising dedication to a singular vision did not endear her to the Soviet musical establishment, but her music was championed in Russia by a number of devoted performers including Vladimir Tonkha, Friedrich Lips, Mark Pekarsky, and Valery Popov. The determined advocacy of Gidon Kremer, dedicatee of Gubaidulina's masterly violin concerto, Offertorium, helped bring the composer to international attention in the early 1980s. Gubaidulina is the author of symphonic and choral works, two cello concerti, a viola concerto, four string quartets, a string trio, works for percussion ensemble, and many works for nonstandard instruments and distinctive combinations of instruments. Her scores frequently explore unconventional techniques of sound production.


Since 1985, when she was first allowed to travel to the West, Gubaidulina's stature in the world of contemporary music has skyrocketed. She has been the recipient of prestigious commissions from the Berlin, Helsinki, and Holland Festivals, the Library of Congress, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and many other organizations and ensembles. A major triumph was the premiere in 2002 of the monumental two-part cycle, Passion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ according to St John, commissioned respectively by the International Bachakademie Stuttgart and the Norddeutschen Rundfunk, Hamburg.


Gubaidulina made her first visit to North America in 1987 as a guest of Louisville's "Sound Celebration." She has returned many times since as a featured composer of festivals – Boston's "Making Music Together" (1988), Vancouver's "New Music" (1991), Tanglewood (1997), Marlboro (2016) – and for other performance milestones. In May 2011, she was feted on the occasion of her 80th birthday in concerts presented by the California Institute of the Arts and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. From the retrospective concert by Continuum (New York, 1989) to the world premieres of commissioned works – Pro et Contra by the Louisville Orchestra (1989), String Quartet No.4 by the Kronos Quartet (New York, 1994), Dancer on a Tightrope by Robert Mann and Ursula Oppens (Washington, DC, 1994), the Viola Concerto by Yuri Bashmet with the Chicago Symphony conducted by Kent Nagano (1997), Two Paths ("A Dedication to Mary and Martha") for two solo violas and orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Kurt Masur (1999), Light of the End by the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Masur (2003), and Pilgrims for violin, double bass, piano and two percussionists (2015) by Chicago's Contempo Ensemble – the accolades of American critics have been ecstatic.


In January 2007, Gubaidulina was the first woman composer to be spotlighted by the BBC during its annual "composer weekend" in London. Among her most recent compositions are Feast During a Plague (2005), jointly commissioned by the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra – and conducted in Philadelphia by Sir Simon Rattle and in Pittsburgh and New York by Sir Andrew Davis – In Tempus Praesens, a violin concerto unveiled at the 2007 Lucerne Festival by Anne-Sophie Mutter with the Berlin Philharmonic under the baton of Rattle, and Glorious Percussion, a concerto for five solo percussionists and orchestra premiered in 2008 by Gustavo Dudamel and the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra.


Gubaidulina is a member of the Akademie der Künste in Berlin, the Royal Music Academy in Stockholm and of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecila in Rome. She has been the recipient of the Prix de Monaco (1987), the Premio Franco Abbiato (1991), the Heidelberger Künstlerinnenpreis (1991), the Russian State Prize (1992), and the SpohrPreis (1995). Recent awards include the prestigious Praemium Imperiale in Japan (1998), the Sonning Prize in Denmark (1999), the Polar Music Prize in Sweden (2002), the Living Composer Prize of the Cannes Classical Awards (2003), the Great Distinguished Service Cross of the Order of Merit with Star of the Federal Republic of Germany (2009), the "Golden Lion" for Lifetime Achievement of the Venice Bieniale (2013), and the Prix de l'Académie Royale de Belgique (2014). In 2005, she was elected as a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Yale University (2009) and the University of Chicago (2011).


Her music is now generously represented on compact disc, and Gubaidulina has been honored twice with the coveted Koussevitzky International Recording Award. Major releases have appeared on the DG, Chandos, Philips, Sony Classical, BIS, Berlin Classics and Naxos labels.


Source: musicsalesclassical.com
















José Valente was born in Lisbon in 1989. He began his musical studies at the age of 10, under the guidance of Professor Paulo Jorge Ferreira, at the Conservatório Municipal D. Dinis, Odivelas. At 18, he was admitted at Escola Superior de Artes Aplicadas do Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco (ESART), where he completed his Master in Music, in Accordion Specialization, in March 2013, under the guidance of teachers Paulo Jorge Ferreira and Maria Luísa Correia Castilho. In the academic year 2010/2011, the School awarded him a Scholarship Merit, for having obtained the best classification in Music's area. At this moment, his taking an Advanced Postgraduate Diploma – soloist, at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, under the guidance of the Norwegian accordionist Geir Draugsvoll.

José won several awards at national level: 1st prize at Concurso de Acordeão de Castelo Branco – Folefest (2008, junior category); 1st prize also at competition Folefest (2009, senior and chamber music category and 2012, chamber music category); 1st prize at 6º Concurso de Jovens Intérpretes de Caldas da Rainha (2009); 1st prize at competition Prémio Jovens Músicos 2014 (concert accordion category, advanced level); 1st prize ex-aequo at 17º Concurso de Interpretação do Estoril | Prémio El Corte Inglés (2015) and 1st prize on PIF 2016 – 41st Castelfidardo International Accordion Prize (Premio category). Also in competition PJM 2014, he got the European Union of Music Competitions for Youth prize (EMCY) and one Bolsa Gulbenkian from Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian. He was the first soloist accordionist to receive the EMCY prize. He also won the 3rd prize at the international competition Accordion Coupe Mondiale, in Scotland (2008, chamber music category). He has performed with Orquestra de Cordas de "G.B. Pergolesi" Conservatório de Fermo, Orquestra de Câmara de Cascais e Oeiras, Orquestra Clássica da Madeira, Orquestra Gulbenkian, Orquestra Sinfónica Metropolitana and Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, under the baton of the great conductors Cesário Costa, Daniele Giulio Moles, Nikolay Lalov, Pedro Carneiro and Olari Elts. He attended master classes led by renowned accordionists, including Claudio Jacomucci, Frédéric Deschamps, Friedrich Lips, Geir Draugsvoll, Mika Väyrynen, Paulo Jorge Ferreira, Vojin Vasovic and Yuri Shishkin. He has performed concerts abroad the country, particularly in Casa da Música, Centro Cultural de Belém, Gulbenkian, Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Palácio Foz, Palácio da Independência, Salão Nobre do Conservatório Nacional de Lisboa, Auditório Municipal Baltazar Dias, among many other places. He has also perfomed in many international music festivals, like Marvão International Music Festival (Marvão, Portugal), Dias da Música (Lisboa, Portugal), Akordeono Festivalis Vilnius (Vilnius, Lithuania), PIF Castelfidardo (Castelfidardo, Italy), among many other festivals.

In October 2014, his dissertation, Concert accordion in Portugal – perceptions and expectations, was edited by AvA Musical Editions. This study includes the participation of renowned Portuguese musicians: António Victorino d'Almeida, Carlos Marecos, Cristóvão Silva, Fernando Ribeiro, Joaquim Raposo, Paulo Jorge Ferreira, Sérgio Azevedo and Vitorino Matono.

Source: josesvalente.com








































More photos


See also


Sofia Gubaidulina: Et Exspecto – José Valente (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: The Canticle of the Sun – Gal Faganel, Slovenian Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putninš (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: Sieben Worte for cello, bayan and strings – Jean-Guihen Queyras, Geir Draugsvoll, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Per Kristian Skalstad (HD 1080p)


Sofia Gubaidulina: Fachwerk for bayan, percussion and string orchestra – Geir Draugsvoll, Hans-Kristian Kjos Sørensen, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra,Terje Tønnesen (HD 1080p)

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Sebastian Fritsch plays Robert Schumann and Bohuslav Martinů (HD 1080p)














The 21-year-old German cellist Sebastian Fritsch, the winner of the 2018 Tonali competition, and the Japanese pianist Keiko Tamura perform Robert Schumann's Cello Concerto in A minor, Op.129 (Version for cello and piano, 1st movement), and Bohuslav Martinů's Variations on a Theme of Rossini for cello and piano, H. 290. The two concerts took place at the Grand Hotel Quellenhof & Spa Suites, in Bad Ragaz, Switzerland, the first on March 1, 2018, and the second on September 15, 2016.


Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

♪ Cello Concerto in A minor, Op.129 (Version for cello and piano) (1850)

i. Nicht zu schnell

Sebastian Fritsch, cello
Keiko Tamura, piano

Switzerland, Bad Ragaz, Grand Hotel Quellenhof & Spa Suites, March 1, 2018

(HD 1080p)



Bohuslav Martinů (1890-1959)

♪ Variations on a Theme of Rossini for cello and piano, H. 290 (1942)

i. Theme. Poco Allegro – Allegro Moderato
ii. Variation I. Poco Allegro
iii. Variation II. Poco Piu Allegro
iv. Variation III. Andante
v. Variation IV. Allegro – Vivo – Moderato Maestoso

Sebastian Fritsch, cello
Keiko Tamura, piano

Switzerland, Bad Ragaz, Grand Hotel Quellenhof & Spa Suites, September 15, 2016

(HD 1080p)















Sebastian Fritsch, born in Stuttgart in 1996, has been studying cello with Professor Jean-Guihen Queyras at the University of Music Freiburg since 2014, where he was awarded a scholarship from the Helene Rosenberg Foundation. He also receives a scholarship from the International Academy of Music in Liechtenstein, and participates in the intensive music weeks held there.

The young cellist has gained further musical insights from working with musicians such as Jens Peter Maintz, Wen-Sinn Yang, Maria Kliegel and Lucas Fels. He also continues to work with Lisa Neßling, who has taught him for many years.


Sebastian Fritsch has been a finalist and won prizes in various national and international competitions. As a soloist he has already performed Haydn's cello concertos, Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme, the Saint-Saëns cello concerto and the Dvorak cello concerto with orchestras including the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, under the baton of Matthias Foremny. He has also been invited to perform at the Cello Biënnale Amsterdam, the Salzburg Festival, at the opening of the Illertissen Music Festival "Junge Talente – Stars von Morgen" and at the Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival.


The young cellist met his chamber music partners Rosa Wember (violin) and Robert Neumann (piano) in the class for exceptionally gifted young musicians at the Stuttgart School of Music. Together with Rosa Wember, he founded the "Stuttgarter Kammerduo" in 2010, with which he has performed in several countries, including the USA, Italy and Germany. In 2015 the duo accompanied the Vienna Boys' Choir on tour and were accepted into the Yehudi Menuhin Foundation's "Live Music Now" scholarship programme.


Sebastian Fritsch plays a Thorsten Theis cello built in 2015.


Source: musikakademie.li (September 2016)








































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Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Cellist Sebastian Fritsch wins Tonali 2018

Sebastian Fritsch performs at the Tonali final at Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie
















The 21-year-old German cellist Sebastian Fritsch took home the first prize and audience prize in Hamburg competition with performance of Schumann concerto

Sebastian Fritsch, from Stuttgart, is the winner of the 2018 Tonali competition, taking the €10,000 first prize, plus additional €3,000 audience prize.

Fritsch, who studies with Jean-Guihen Queyras at the Hochschule für Musik Freiburg, performed the Robert Schumann's Cello Concerto in A minor in the final at Hamburg's Elbphilharmonie concert hall, with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen conducted by Joshua Weilerstein.

He also won the Mariinsky Orchestra special prize, which will see him perform as part of The Stars of the White Nights festival in St Petersburg.

Runner-up Bryan Cheng, and third placed Manuel Lipstein won €5,000 and €3,000 respectively.

Held annually, the Tonali competition concentrates each year on one of three instruments: violin, cello and piano. Open to musicians residing in Germany between the ages of 16 and 21, the contest includes community performance elements, matching each of its 12 finalists with a different local school.

Source: thestrad.com

















Sebastian Fritsch, born in Stuttgart in 1996, has been studying cello with Professor Jean-Guihen Queyras at the University of Music Freiburg since 2014, where he was awarded a scholarship from the Helene Rosenberg Foundation. He also receives a scholarship from the International Academy of Music in Liechtenstein, and participates in the intensive music weeks held there.

The young cellist has gained further musical insights from working with musicians such as Jens Peter Maintz, Wen-Sinn Yang, Maria Kliegel and Lucas Fels. He also continues to work with Lisa Neßling, who has taught him for many years.

Sebastian Fritsch has been a finalist and won prizes in various national and international competitions. As a soloist he has already performed Haydn's cello concertos, Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme, the Saint-Saëns cello concerto and the Dvorak cello concerto with orchestras including the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, under the baton of Matthias Foremny. He has also been invited to perform at the Cello Biënnale Amsterdam, the Salzburg Festival, at the opening of the Illertissen Music Festival "Junge Talente – Stars von Morgen" and at the Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival.

The young cellist met his chamber music partners Rosa Wember (violin) and Robert Neumann (piano) in the class for exceptionally gifted young musicians at the Stuttgart School of Music. Together with Rosa Wember, he founded the "Stuttgarter Kammerduo" in 2010, with which he has performed in several countries, including the USA, Italy and Germany. In 2015 the duo accompanied the Vienna Boys' Choir on tour and were accepted into the Yehudi Menuhin Foundation's "Live Music Now" scholarship programme.

Sebastian Fritsch plays a Thorsten Theis cello built in 2015.

Source: musikakademie.li (September 2016)

















More photos


See also

Sebastian Fritsch plays Robert Schumann and Bohuslav Martinů (HD 1080p)

Monday, July 09, 2018

Sofia Gubaidulina: The Canticle of the Sun – Gal Faganel, Slovenian Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putninš (HD 1080p)














Under the baton of the Latvian conductor Kaspars Putninš, the Slovenian Chamber Choir and the soloists Gal Faganel (cello), Barbara Kresnick and Matevž Bajde (percussion), and Aleksandra Verbicka (celesta) perform Sofia Gubaidulina's Sonnengesang (The Canticle of the Sun). Recorded at Slovenian Philharmonic, Marjan Kozina Hall, on January 26, 2014.



Sofia Gubaidulina is unquestionably a modernist and employs a wide spectrum of contemporary techniques, but she is also a mystic, so her music tends to convey a striving for transcendence that's expressed in luminous warmth.

The Canticle of the Sun for cello, chamber choir, percussion and celesta was dedicated to Mstislav Rostropovich, who gave its premiere in 1998. The unique orchestration gives it an atmosphere of luminous, ethereal mystery. She wanted to pay tribute to the cellist's famously sunny disposition, and it has sections that make one of her most exuberant works; the cello sends major chords rocketing through the first movement and there is a furiously powerful roar of ecstasy at the end of the second movement. The piece ends in the major, in an exquisitely delicate filigree of interwoven lines.

Source: Stephen Eddins (allmusic.com)


Sofia Gubaidulina (b. 1931)

♪ The Canticle of the Sun (Sonnengesang) (1997)

i. Glorification of the Creator, and His Creations: the Sun and the Moon
ii. Glorification of the Creator, the Maker of the Four Elements: Air, Water, Fire and Earth
iii. Glorification of Life
iv. Glorification of Death

Gal Faganel, cello
Barbara Kresnick, Matevž Bajde, percussion
Aleksandra Verbicka, celesta

Slovenian Chamber Choir
Conductor: Kaspars Putninš

Slovenian Philharmonic, Marjan Kozina Hall, January 26, 2014

(HD 1080p)


Sofia Gubaidulina was born in Chistopol in the Tatar Republic of the Soviet Union in 1931. After instruction in piano and composition at the Kazan Conservatory, she studied composition with Nikolai Peiko at the Moscow Conservatory, pursuing graduate studies there under Vissarion Shebalin. Until 1992, she lived in Moscow. Since then, she has made her primary residence in Germany, outside Hamburg.

Gubaidulina's compositional interests have been stimulated by the tactile exploration and improvisation with rare Russian, Caucasian, and Asian folk and ritual instruments collected by the "Astreia" ensemble, of which she was a co-founder, by the rapid absorption and personalization of contemporary Western musical techniques (a characteristic, too, of other Soviet composers of the post-Stalin generation including Edison Denisov and Alfred Schnittke), and by a deep-rooted belief in the mystical properties of music.


Her uncompromising dedication to a singular vision did not endear her to the Soviet musical establishment, but her music was championed in Russia by a number of devoted performers including Vladimir Tonkha, Friedrich Lips, Mark Pekarsky, and Valery Popov. The determined advocacy of Gidon Kremer, dedicatee of Gubaidulina's masterly violin concerto, Offertorium, helped bring the composer to international attention in the early 1980s. Gubaidulina is the author of symphonic and choral works, two cello concerti, a viola concerto, four string quartets, a string trio, works for percussion ensemble, and many works for nonstandard instruments and distinctive combinations of instruments. Her scores frequently explore unconventional techniques of sound production.


Since 1985, when she was first allowed to travel to the West, Gubaidulina's stature in the world of contemporary music has skyrocketed. She has been the recipient of prestigious commissions from the Berlin, Helsinki, and Holland Festivals, the Library of Congress, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and many other organizations and ensembles. A major triumph was the premiere in 2002 of the monumental two-part cycle, Passion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ according to St John, commissioned respectively by the International Bachakademie Stuttgart and the Norddeutschen Rundfunk, Hamburg.


Gubaidulina made her first visit to North America in 1987 as a guest of Louisville's "Sound Celebration." She has returned many times since as a featured composer of festivals – Boston's "Making Music Together" (1988), Vancouver's "New Music" (1991), Tanglewood (1997), Marlboro (2016) – and for other performance milestones. In May 2011, she was feted on the occasion of her 80th birthday in concerts presented by the California Institute of the Arts and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. From the retrospective concert by Continuum (New York, 1989) to the world premieres of commissioned works – Pro et Contra by the Louisville Orchestra (1989), String Quartet No.4 by the Kronos Quartet (New York, 1994), Dancer on a Tightrope by Robert Mann and Ursula Oppens (Washington, DC, 1994), the Viola Concerto by Yuri Bashmet with the Chicago Symphony conducted by Kent Nagano (1997), Two Paths ("A Dedication to Mary and Martha") for two solo violas and orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Kurt Masur (1999), Light of the End by the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Masur (2003), and Pilgrims for violin, double bass, piano and two percussionists (2015) by Chicago's Contempo Ensemble – the accolades of American critics have been ecstatic.


In January 2007, Gubaidulina was the first woman composer to be spotlighted by the BBC during its annual "composer weekend" in London. Among her most recent compositions are Feast During a Plague (2005), jointly commissioned by the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra – and conducted in Philadelphia by Sir Simon Rattle and in Pittsburgh and New York by Sir Andrew Davis – In Tempus Praesens, a violin concerto unveiled at the 2007 Lucerne Festival by Anne-Sophie Mutter with the Berlin Philharmonic under the baton of Rattle, and Glorious Percussion, a concerto for five solo percussionists and orchestra premiered in 2008 by Gustavo Dudamel and the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra.


Gubaidulina is a member of the Akademie der Künste in Berlin, the Royal Music Academy in Stockholm and of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecila in Rome. She has been the recipient of the Prix de Monaco (1987), the Premio Franco Abbiato (1991), the Heidelberger Künstlerinnenpreis (1991), the Russian State Prize (1992), and the SpohrPreis (1995). Recent awards include the prestigious Praemium Imperiale in Japan (1998), the Sonning Prize in Denmark (1999), the Polar Music Prize in Sweden (2002), the Living Composer Prize of the Cannes Classical Awards (2003), the Great Distinguished Service Cross of the Order of Merit with Star of the Federal Republic of Germany (2009), the "Golden Lion" for Lifetime Achievement of the Venice Bieniale (2013), and the Prix de l'Académie Royale de Belgique (2014). In 2005, she was elected as a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Yale University (2009) and the University of Chicago (2011).


Her music is now generously represented on compact disc, and Gubaidulina has been honored twice with the coveted Koussevitzky International Recording Award. Major releases have appeared on the DG, Chandos, Philips, Sony Classical, BIS, Berlin Classics and Naxos labels.


Source: musicsalesclassical.com



Gal Faganel (b. 1979, Ljubljana, Slovenia) is an acclaimed cello performer, teacher, coach, and recording artist. He has been praised in the press for his "exceptionally sensitive interpretation" (Slovenec – Slovenia), his "powerful and beautiful tone" (Dornse Krant – Netherlands), and his "brilliant virtuosity and youthful vigor" (Primorske Novice – Slovenia).

As a performer, Faganel is frequently heard in recital, in chamber music concerts, and as a soloist with orchestra throughout North America and Europe. He is the founder and artistic director of the Arizona Chamber Orchestra, a conductor-less ensemble founded in 2009. Until 2010 he served as the acting principal cellist of the Phoenix Symphony. As a member of the Tetraktys String Quartet, he toured in the United States and Europe. He has also performed extensively with various other chamber ensembles.

Faganel is currently an assistant professor at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) in Greeley, where he greatly enjoys teaching cello and coaching chamber music. Prior to his appointment at UNC, he taught at Scottsdale Community College and the University of Southern California. He regularly conducts master classes and teaches at summer music programs in the United States and Europe. At UNC, Faganel has received several grants for travel, research, and performances in four continents. Innovative teaching approaches utilizing video conferencing technology allow Faganel to be accessible to students worldwide.

At age 13, Faganel won his first competition; he received first prize in the international competition Alpe Adria "Alfredo Marcosig" in Italy at age 15. In addition to winning three other international competitions, including the International Cello Competition "Antonio Janigro" in Croatia, he won the American String Teacher's Association Competition in California and the Slovenian National Competition as a soloist and with piano trio. In 1997 he was named "Young Musician of the Year" in Slovenia. The following year he won a national competition to represent Slovenia at the European Broadcasting Union – Eurovision Competition in Lisbon, Portugal.

In 2006, Faganel began researching, cataloging, performing, and recording music for cello by Slovenian composers. He has completed two of the five planned CDs published by Astrum. The project has been supported by the Slovenian government and UNC. He has also done live broadcasts and archival recordings for National Radio Slovenia, Holland Radio, Classical KUSC in Los Angeles, and KBAQ in Phoenix.

Gal grew up in a musical family and announced the desire to play cello at age three. When he was eight years old he began studying cello in his native Slovenia. He continued his studies in Croatia, where his appearance in an international competition led to an invitation and a full-tuition scholarship to study at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. His university studies culminated ten years later with a Doctor of Musical Arts degree. His mentors include Eleonore Schoenfeld, Nathaniel Rosen, Daniel Rothmuller, Peter Marsh, and Dobrila Berković-Magdalenić. He collaborated with and learned from many renowned conductors and soloists, including Sergiu Comissiona, Zubin Mehta, Lionel Friend, Carl St. Clair, Yo-Yo Ma, Lynn Harrel, Midori Goto, Isaac Stern, Joshua Bell, Itzak Perlman and Pavel Vernikov.

Source: galfaganel.com







































More photos


See also


Sofia Gubaidulina: Et Exspecto – José Valente (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: De Profundis – José Valente (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: Sieben Worte for cello, bayan and strings – Jean-Guihen Queyras, Geir Draugsvoll, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Per Kristian Skalstad (HD 1080p)

Sofia Gubaidulina: Fachwerk for bayan, percussion and string orchestra – Geir Draugsvoll, Hans-Kristian Kjos Sørensen, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra,Terje Tønnesen (HD 1080p)