1985

1985 (2018) – A film by Yen Tan – Cory Michael Smith, Virginia Madsen, Michael Chiklis, Jamie Chung

Monday, March 18, 2019

1985 (2018) – A film by Yen Tan – Cory Michael Smith, Virginia Madsen, Michael Chiklis, Jamie Chung (Download the movie)















A sensitive drama that slowly builds in power, "1985" feels like a missing minor classic from the decade that preceded the rise of the so-called New Queer Cinema, when independent filmmakers had to struggle to cobble together budgets that let them tell their stories in the form of modest art house movies. Although it builds on decades of similar movies, this tale of a young gay New Yorker (Cory Michael Smith of TV's "Gotham") who comes home to North Texas at Christmastime never plays like an exercise in stylistic mimicry. It feels immediate and rings true, thanks to the performances of its lead actors, and the storytelling of director Yen Tan and his co-writer, co-editor, and cinematographer, the single-named Hutch.

Hutch's Super 16mm photography – with its pointillistic film grain dancing beneath the characters and their environments – instantly situates the viewer in 1985. This is how low-budget art house movies looked in the '80s and '90s. The lighting, clothes, and production design all further the sense that we're seeing a missing artifact from that era – along with 1985 signifiers like Walkmans and synth drums and references to Madonna, The Cure, Ronald Reagan, and Walter Mondale. But the filmmakers' attention to detail and deep respect for how these specific people would have communicated with each other are what put "1985" over the top. Despite the film's gay-themed story, its North Texas, working-class-suburban setting, and its constant talk of football and Jesus, the movie it most strongly evokes is "Ordinary People", a classic about repressed suburban white folks whose social conditioning stopped them from discussing their pain...
















1985 (2018)

A film by Yen Tan

Directed by Yen Tan
Story by Hutch and Yen Tan
Screenplay by Yen Tan

Starring
Cory Michael Smith..........Adrian
Virginia Madsen..........Eileen
Michael Chiklis..........Dale
Jamie Chung..........Carly
Aidan Langford..........Andrew
Ryan Piers Williams..........Marc
Michael Darby..........Leo
Bryan Massey..........Pastor Jon

Cinematography: Hutch
Edited: Yen Tan
Music: Curtis Heath

Production companies: Floren Shieh Productions, MuseLessMime Productions, RainMaker Films, Cranium Entertainment
Distributed: Wolfe Releasing, Peccadillo Pictures
Release date: 9 March 2018 (SXSW)
Country: United States
Language: English
Running time: 85 minutes


















...Adrian is back home in Fort Worth, Texas, visiting his parents, Dale and Eileen (Michael Chiklis and Virginia Madsen), and his kid brother Andrew (Aiden Langford), a middle schooler. Right away we sense that unspoken tension clouds the family's ability to communicate. We also deduce that the major characters know more about one another than they let on. There are strong hints that Adrian's fundamentalist Christian parents know that their eldest son is gay even though they haven't discussed it with him and are in no hurry to. We sense it in the way that Dale, a Vietnam veteran turned repairman who drives a pickup truck, awkwardly stands next to his son at the airport's baggage claim area, and in the hopeful, almost pleading way Eileen lights up when Adrian reveals that he's been hanging out with his high school girlfriend Carly (Jamie Chung), a Korean-American standup comic.

There are intimations that Andrew might be gay, too, and that he senses his own sexual orientation even though he doesn't have the language (or maybe the courage) to label it. Andrew is initially resentful of Adrian for reneging on an offer to host him in New York – the result of Adrian getting cold feet about the prospect of letting his kid brother see him living as an openly gay man – but he forgives his older brother the minute he starts talking about the new pop music they both love, and that their father has forbidden Andrew to listen to.

A climate of fear and repression clouds the home. Adrian's family are politically conservative religious people living in North Texas in 1985. They are enamored of a particular view of scripture that's hostile to anyone who isn't straight. Their preferred radio station talks of sin, damnation and salvation. Dale's Christmas gift to Adrian is a new Bible. During a supermarket shopping trip, another high school classmate of Adrian's who is now an assistant manager follows him outside and offers him a pumpkin pie in order to create an opening to apologize for past bad behavior. We don't need to hear the specifics to figure out that the classmate was cruel to Adrian for being gay, and feels bad about it now. Like so much in "1985", this moment shows us the outer edge of a confrontation or epiphany, then lets us fill in the rest with our imaginations, because that's how almost everybody in this world deals with each other.

The specter of AIDS looms over every scene. Adrian's lover recently perished of complications from the disease, and there are suggestions (which the film takes its time confirming or denying) that Adrian might've contracted it as well. A lot of Dale's (and to a lesser extent, Eileen's) discomfort with Adrian can be explained as basic homophobia, inherited from mainstream culture and amplified by their religion and geographic surroundings. But they're also scared that one of their sons will die from (in their minds) being gay. Their fear and hatred is fused to sincere and abiding love, and this sparks contradictory emotions that they can't even begin to deal with.

The lead performances are all thoughtful and honest, and Tan's direction is subtle. Adrian's drawl becomes more noticeable when he settles back into his old hometown. Dale's jawline sharpens when Adrian gives the family a series of lavish gifts at Christmas, hoping to prove how happy and comfortable his New York life is, but succeeding mainly in making his father feel poor. The camera keeps zooming into scenes very, very slowly, as if the film doesn't want its characters to realize that somebody is watching them.

There are perhaps a few too many wordless lyrical interludes, and they go on a shade longer than they needed to in order to make their point – something you could also say about the movie, which is in a hurry not to hurry – but these are small flaws. Each choice, small or large, furthers the film's story, themes, and sense of life – especially visually. Notice how whenever the characters open up, to the degree that they're able, Tan and Hutch's camera keeps its distance for as long as it can, as if to respect their privacy during a difficult time. A trio of intimate conversations between Adrian and Carly is conveyed mainly in medium shots. One of the most wrenching scenes – a backyard heart-to-heart talk between Adrian and Dale, who's drunk on beer and feeling both sentimental and resentful – spends four minutes framing the characters from head-to-toe before finally jumping into a closeup of Dale. When these characters break down and cry, the sight feels almost obscene, like a form of blasphemy.

Different as they are, Dale, Eileen and Adrian are united by a desire to return to a sentimentalized past that preceded the now. That's why Eileen's favorite secret spot to sleep in is Adrian's impeccably preserved bedroom, the place where she used to read to her sweet son before he hit puberty and started to figure out that he was different from the other boys at school. But you can't go back. After a certain point, you can't go forward anymore, either. Which means that the moment that matters most is the moment you're in, no matter what year it is.

Matt Zoller Seitz, October 26, 2018 (rogerebert.com)


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(Select 1985.2018.LiMiTED.1080p.BluRay.x264-CADAVER | Size: 6.56 GB | 
With English subtitles | Video: x264, 10180 Kbps | Frame Rate: 24 fps | Resolution: 1808x1080 | Audio: English 5.1ch DTS, 768 Kbps)

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Eastern Boys (2013) – A film by Robin Campillo – Olivier Rabourdin, Kirill Emelyanov, Danil Vorobyev (Download the movie)


Die Wand / The Wall (2012) – A film by Julian Roman Pölsler – Starring Martina Gedeck (Download the movie)


Mr. Gaga: A True Story of Love and Dance (2015) – A film by Tomer Heymann – Ohad Naharin and the Batsheva Dance Company (Download the movie)

Out in the Dark (2012) – A film by Michael Mayer – Nicholas Jacob, Michael Aloni, Jamil Khoury, Alon Pdut, Loai Nofi, Khawlah Hag-Debsy, Maysa Daw, Shimon Mimran (Download the movie)


Call Me by Your Name (2017) – A film by Luca Guadagnino – Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, Victoire Du Bois – James Ivory, Sayombhu Mukdeeprom (Download the movie)


Seashore (Beira-Mar), 2015 – A film by Filipe Matzembacher and Marcio Reolon – Mateus Almada, Maurício Barcellos, Elisa Brittes, Fernando Hart, Ariel Artur, Francisco Gick (Download the movie)


mother! (2017) – A film by Darren Aronofsky – Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, Michelle Pfeiffer (Download the movie)


Okja (2017) – A film by Bong Joon-ho – Ahn Seo-hyun, Tilda Swinton, Paul Dano, Steven Yeun, Jake Gyllenhaal, Giancarlo Esposito, Lily Collins, Shirley Henderson (Download the movie)


Im Keller / In the Basement (2014) – A film by Ulrich Seidl (Download the movie)


Maurice (1987) – A film by James Ivory – James Wilby, Hugh Grant, Rupert Graves (Download the movie)


Shostakovich Against Stalin: The War Symphonies – A Documentary by Larry Weinstein – Netherland Radio Philharmonic, Kirov Orchestra, Valery Gergiev (HD 1080p)


Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) – A film by Stephen Frears – Meryl Streep, Hugh Grant, Simon Helberg (Download the movie)


Son of Saul (2015) – A film by László Nemes – Géza Röhrig, Levente Molnár, Urs Rechn (Download the movie)


Amour (2012) – A film by Michael Haneke – Emmanuelle Riva, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Isabelle Huppert, Alexandre Tharaud (Download the movie)


Dmitri Shostakovich: Katerina Izmailova (Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk), 1966 – A film by Mikhail Shapiro – Galina Vishnevskaya, Konstantin Simeonov


The New Babylon (Novyy Vavilon), 1929 – A film by Grigori Kozintsev & Leonid Trauberg – Music by Dmitri Shostakovich (HD 1080p)


Farinelli (1994) – A film by Gérard Corbiau – Stefano Dionisi, Enrico Lo Verso, Elsa Zylberstein (Download the movie)


Eroica (The Movie, BBC 2003) by Simon Cellan Jones – Ian Hart, Leo Bill, Claire Skinner, Frank Finlay – John Eliot Gardiner (HD 1080p)


Tous les Matins du Monde / All the Mornings of the World / Όλα τα Πρωινά του Κόσμου (1991) – A film by Alain Corneau (Download the movie)


Death in Venice (1971) – A film by Luchino Visconti – Dirk Bogarde, Björn Andrésen, Silvana Mangano – Music by Gustav Mahler (Download the movie)















Friday, March 15, 2019

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor – Ivan Bessonov, Russian National Youth Symphony Orchestra, Dimitris Botinis (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Russian National Youth Symphony Orchestra under the baton of the Greek conductor Dimitris Botinis, the young award-winning Russian pianist Ivan Bessonov performs Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, Op.23. Recorded at Tchaikovsky Concert Hall in Moscow, on December 30, 2018.



Although Tchaikovsky was already an accomplished composer (having already produced his first two symphonies, a string quartet, and two notable tone poems, all of these successful and enduring works), he still sought the approval of mentors such as Balakirev and Nicolas Rubinstein. On Christmas Eve 1874 he played the concerto for Rubinstein (its intended soloist) in an empty classroom. Rubinstein responded with a torrent of castigation, made famous by Tchaikovsky's own recollection. Tchaikovsky slunk off in despair. Later Rubinstein called him back and detailed a list of changes that must be made by a certain date if Rubinstein were to perform it. Tchaikovsky wrote that he responded, "I shall not change a single note, and I shall publish the concerto as it is now". He continued in his reminiscence, "And this, indeed, I did". Well, not entirely. Although there are no really substantial changes, he did subject the concerto to some minor revision before it was printed, as happens with most compositions. The premiere fell to Hans von Bülow, who played it first in Boston, October 15, 1875. The audience was enraptured and demanded a repeat of the entire final movement. Von Bülow took the concerto back to Europe, where it was quickly added to the repertoire of other leading pianists; even Rubinstein started playing it in 1878. It has been a giant success, virtually the epitome of the romantic piano concerto, ever since.

The form of the concerto is lopsided: possessing a notably large scale introduction, the broad melodies of the first movement run its length out to nearly 25 minutes, more than the length of the two remaining movements combined. Its arresting opening horn call, with bold orchestral chords interrupting, leads immediately to one of the most recognizable and beloved of classical melodies, played by strings with rich harmonic support from the piano solo. Tchaikovsky initiates a great formal surprise by going straightway into a full-fledged cadenza for the piano solo, a powerful treatment of the theme. The strings then reassert the melody in its original form – and all this is only the introduction to the first movement proper. A lengthy introduction to be sure (106 measures), but once it ends, that's the last time in the concerto this music is used in any way. The movement proper is a full-scale sonata-allegro treatment of two themes, one reputedly a Ukrainian folk theme, the other a gentle romantic theme. There is great drama and passion in its working out; when it is all over one realizes that there is also a minimum (for Tchaikovsky) of angst and pathos.

The second movement is tender, beginning with pizzicato chords so quiet as to be almost whispers. A flute melody of young adolescent tenderness is the main theme of the movement. There is a central section with a delicate waltz.

The finale opens with a rushing string figure and a powerful drum stroke. The main theme is an arresting, galloping dance made up of many short phrases. Yet another romantic theme provides contrast.

Source: Joseph Stevenson (allmusic.com)



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)

♪ Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, Op.23 (1874-1875, 1879, 1888)

i. Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso – Allegro con spirito
ii. Andantino semplice – Prestissimo – Tempo I
iii. Allegro con fuoco – Molto meno mosso – Allegro vivo

Ivan Bessonov, piano

Russian National Youth Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Dimitris Botinis

Tchaikovsky Concert Hall, Moscow, December 30, 2018

(HD 1080p)

Uploaded on Youtube for the Blog "Faces of Classical Music"















Ivan Bessonov was born in St Petersburg in 2002. He received his first piano lessons at the age of six. In 2012 Ivan started his professional education and began studying piano at the Central Music School for particularly gifted children of the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Professor Vadim Rudenko.

In 2015 Ivan made his debut as a film music composer for various feature films. That same year he won the Grand Prix at the International Chopin Piano Competition in St Petersburg. In 2016 Ivan Bessonov won the 1st prize as well as the Audience Prize at the Grand Piano Competition in Moscow and was awarded the 1st prize at the International Anton Rubinstein Piano Competition The Piano Miniature in Russian Music in St Petersburg. His interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No.1 won him 1st prize at the Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Competition at the Edinburgh International Festival.

Since 2015 Ivan Bessonov has performed in recitals and with orchestras throughout Russia and Europe. Renowned conductors such as Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Fedoseev or Vladimir Spivakov invite him to perform with their orchestras, including the Mariinsky Orchestra, the Tchaikovsky Orchestra and the Russian National Philharmonic Orchestra.

He regularly performs at various music festivals in Russia and abroad, including the Easter Festival under Valery Gergiev in Moscow and St Petersburg, the Verbier Festival and the Festival de Piano de la Roque d'Antheron. In 2017 he gave a recital as part of the well-known concert series Masters of Tomorrow organised by the Werner Richard - Dr. Carl Dörken Foundation.

The famous pianist Denis Matsuev has also repeatedly invited Ivan to his festivals and concerts. He also performs as a jazz pianist and chamber musician in a trio with his younger brothers, the violinists Nikita and Danila, and furthermore works with great passion as a composer.

Ivan Bessonov has recorded his own compositions and works by Frédéric Chopin for his debut album, which will be released on the ARS Produktion label in spring 2019.

Source: mb-concerts.com















Dimitris Botinis was born in 1986 in Moscow in a family of musicians, and grew up in Greece. At the age of 5 he began his studies in violin and later in viola. As a violinist he graduated summa cum laude from the Conservatory of Patras with a Violin Diploma.

At the age of 14 he started his studies in orchestral conducting under the guidance of his father – a symphony orchestra conductor, and also by participating in International Master Courses for conductors instructed by Prof. Yuri Simonov in Budapest.

In 2011 he graduated summa cum laude from the St Petersburg State Conservatory "Rimsky Korsakov", where he has been studying Symphonic and Operatic conducting since 2006, under Prof. Yuri Simonov.

He has conducted orchestras such as the Symphony Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre , Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, State Academic Symphony Orchestra of St Petersburg, State Academic "Cappella-Glinka" Symphony Orchestra of St Petersburg, Orchestra Camerata of the State Hermitage Museum, Orchestra of the Frankfurt Opera, Croatian Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra, Bialystok Symphony Orchestra, "Liszt-Wagner" Symphony Orchestra Budapest, Orchestra Haydn of Bolzano, State Symphony Orchestra of Athens, State Symphony Orchestra of Thessaloniki, Greek Radio National Symphony Orchestra, Patras Orchestra and others.

In 2010 he made his opera debut in the Opera Theater of St Petersburg State Conservatory where he conducted Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's "Ιolanta".

Dimitris Botinis has participated in International Festivals such as "Musical Olympus" of St Petersburg and International Festival of Patras.

He is currently an assistant conductor of the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra.

Source: operaandballet.com







































More photos


See also


Johann Sebastian Bach: Partita No.2 in C minor, BWV 826 – Ivan Bessonov (HD 1080p)

Sergei Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D minor – Alexandеr Malofeev, Russian National Youth Symphony Orchestra, Dimitris Botinis (HD 1080p)

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Olga Scheps – All the posts

Photo by Priska Ketterer















Olga Scheps (b. 1986, Moscow) began playing her first melodies and pieces aged just five years and learned to play the piano in the same was as she did speaking, walking and reading. In 1992, her family moved from Moscow to Germany, Olga Scheps' new home.

The pianist is fluent in German, Russian and English. At the age of 16, she became a young student at the Cologne Academy of Music, graduating in 2013 with a distinction. Prof. Pavel Gililov and her parents – also both pianists and piano teachers – are still important advisers to this day. Olga Scheps also gained other important musical impulses from Arie Vardi, Dmitri Bashkirov, Andrei Gavrilov and Alfred Brendel. During her studies, she held a scholarship from the German foundation Musikleben.


Olga Scheps gave some of her first concerts as part of the "Jugend Musiziert" (Youngsters Make Music) prize winners' concert. She was then invited to perform at several concert series and festivals, such as the Rheingau Music Festival, and all of these concerts were sensational successes. Soon after, she debuted at the Ruhr Piano Festival, which she also still regularly attends and performs at.


Since 2009, Olga Scheps has been exclusively signed to Sony Classical and has recently recorded her seventh album. This solo album, featuring works by Erik Satie, was released in may 2016 and reached the No.1 in the official charts in Germany. For her album "Chopin", Olga Scheps received the ECHO award, in the category "Young artist of the Year". All the other albums have reached the top ten in the classical charts. Olga Scheps now lives in her adopted home of Cologne, traveling from there to classical music festivals and concert series in many different countries. She performs with worldwide leading orchestras and conductors.


Source: olgascheps.com




















More photos


Olga Scheps – All the posts


Olga Scheps | Melody – Modest Mussorgsky, Sven Helbig, Chilly Gonzales, Frédéric Chopin, Aphex Twin, Edvard Grieg, Johannes Brahms, Ludovico Einaudi, Christoph Willibald Gluck, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Download 88.2kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: The Seasons – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)

Frédéric Chopin: Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor – Olga Scheps, Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio, Agnieszka Duczmal (HD 1080p)


Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No.7 in B flat major – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Frédéric Chopin: Piano Sonata No.3 in B minor – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Olga Scheps | Melody – Modest Mussorgsky, Sven Helbig, Chilly Gonzales, Frédéric Chopin, Aphex Twin, Edvard Grieg, Johannes Brahms, Ludovico Einaudi, Christoph Willibald Gluck, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Download 88.2kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)























Chilly Gonzales wrote the "Olga Gigue" for her, Sven Helbig did a piano arrangement of his "Pocket Symphony  Am Abend" for her. Vivan and Ketan Bhatti wrote "Memories of Mussorsky" also for piano solo for Olga Scheps.

This work, performed by Olga will also be a part of the new programm of the break dance group "Flying Steps".

More works by Frederic Chopin, Aphex Twin, Ludwig van Beethoven, or Mozart / Volodos are on this album, which reflects the musical world as it is, without genre - borders.

Source: olgascheps.com


Photo by Uwe Arens

















Olga Scheps | Melody

1. Modest Mussorgsky, Vivan Bhatti, Ketan Bhatti: Memories of a Promenade II
2. Sven Helbig: Am Abend (version for piano solo)
3. Chilly Gonzales: Olga Gigue
4. Frédéric Chopin: Nocturnes, Op.9 No.2 in E flat major, Andante
5. Aphex Twin: Avril 14th
6. Edvard Grieg: Lyric Pieces, Op.38 No.3 "Melody"
7. Johannes Brahms: Intermezzo in A major, Op.118 No.2
8. Ludovico Einaudi: Una mattina
9. Chilly Gonzales: Armellodie
10. Christoph Willibald Gluck: Orfeo ed Euridice, Wq. 30, Melody (arr. for piano by Giovanni Sgambati)
11. Johann Sebastian Bach: Concerto Italiano in F major, BWV 971, ii. Andante (transcribed for piano)
12. Ludwig van Beethoven: Für Elise, WoO 59
13. Johann Sebastian Bach / Alessandro Marcello: Concerto in D minor, BWV 974, ii. Adagio (after Oboe Concerto in D minor, S.Z799)
14. Frédéric Chopin: Nocturnes, Op.27 No.2 in D flat major
15. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart / Arcadi Volodos: Turkish March (Concert Paraphrase) based on Rondo alla Turka from Piano Sonata in A major, K.331

Olga Scheps, piano

Recorded, mixed and mastered by Phillip Schulz
Executive producer: Sven Schuhmann
Recorded at Marienmünster Konzertsaal "Ackerscheune", January 15-18, 2019

Sony Classical 2019


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Photo by Uwe Arens
Olga Scheps (b. 1986, Moscow) began playing her first melodies and pieces aged just five years and learned to play the piano in the same was as she did speaking, walking and reading. In 1992, her family moved from Moscow to Germany, Olga Scheps' new home.

The pianist is fluent in German, Russian and English. At the age of 16, she became a young student at the Cologne Academy of Music, graduating in 2013 with a distinction. Prof. Pavel Gililov and her parents – also both pianists and piano teachers – are still important advisers to this day. Olga Scheps also gained other important musical impulses from Arie Vardi, Dmitri Bashkirov, Andrei Gavrilov and Alfred Brendel. During her studies, she held a scholarship from the German foundation Musikleben.


Olga Scheps gave some of her first concerts as part of the "Jugend Musiziert" (Youngsters Make Music) prize winners' concert. She was then invited to perform at several concert series and festivals, such as the Rheingau Music Festival, and all of these concerts were sensational successes. Soon after, she debuted at the Ruhr Piano Festival, which she also still regularly attends and performs at.


Since 2009, Olga Scheps has been exclusively signed to Sony Classical and has recently recorded her seventh album. This solo album, featuring works by Erik Satie, was released in may 2016 and reached the No.1 in the official charts in Germany. For her album "Chopin", Olga Scheps received the ECHO award, in the category "Young artist of the Year". All the other albums have reached the top ten in the classical charts. Olga Scheps now lives in her adopted home of Cologne, traveling from there to classical music festivals and concert series in many different countries. She performs with worldwide leading orchestras and conductors.


Source: olgascheps.com



Photo by by Olga Schepsová


















More photos


See also


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: The Seasons – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)

Frédéric Chopin: Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor – Olga Scheps, Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio, Agnieszka Duczmal (HD 1080p)


Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No.7 in B flat major – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Frédéric Chopin: Piano Sonata No.3 in B minor – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Saturday, March 09, 2019

Johann Sebastian Bach: Partita No.2 in C minor, BWV 826 – Ivan Bessonov (HD 1080p)














Τhe young award-winning Russian pianist and composer Ivan Bessonov performs Johann Sebastian Bach's Partita No.2 in C minor, BWV 826. Recorded in Olpe, Germany, on April 20, 2018.



While this partita and the four that followed appeared after 1726, all were written during that year, a year that saw publication of the B flat major piece first. Bach published a new partita each year until 1731, when all six appeared together. Each of these works consists of dances – typically an Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, and Gigue – and other pieces, forming a whole that could just as easily have been called a suite. They generally show Bach's lighter side, though there is a fair share of serious music here, too. All the partitas have seven movements except for this C minor effort, which comprises six. Another unusual aspect is its exclusion of a Gigue at the close, where Bach substituted a Rondeau and Capriccio.

This suite opens with a Sinfonia which, speaking of serious music, achieves a depth of expression to rival much of Bach's more profound keyboard music. It is in three sections, the first ponderous and dramatic, the succeeding two having progressively faster tempos. The theme in the second section has a soothing serenity in its animated nonchalance, while the final part is lively and light in its variant of this theme, and brims with Bach's deft counterpoint and rhythmic subtlety.

The Allemande that follows is somewhat subdued but features an undercurrent of contrapuntal activity with many delicious details that often come refreshingly to the foreground. The remaining four numbers are much shorter and lighter in expressive content. Best among them may be the ensuing Courante, a sunny, graceful piece whose contrapuntal elements seem to blend rather than conjure, imply rather than articulate.

The ensuing Sarabande is slow, almost hymn-like in its solemn yet soothing manner. The lively Rondeau that follows is jumpy and full of playfulness, while the closing Capriccio is meatier, both in its muscular first section and in the inversion of material from the opening that comes in the latter half. It is also quite a challenging finale for the performer.

This partita will have a duration of about 15 minutes, excluding repeats, a longer one than the slighter first, third, and fifth, but shorter than the fourth and sixth partitas.

Source: Robert Cummings  (allmusic.com)



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

♪ Partita No.2 in C minor, BWV 826 (1726)

i. Sinfonia
ii. Allemande
iii. Courante
iv. Sarabande
v. Rondeaux
vi. Capriccio

Ivan Bessonov, piano

Olpe, Germany, April 20, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Ivan Bessonov was born in St Petersburg in 2002. He received his first piano lessons at the age of six. In 2012 Ivan started his professional education and began studying piano at the Central Music School for particularly gifted children of the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Professor Vadim Rudenko.

In 2015 Ivan made his debut as a film music composer for various feature films. That same year he won the Grand Prix at the International Chopin Piano Competition in St Petersburg. In 2016 Ivan Bessonov won the 1st prize as well as the Audience Prize at the Grand Piano Competition in Moscow and was awarded the 1st prize at the International Anton Rubinstein Piano Competition The Piano Miniature in Russian Music in St Petersburg. His interpretation of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No.1 won him 1st prize at the Eurovision Young Musicians 2018 Competition at the Edinburgh International Festival.

Since 2015 Ivan Bessonov has performed in recitals and with orchestras throughout Russia and Europe. Renowned conductors such as Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Fedoseev or Vladimir Spivakov invite him to perform with their orchestras, including the Mariinsky Orchestra, the Tchaikovsky Orchestra and the Russian National Philharmonic Orchestra.

He regularly performs at various music festivals in Russia and abroad, including the Easter Festival under Valery Gergiev in Moscow and St Petersburg, the Verbier Festival and the Festival de Piano de la Roque d'Antheron. In 2017 he gave a recital as part of the well-known concert series Masters of Tomorrow organised by the Werner Richard - Dr. Carl Dörken Foundation.

The famous pianist Denis Matsuev has also repeatedly invited Ivan to his festivals and concerts. He also performs as a jazz pianist and chamber musician in a trio with his younger brothers, the violinists Nikita and Danila, and furthermore works with great passion as a composer.

Ivan Bessonov has recorded his own compositions and works by Frédéric Chopin for his debut album, which will be released on the ARS Produktion label in spring 2019.

Source: mb-concerts.com







































More photos


See also


Johann Sebastian Bach: Partita No.2 in C minor, BWV 826 – Martha Argerich

Thursday, March 07, 2019

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: The Seasons – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)














German-Russian pianist Olga Scheps performs Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's piano cycle "The Seasons", Op.37a. Recorded at Stadthalle Germering, Munich, Germany, on April 29, 2016.



Tchaikovsky wrote relatively little for solo piano: for most of his career, as is well known, he concentrated on orchestral music and stage works. Among his solo keyboard works, which include a major sonata and the extraordinary Dumka, The Seasons occupies a special place. It consists of twelve character pieces, one for each month of the year, and runs about forty minutes in performance.

It wasn't the only time in Tchaikovsky's life when he followed programmatic ideas proposed to him by other people. We know, for instance, that the idea for a symphonic fantasy on the theme of Romeo and Juliet was suggested by Mily Balakirev, and Hamlet, another Shakespeare play that became the basis for a symphonic poem, was recommended by Tchaikovsky's brother Modest. The impulse for a piano cycle depicting the twelve months of the year came from a Russian music publisher named Nikolai Bernard, who commissioned Tchaikovsky in November 1875, and even provided him with movement titles and short epigraphs from classical poets to indicate his exact plans for the work. Tchaikovsky accepted the blueprint without any changes, and Bernard published the pieces by installments in his musical periodical called Le Nouvelliste, before printing the entire work in a single volume in 1876. Neither Bernard nor Tchaikovsky could possibly be aware that, several decades earlier, another composer had already written a set of piano pieces on the twelve months of the year: Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel's magnificent Das Jahr ("The Year", 1841) was not published in its entirety until 1989.

It is apparent from Tchaikovsky's music that it was written with a highly advanced amateur player in mind-someone who would subscribe to a musical magazine that would deliver new pieces for home consumption at their doorstep every month. The pieces are by no means easy, yet the technical difficulties are, for the most part, manageable. Contrasted in tempo, mood and texture, they show the extent to which Tchaikovsky was able to treat even simple forms with a great deal of sophistication, especially with regard to harmony: modulations into distant keys appear in many of the movements.

The activities and situations associated with the individual months include a peaceful idyll by the fireplace in January, a carnival scene for February, and so on. Descriptive details abound, as in the birdsong of the March movement or the hunting horns in September. What is more remarkable is that Tchaikovsky, although he didn't quibble with Bernard over titles or programs, he had no qualms about working against those titles when they didn't correspond to the music he wanted to write. In the "Barcarole" (June), probably one of the most popular pieces in the set, he ignored the 6/8 meter of all original barcarolas (Venetian gondolier songs) and wrote a melancholy lyrical piece in 4/4 time instead. And anyone who expects a religious hymn in "Christmas" (December), will be surprised to discover that the holiday is represented by, of all things, a waltz. Tchaikovsky was very fond of that dance form (in addition to his great ballets, we find examples in the Fifth Symphony and the Serenade for Strings, among others), and he evidently decided that there could be no better way to end the cycle.

Source: Peter Laki (kennedy-center.org)



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)

♪ The Seasons, Op.37a (1876)

i. January: At the Fireside (A major)
ii. February: Carnival (D major)
iii.March: Song of the Lark (G minor)
iv. April: Snowdrop (B flat major)
v. May: Starlit Nights (G major)
vi. June: Barcarolle (G minor)
vii. July: Song of the Reaper (E flat major)
viii. August: Harvest (B minor)
ix. September: The Hunt (G major)
x. October: Autumn Song (D minor)
xi. November: Troika (E major)
xii. December: Christmas (A flat major)

Olga Scheps, piano

Stadthalle Germering, Munich, Germany, April 29, 2016

(HD 1080p)















Olga Scheps (b. 1986, Moscow) began playing her first melodies and pieces aged just five years and learned to play the piano in the same was as she did speaking, walking and reading. In 1992, her family moved from Moscow to Germany, Olga Scheps' new home.

The pianist is fluent in German, Russian and English. At the age of 16, she became a young student at the Cologne Academy of Music, graduating in 2013 with a distinction. Prof. Pavel Gililov and her parents – also both pianists and piano teachers – are still important advisers to this day. Olga Scheps also gained other important musical impulses from Arie Vardi, Dmitri Bashkirov, Andrei Gavrilov and Alfred Brendel. During her studies, she held a scholarship from the German foundation Musikleben.


Olga Scheps gave some of her first concerts as part of the "Jugend Musiziert" (Youngsters Make Music) prize winners' concert. She was then invited to perform at several concert series and festivals, such as the Rheingau Music Festival, and all of these concerts were sensational successes. Soon after, she debuted at the Ruhr Piano Festival, which she also still regularly attends and performs at.


Since 2009, Olga Scheps has been exclusively signed to Sony Classical and has recently recorded her seventh album. This solo album, featuring works by Erik Satie, was released in may 2016 and reached the No.1 in the official charts in Germany. For her album "Chopin", Olga Scheps received the ECHO award, in the category "Young artist of the Year". All the other albums have reached the top ten in the classical charts. Olga Scheps now lives in her adopted home of Cologne, traveling from there to classical music festivals and concert series in many different countries. She performs with worldwide leading orchestras and conductors.


Source: olgascheps.com




















































More photos


See also


Olga Scheps | Melody – Modest Mussorgsky, Sven Helbig, Chilly Gonzales, Frédéric Chopin, Aphex Twin, Edvard Grieg, Johannes Brahms, Ludovico Einaudi, Christoph Willibald Gluck, Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Download 88.2kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Frédéric Chopin: Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor – Olga Scheps, Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio, Agnieszka Duczmal (HD 1080p)


Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No.7 in B flat major – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Frédéric Chopin: Piano Sonata No.3 in B minor – Olga Scheps (HD 1080p)


Sunday, March 03, 2019

Frédéric Chopin: Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor – Olga Scheps, Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio, Agnieszka Duczmal (HD 1080p)














Accompanied the Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio under the baton of the Polish founder, exclusive conductor and art director of the Orchestra, Agnieszka Duczmal, the German-Russian pianist Olga Scheps plays Frédéric Chopin's Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor, Op.11. Recorded at Tonhalle Dusseldorf, on January 22, 2014.



Chopin, the son of a French father and a Polish mother, was born the same year as Schumann (one later than Mendelssohn, one before Liszt). Before consumption killed him in his 40th year, he had developed both an elegantly sensual pianism and a keyboard oeuvre without expressive parallel. His twin gods were Bach and Mozart (as if Haydn, Beethoven, and Schubert never existed); in turn he influenced keyboard composers for nearly a century after – Schumann, Liszt, Brahms, Dvořák, Debussy, Scriabin, Rachmaninov, and Ravel.

Although we cannot ignore developments in piano manufacture, especially by Pleyel of Paris, it was Chopin's artistry that prompted Schumann to write in 1830, "Hats off, gentlemen! A genius!" Parisian critics, who were then Europe's most cosmopolitan, dubbed him "the Ariel of the piano", although in his lifetime he played in public only 50 times, just once a solo recital, and for audiences usually no larger than 100 listeners.

Before his emigration to Paris in 1831 he had composed six works for piano and orchestra (but nothing orchestral after those), including two concertos published in reverse order. The E minor was issued in 1833, the F minor "Second" in 1836 although Chopin composed it in 1829, when he was 19. Both reflect his infatuation with Vincenzo Bellini's operas, especially Norma, whose ornamentation he adapted and personalized, to the extent of basing his theme-and-variations slow movement in Concerto No.1 on embellishments.

In the classical style that Mozart bequeathed to Beethoven, principal themes of the Allegro maestoso are introduced by the orchestra, at uncommon length which adds admirably to the suspense. Once the piano enters, it dominates. Although the opening subject is marked maestoso, subsequent ones are glowingly lyrical and gorgeously ornamented, even before their development in E minor/major. There is a coda but no cadenza per se (although the entire solo part may be likened to a cadenza).

Chopin wrote, during the composition of the Larghetto (E major/C sharp minor) homage to Bellini, "I am using muted strings – I wonder how they will sound?" He described it as having "a romantic, calm, and rather melancholy character... a kind of moonlight reverie on a beautiful spring night".

The main theme of the Rondo: Vivace in E major has been called both a polka and a Krakowiac; beginning in E major, Chopin modulates to A major for the episode. Before a dashing conclusion, he ventures into E flat, then B major in the episode's return.

The concerto is altogether a prize although its orchestration is neither artful nor brilliant; nonetheless this compares favorably with Schumann's or Hummel's in a well-conducted performance, and the piano writing is nonpareil.

Source: Roger Dettmer (allmusic.com)



Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)

♪ Piano Concerto No.1 in E minor, Op.11 (1830)

i. Allegro maestoso
ii. Larghetto
iii. Rondo: Vivace

Olga Scheps, piano

Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio
Conductor: Agnieszka Duczmal

Tonhalle Dusseldorf, January 22, 2014

(HD 1080p)


















Olga Scheps (b. 1986, Moscow) began playing her first melodies and pieces aged just five years and learned to play the piano in the same was as she did speaking, walking and reading. In 1992, her family moved from Moscow to Germany, Olga Scheps' new home.

The pianist is fluent in German, Russian and English. At the age of 16, she became a young student at the Cologne Academy of Music, graduating in 2013 with a distinction. Prof. Pavel Gililov and her parents – also both pianists and piano teachers – are still important advisers to this day. Olga Scheps also gained other important musical impulses from Arie Vardi, Dmitri Bashkirov, Andrei Gavrilov and Alfred Brendel. During her studies, she held a scholarship from the German foundation Musikleben.


Olga Scheps gave some of her first concerts as part of the "Jugend Musiziert" (Youngsters Make Music) prize winners' concert. She was then invited to perform at several concert series and festivals, such as the Rheingau Music Festival, and all of these concerts were sensational successes. Soon after, she debuted at the Ruhr Piano Festival, which she also still regularly attends and performs at.


Since 2009, Olga Scheps has been exclusively signed to Sony Classical and has recently recorded her seventh album. This solo album, featuring works by Erik Satie, was released in may 2016 and reached the No.1 in the official charts in Germany. For her album "Chopin", Olga Scheps received the ECHO award, in the category "Young artist of the Year". All the other albums have reached the top ten in the classical charts. Olga Scheps now lives in her adopted home of Cologne, traveling from there to classical music festivals and concert series in many different countries. She performs with worldwide leading orchestras and conductors.


Source: olgascheps.com