Alice Sara Ott

Alice Sara Ott
Alice Sara Ott (Photo by Ester Haase)

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Alice Sara Ott – All the posts






















The 2018-2019 season marks a significant year for German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott (b. 1988, Munich, Germany), one of the world's most in-demand classical pianists. She releases her latest album, Nightfall, featuring works by Satie, Debussy and Ravel, including Gaspard de la Nuit, one of the greatest challenges of piano literature. The album marks ten years since Alice has been signed as an exclusive recording artist to Deutsche Grammophon. She will tour the recital programme across the world, with European dates including Paris' La Seine Musicale, Stuttgart's Liederhalle, Vienna's Mozart Saal, Munich's Prinzregententheater, Baden Baden's Festspielhaus, London's Wigmore Hall and the Klavier-Festival Ruhr in Duisburg. These European dates are in addition to a nine-date recital tour across Japan, including Tokyo Opera City, in autumn 2018.

With her talent not limited to a global career as a high level performing artist, Alice Sara Ott also expresses her diverse creativity through a number of design and brand partnerships beyond the borders of classical music. She was personally requested to design a signature line of high-end leather bags for JOST, one of Germany's premium brands. Alice has also been global brand ambassador for Technics, the hi-fi audio brand of Panasonic Corporation, and she has an ongoing collaboration with the French luxury jewellery house, Chaumet.


A prominent figure on the international classical music scene, Alice Sara Ott regularly performs with the world's leading conductors and orchestras. In 2018-2019 as well as the international Nightfall recital tour, Alice will perform with NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo (Gianandrea Noseda), Philharmonia Orchestra (Santtu-Matias Rouvali), BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic (Edward Gardner), London Symphony Orchestra (Elim Chan), St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra (Yuri Temirkanov), and for a European tour with Gothenburg Symphony (Santtu-Matias Rouvali). She continues her collaboration with London Symphony Orchestra via her chamber music residency at LSO St Luke's, where she will give several Alice and Friends concerts with fellow artists including Ray Chen, Pablo Ferrández, Nemanja Radulovic, Alexey Stadler, Dimitri Ashkenazy and Francesco Tristano.


Alice Sara Ott has worked with conductors at the highest level including Lorin Maazel, Gustavo Dudamel, Pablo Heras-Casado, Paavo Järvi, Neeme Järvi, Sir Antonio Pappano, Gianandrea Noseda, Andres Orozco-Estrada, Yuri Temirkanov, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sakari Oramo, Osmo Vänskä, Vasily Petrenko, Myung-Whun Chung, Hannu Lintu and Robin Ticciati. She continues to perform with ensembles such as Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Wiener Symphoniker and Dresdner Philharmonie.


Source: alicesaraott.com





Photos by Ester Haase

More photos


Alice Sara Ott – All the posts


Alice Sara Ott | Nightfall – Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Maurice Ravel (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor – Alice Sara Ott, L'Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Mikko Franck (HD 1080p)

Alice Sara Ott plays Claude Debussy (Suite bergamasque, Rêverie), Frédéric Chopin (Nocturnes Nos. 1, 2, 13, Ballade No.1 in G minor), Erik Satie (Gnossiennes Nos. 1 & 3, Gymnopédie No.1), & Maurice Ravel (Gaspard de la nuit) (HD 1080p)

Maurice Ravel: Piano Concerto in G major – Alice Sara Ott, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Santtu-Matias Rouvali (HD 1080p)

Franz Liszt: Piano Concerto No.2 in A major – Alice Sara Ott, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Santtu-Matias Rouvali (HD 1080p)

Monday, May 20, 2019

Alice Sara Ott | Nightfall – Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Maurice Ravel (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)























Alice Sara Ott presents Nightfall, where she explores the transition and harmony between day and night, light and darkness. This recording showcases a collection of deeply emotional piano pieces by Satie, Debussy and Ravel.

On her new album Nightfall, set for release by the Yellow Label on 24 August 2018, Alice Sara Ott takes a very personal look at the magical moment in time and space between day and night, light and darkness, basing her explorations on works by Debussy, Satie and Ravel. The German-Japanese pianist decided to mark the dual celebration of her 30th birthday and her 10th anniversary as a Deutsche Grammophon artist by examining her relationship with three French composers who have had a significant influence on her, and whose music made an indelible impression on the Parisian arts scene at the turn of the 20th century. With meticulous attention to detail, she traces the shifting moods in these works, revealing the fascinating interplay of the light and dark tones used by Debussy, Satie and Ravel to create such wide-ranging atmospheres.

Ending and beginning, transparency and opacity. As day turns to night and light fades into darkness, we enter the blue hour of twilight, when the air seems full of mystery, fleetingly saturated in blue and purple hues before inexorably darkening to blackness. It is precisely this elusive change in atmosphere that Alice Sara Ott sets out to capture in musical terms on Nightfall. The album is a particularly personal artistic project for Alice Sara Ott, documenting the intensity of her musical encounters with these three composers.

Debussy, Satie and Ravel were contemporaries, and all three lived, worked and died in Paris. They were friends, but also rivals, each writing in his own very individual style. As a result, we hear the contrast between the dreaminess of Debussy's Rêverie (1890), written when the young composer was still in search of his own stylistic ideas; the dark, romantic and intricate storytelling of Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit (1908); and the minimalistic snapshots of Satie's Gymnopédies and Gnossiennes (1888-1890). Debussy's dance-based Suite bergamasque was published in 1905, and Ott sees its most famous movement, "Clair de lune" – inspired by the Verlaine poem of the same name – as reflecting the way people don masks of happiness to disguise their pain. As for Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte of 1899, she suggests it may be about the quest for eternal youth.

This album gives us a glimpse of the artist's thought process, which goes beyond consideration of the musico-historical significance of the works in question, beyond her artistic interpretation of the scores and her desire for technical perfection. On a higher, more abstract level, her readings of the shimmering ambiguities central to these works mirror the dichotomy of all human emotions, as well as shining a light on her personal fascination with the psychological fissures and contradictions that mark each and every one of us, and which are just as hard to capture as the changing moods of the complex, filigree music of Debussy, Satie and Ravel.

Source: alicesaraott.com
























Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

♪ Rêverie (1890)

♪ Suite bergamasque (1890, rev. 1905)

i. Prélude. Moderato (tempo rubato)

ii. Menuet. Andantino
iii. Clair de lune. Andante très expressif
iv. Passepied. Allegretto ma non troppo


Erik Satie (1866-1925)

♪ Gnossienne No.1 (1889-1890)
♪ Gymnopédie No.1 (1888)
♪ Gnossienne No.3 (1889-1890)


Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

♪ Gaspard de la nuit, M.55 (1908)

i. Ondine
ii. Le Gibet
iii. Scarbo

♪ Pavane pour une infante défunte, M.19 (1899/1910)


Alice Sara Ott, piano

Recording: Berlin, Meistersaal, March 2018

Deutsche Grammophon 2018


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Nightfall. It's that magical hour when day and night face each other and the sky descends into twilight. For a brief moment, light and darkness are in harmony and merge together.

I believe that we humans all carry certain elements of light and darkness within us. An awareness and affirmation of life, reality and conscience on the one hand, the shadow of greed and temptation on the other. The demand for things we can't have. And we don't always succeed in recognising or even defining the boundary between them.

This album is devoted to the music of three composers who lived, worked and died in Paris. Three contemporaries, sometimes friends, sometimes rivals. Though they could hardly have been more different, they were all part of an era and a movement that stood the world of art on its head and gave it a new definition and significance.

Claude Debussy composed Rêverie in 1890 while still in a phase of musical searching and development. Rêverie, with its repeated motifs and its lack of climaxes, has a somnolent, trance-like character that connects it with the world of Satie. It's also a marvellous, almost innocent way to begin this album.

Suite bergamasque arose in the same year. But Debussy reworked it over and over again before releasing it for publication in 1905. Inspired by baroque dance rhythms, the outer movements Prélude and Passepied, as well as Menuet, have a merry, sometimes festive character that poses a great contrast to Clair de lune.

Here Debussy set a like-named poem by Paul Verlaine in which the poet speaks of the happiness that masks his sorrow. This human dichotomy finds vivid expression in Debussy's setting.

Erik Satie's Gymnopédies (1888) and Gnossiennes (1890) are among the most popular works in the history of classical music. Satie was convinced that a composer has no right to claim his listeners' time. He developed his own notion of background music, which he called musique d'ameublement – "furniture music". Despite his minimalist style of composition, Satie was an extremely complex and cynical man. This is plain to see in his instructions to the player: instead of expression marks we find such turns of phrase as "Open your head", "Bury the sound" or "Create something hollow". The ambiguity of these phrases not only makes me rack my brain (they remind me of the lyrics of my favourite band, Pink Floyd), but sometimes cause me to doubt Satie's humble artistic persona.

Maurice Ravel, with his three-part Gaspard de la nuit of 1908, composed one of the greatest challenges in the piano repertoire. Goaded by the ambition to surpass Mily Balakirev's Islamey, then regarded as the most difficult piano piece ever written, he set three poems from Gaspard de la nuit, a volume of prose-poems by Aloysius Bertrand. By his own account, Bertrand received this volume from the Devil himself, who, disguised as an old man, met him in a park in Dijon. Ravel's setting is demanding in the extreme, both pianistically and emotionally. In Ondine, named for the water sprite who falls unhappily in love with a human being, we are confronted with our own fears of rejection and heartbreak. In Le Gibet, where the dead man's heartbeat echoes through the entire piece, we face the fear of loss and transience. And Scarbo, a gnome who attacks artists in the night and drinks their blood, confronts us with fear of failure. While Ravel was working on this piece his father suffered a stroke, and the act of creation was overshadowed by the ever-present dread of receiving news of his death. One month after completing his pianistic triptych, Ravel's father died of cerebral thrombosis.

At the end of the album is Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte, a little piece composed in 1899. I found it a fitting way to end this very complex and bleak album. Ravel himself described the piece as "an evocation of a pavane that a little princess might, in former times, have danced at the Spanish court". Whether this expresses a desire for eternal youth, or the dilemma of someone who cannot grow up, is a question I leave to the listener's imagination.

To me, this album is one of the most personal and challenging recordings I have ever made. This year marks the beginning of a new decade in my life, and my tenth year with Deutsche Grammophon. I wanted to assemble a programme that reflects my personal memories and experiences of the last ten years.

One month before I entered the recording studio – I was in the midst of the bleak world of Gaspard de la nuit – my father suffered a heart attack that he barely survived. Despite the fortunate outcome, these were terrifying hours and days in which I realised how close life and death are intertwined. But there can be no light without darkness, and no hope without fear. And sometimes the borders blur. As in Nightfall.

I dedicate this album to my family and all those who have accompanied and supported me in the 30 years of my life's brief journey.

Source: Alice Sara Ott (Translation: J. Bradford Robinson) (CD Booklet)























The merger of light and darkness purports to govern the programme choices for Alice Sara Ott's latest release, although her interpretations fall more into the shades of grey category. A dark and rather somnolent aura prevails in Debussy's Rêverie, in comparison to the 94-year-young Menahem Pressler's shapelier traversal released a few months ago on the same label (5/2018). By contrast, Ott's straightforward, line-orientated Suite bergamasque differs from the muted hues and subjectivity characterising label-mate Seong-Jin Cho's recent version (1/2018). Compare her relatively grounded "Menuet" movement to Cho's lighter, more capricious reading and you'll hear for yourself.

On the other hand, she underplays and tiptoes around "Clair de lune", unlike Jean-Yves Thibaudet's beautifully sung-out rendition (Decca, 7/2000). Her "Passepied" sounds relatively matter-of-fact and neutral when measured alongside Cho (again) and a faster, more interestingly inflected Alexis Weissenberg performance that's also on DG (7/1986). Ott's slow and rhetorical Satie Gnossienne No.1 sounds unctuous and self-aware next to Alexandre Tharaud's faster, more direct and comfortably idiomatic recording (Harmonia Mundi), although she treats the popular first Gymnopédie and the third Gnossienne simply and beautifully.

On to Ravel's increasingly ubiquitous Gaspard de la nuit. For all of Ott's attractive shadings and half tints in "Ondine", other pianists bring more consistent clarity to the main chordal ostinato pattern (Aimard, Berezovsky and, of course, Michelangeli). She stretches "Le gibet" out to a possibly record-breaking 9'20", as opposed to the normal five-to seven-minute range of motion. Amazingly enough, however, Ott's carefully calibrated nuances and balances and hypnotic sense of long line prove gripping on their own terms. The repeated notes in the introduction to "Scarbo" sound less foreboding and mysterious than mechanically hammered out, while the dotted rhythms are accurately executed yet lack the lightness, spring and propulsion one hears in the classic reference recordings of Pogorelich (DG, 6/1983) and François (EMI/Warner). An elegant, intimately scaled Ravel Pavane closes a recital that largely goes in one ear and out the other, save for Ott's extraordinary, not-to-be-missed slow-motion "Le gibet".

Source: Jed Distler (gramophone.co.uk)


The 2018-2019 season marks a significant year for German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott (b. 1988, Munich, Germany), one of the world's most in-demand classical pianists. She releases her latest album, Nightfall, featuring works by Satie, Debussy and Ravel, including Gaspard de la Nuit, one of the greatest challenges of piano literature. The album marks ten years since Alice has been signed as an exclusive recording artist to Deutsche Grammophon. She will tour the recital programme across the world, with European dates including Paris' La Seine Musicale, Stuttgart's Liederhalle, Vienna's Mozart Saal, Munich's Prinzregententheater, Baden Baden's Festspielhaus, London's Wigmore Hall and the Klavier-Festival Ruhr in Duisburg. These European dates are in addition to a nine-date recital tour across Japan, including Tokyo Opera City, in autumn 2018.

With her talent not limited to a global career as a high level performing artist, Alice Sara Ott also expresses her diverse creativity through a number of design and brand partnerships beyond the borders of classical music. She was personally requested to design a signature line of high-end leather bags for JOST, one of Germany's premium brands. Alice has also been global brand ambassador for Technics, the hi-fi audio brand of Panasonic Corporation, and she has an ongoing collaboration with the French luxury jewellery house, Chaumet.


A prominent figure on the international classical music scene, Alice Sara Ott regularly performs with the world's leading conductors and orchestras. In 2018-2019 as well as the international Nightfall recital tour, Alice will perform with NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo (Gianandrea Noseda), Philharmonia Orchestra (Santtu-Matias Rouvali), BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic (Edward Gardner), London Symphony Orchestra (Elim Chan), St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra (Yuri Temirkanov), and for a European tour with Gothenburg Symphony (Santtu-Matias Rouvali). She continues her collaboration with London Symphony Orchestra via her chamber music residency at LSO St Luke's, where she will give several Alice and Friends concerts with fellow artists including Ray Chen, Pablo Ferrández, Nemanja Radulovic, Alexey Stadler, Dimitri Ashkenazy and Francesco Tristano.


Alice Sara Ott has worked with conductors at the highest level including Lorin Maazel, Gustavo Dudamel, Pablo Heras-Casado, Paavo Järvi, Neeme Järvi, Sir Antonio Pappano, Gianandrea Noseda, Andres Orozco-Estrada, Yuri Temirkanov, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sakari Oramo, Osmo Vänskä, Vasily Petrenko, Myung-Whun Chung, Hannu Lintu and Robin Ticciati. She continues to perform with ensembles such as Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Wiener Symphoniker and Dresdner Philharmonie.


Source: alicesaraott.com















Photos by Ester Haase

More photos


See also


Alice Sara Ott – All the posts

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor – Alice Sara Ott, L'Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Mikko Franck (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France under the baton of the Finnish conductor and violinist Mikko Franck, the German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott, one of the most requested artists at the classical music scene, performs Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor, Op.37. Recorded at Auditorium de Radio France, on January 27, 2018.



Beethoven composed his Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor in 1799-1800, and introduced it at Vienna on April 5, 1803. The first sketches go back to 1797  after he'd composed the B flat Piano Concerto (published as No.2), but before composition of the C major Concerto (in 1798, published as No.1). Although Beethoven played the first performance of No.3 in 1803 from a short score – no one was going to steal it from him! – he'd actually completed the music prior to April 1800, apart from a few last-minute adjustments. In other words, before he wrote the Second Symphony (Op.36), the Moonlight Piano Sonata (Op.27/2), or the Op.31 triptych for keyboard.

The model for this startlingly dramatic concerto was Mozart's C minor (K.491), which Beethoven played in public concerts. But "model" does not mean he merely imitated; indeed, the orchestra's traditional first exposition is so extensively developed that the soloist's repetition risks sounding anticlimactic. Otherwise, as Charles Rosen has written with formidable insight in The Classical Style, "There are many passages in the first movement, Allegro con brio, which allude to Mozart's concerto in the same key... particularly the role of the piano after the cadenza. But the striking development section, with [a] new melody half-recitative [and] half-aria, is entirely original, as is the new sense of weight to the form". Beethoven wrote down that cadenza several years later, to preserve the work's character and momentum, when implacable deafness seriously disadvantaged his public appearances at the keyboard.

To his contemporaries the slow movement came – and can still come – as a shock. Not only did he mark it Largo (which is to say very slowly), in 3/8 time, but chose the remote key of E major (four sharps, vs. C minor's three flats). Alone, the piano leads off for 11 measures, introducing both the main theme and ornamentation that accompanies it throughout. Here Beethoven anticipated the solo opening of his G major Fourth Concerto five years down the road, although in that work he dispensed with thematic decorations, beautiful as they were (and are) in the Largo of No.3.

Characteristically, the finale is a rondo Allegro, again in tonic C minor, with a pair of principal themes introduced by the soloist. This movement is rich in humor yet also dramatic, with a passage midway in E major to remind us where we've been. Following another (but brief) cadenza, Beethoven switches to C major, accelerates the tempo to Presto, and gives the orchestra the last word.

Source: Roger Dettmer (allmusic.com)



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor, Op.37 (1800)


i. Allegro con brio [
2:12]*

ii. Largo [19:32]
iii. Rondo. Allegro [29:19]


Encore:

Ludwig van Beethoven


♪ Bagatelle No.25 in A minor, WoO 59, "Für Elise" (1810) [42:49]



Alice Sara Ott, piano

L'Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France
Conductor: Mikko Franck

Auditorium de Radio France, January 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)

* Start time of each movement















The 2018-2019 season marks a significant year for German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott (b. 1988, Munich, Germany), one of the world's most in-demand classical pianists. She releases her latest album, Nightfall, featuring works by Satie, Debussy and Ravel, including Gaspard de la Nuit, one of the greatest challenges of piano literature. The album marks ten years since Alice has been signed as an exclusive recording artist to Deutsche Grammophon. She will tour the recital programme across the world, with European dates including Paris' La Seine Musicale, Stuttgart's Liederhalle, Vienna's Mozart Saal, Munich's Prinzregententheater, Baden Baden's Festspielhaus, London's Wigmore Hall and the Klavier-Festival Ruhr in Duisburg. These European dates are in addition to a nine-date recital tour across Japan, including Tokyo Opera City, in autumn 2018.

With her talent not limited to a global career as a high level performing artist, Alice Sara Ott also expresses her diverse creativity through a number of design and brand partnerships beyond the borders of classical music. She was personally requested to design a signature line of high-end leather bags for JOST, one of Germany's premium brands. Alice has also been global brand ambassador for Technics, the hi-fi audio brand of Panasonic Corporation, and she has an ongoing collaboration with the French luxury jewellery house, Chaumet.


A prominent figure on the international classical music scene, Alice Sara Ott regularly performs with the world's leading conductors and orchestras. In 2018-2019 as well as the international Nightfall recital tour, Alice will perform with NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo (Gianandrea Noseda), Philharmonia Orchestra (Santtu-Matias Rouvali), BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic (Edward Gardner), London Symphony Orchestra (Elim Chan), St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra (Yuri Temirkanov), and for a European tour with Gothenburg Symphony (Santtu-Matias Rouvali). She continues her collaboration with London Symphony Orchestra via her chamber music residency at LSO St Luke's, where she will give several Alice and Friends concerts with fellow artists including Ray Chen, Pablo Ferrández, Nemanja Radulovic, Alexey Stadler, Dimitri Ashkenazy and Francesco Tristano.


Alice Sara Ott has worked with conductors at the highest level including Lorin Maazel, Gustavo Dudamel, Pablo Heras-Casado, Paavo Järvi, Neeme Järvi, Sir Antonio Pappano, Gianandrea Noseda, Andres Orozco-Estrada, Yuri Temirkanov, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sakari Oramo, Osmo Vänskä, Vasily Petrenko, Myung-Whun Chung, Hannu Lintu and Robin Ticciati. She continues to perform with ensembles such as Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Wiener Symphoniker and Dresdner Philharmonie.


Source: alicesaraott.com




















































More photos


See also


Alice Sara Ott – All the posts

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Alice Sara Ott plays Claude Debussy (Suite bergamasque, Rêverie), Frédéric Chopin (Nocturnes Nos. 1, 2, 13, Ballade No.1 in G minor), Erik Satie (Gnossiennes Nos. 1 & 3, Gymnopédie No.1), & Maurice Ravel (Gaspard de la nuit) (HD 1080p)












German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott, one of the most requested artists at the classical music scene, performs Claude Debussy (Suite bergamasque, Rêverie), Frédéric Chopin (Nocturnes Nos. 1, 2, 13, Ballade No.1 in G minor), Erik Satie (Gnossiennes Nos. 1 & 3, Gymnopédie No.1), and Maurice Ravel (Gaspard de la nuit). Recorded at Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, on September 27, 2018.



Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

♪ Suite bergamasque (1890, rev. 1905)

i. Prélude. Moderato (tempo rubato)

ii. Menuet. Andantino
iii. Clair de lune. Andante très expressif
iv. Passepied. Allegretto ma non troppo


Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)


♪ Nocturnes


i. No.1 in B flat minorOp.9 No.1 (1830-1832)

ii. No.2 in E flat major, Op.9 No.2 (1830-1832)
iii. No.13 in C minor,  Op.48 No.1 (1841)

♪ Ballade No.1 in G minor, Op.23 (1831-1835)


Claude Debussy

♪ Rêverie (1890)


Erik Satie (1866-1925)

♪ Gnossienne No.1 (1889-1890)
♪ Gymnopédie No.1 (1888)
♪ Gnossienne No.3 (1889-1890)


Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

♪ Gaspard de la nuit, M.55 (1908)

i. Ondine
ii. Le Gibet
iii. Scarbo


Alice Sara Ott, piano

Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, September 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)


The 2018-2019 season marks a significant year for German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott (b. 1988, Munich, Germany), one of the world's most in-demand classical pianists. She releases her latest album, Nightfall, featuring works by Satie, Debussy and Ravel, including Gaspard de la Nuit, one of the greatest challenges of piano literature. The album marks ten years since Alice has been signed as an exclusive recording artist to Deutsche Grammophon. She will tour the recital programme across the world, with European dates including Paris' La Seine Musicale, Stuttgart's Liederhalle, Vienna's Mozart Saal, Munich's Prinzregententheater, Baden Baden's Festspielhaus, London's Wigmore Hall and the Klavier-Festival Ruhr in Duisburg. These European dates are in addition to a nine-date recital tour across Japan, including Tokyo Opera City, in autumn 2018.

With her talent not limited to a global career as a high level performing artist, Alice Sara Ott also expresses her diverse creativity through a number of design and brand partnerships beyond the borders of classical music. She was personally requested to design a signature line of high-end leather bags for JOST, one of Germany's premium brands. Alice has also been global brand ambassador for Technics, the hi-fi audio brand of Panasonic Corporation, and she has an ongoing collaboration with the French luxury jewellery house, Chaumet.


A prominent figure on the international classical music scene, Alice Sara Ott regularly performs with the world's leading conductors and orchestras. In 2018-2019 as well as the international Nightfall recital tour, Alice will perform with NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo (Gianandrea Noseda), Philharmonia Orchestra (Santtu-Matias Rouvali), BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic (Edward Gardner), London Symphony Orchestra (Elim Chan), St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra (Yuri Temirkanov), and for a European tour with Gothenburg Symphony (Santtu-Matias Rouvali). She continues her collaboration with London Symphony Orchestra via her chamber music residency at LSO St Luke's, where she will give several Alice and Friends concerts with fellow artists including Ray Chen, Pablo Ferrández, Nemanja Radulovic, Alexey Stadler, Dimitri Ashkenazy and Francesco Tristano.


Alice Sara Ott has worked with conductors at the highest level including Lorin Maazel, Gustavo Dudamel, Pablo Heras-Casado, Paavo Järvi, Neeme Järvi, Sir Antonio Pappano, Gianandrea Noseda, Andres Orozco-Estrada, Yuri Temirkanov, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sakari Oramo, Osmo Vänskä, Vasily Petrenko, Myung-Whun Chung, Hannu Lintu and Robin Ticciati. She continues to perform with ensembles such as Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Wiener Symphoniker and Dresdner Philharmonie.


Source: alicesaraott.com























































More photos


See also


Alice Sara Ott – All the posts

Thursday, May 09, 2019

Next wave of star musicians announced as BBC Radio 3 reveals New Generation Artists 2019-2021

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

BBC Radio 3 has announced the seven musicians from around the world who have been selected to join its prestigious New Generation Artists scheme from 2019-2021.

The musicians joining the scheme are: pianists Eric Lu and Alexander Gadjiev, violist Timothy Ridout, mezzo-soprano Ema Nikolovska, violinist Johan Dalene, the Consone Quartet, and jazz guitarist Rob Luft.

Now in its 20th year, BBC Radio 3's New Generation Artists scheme was founded in 1999 with the aim of nurturing and promoting some of the world's best young musicians at the start of their international careers. Over the past 20 years the scheme has featured a series of major names from the world of classical music today, including violinist Janine Jansen, mezzo-soprano Alice Coote and percussionist Colin Currie.

New Generation Artists are given the opportunity to broadcast from some of the UK's most prestigious venues and festivals, make studio recordings, and collaborate with other NGAs in chamber music. Every New Generation Artist performs in Radio 3's flagship Lunchtime Concert series from Wigmore Hall and there are also opportunities to work with the BBC Orchestras, and for new music commissions.

Through supporting the brightest musicians in reaching the next stage of their careers, the NGA scheme showcases new talent to listeners across the UK through a series of BBC Radio 3 broadcasts. Over the past 20 years the scheme has supported well over 100 internationally recognised artists as diverse as pianists Igor Levit and Beatrice Rana, Andrei Ionita (cello), Lawrence Power (viola), Mark Simpson (clarinet), the Pavel Haas and Belcea Quartets, Sean Shibe (guitar), singers including Elizabeth Watts (soprano) and Ashley Riches (bass-baritone), jazz trumpeter Laura Jurd, and Gwilym Simcock (jazz piano).

Emma Bloxham, Editor, BBC Radio 3, says: "BBC Radio 3's New Generation Artists scheme offers an unrivalled platform to some of the world's most exceptional young musicians at the start of their international careers. As ever it's been a great privilege to hear the wealth of young talent out there, and I've absolutely no doubt these seven young musicians will do us proud as we celebrate 20 years of music-making at the very highest level".

Alan Davey, Controller, BBC Radio 3, says: "I'm proud of our New Generation Artists scheme and the opportunities it gives young musicians to develop and thrive. In its 20th year we have an amazing group of young artists who will change the world for the better by making great music. From a string quartet using period instruments to a prominent UK jazz guitarist, we are proud to reflect all different types of music in this year's selection. I know each will grow singly and also together, as further opportunities to record and perform allows them to fulfil their potential and build on their already considerable achievements. Welcome to the Class of 2019!"

This year's New Generation Artists will join those who began the scheme in 2018, and listeners will be able to hear from both talent pools throughout the year. The 2018-2020 New Generation Artists who will remain on the scheme for another year are: tenor Alessandro Fisher, cellist Anastasia Kobekina, the Aris Quartet, pianist Elisabeth Brauss, baritone James Newby and soprano Katharina Konradi.

The 2019-2021 New Generation Artists are:


Eric Lu, piano (USA)

Eric Lu (b. 1997, Massachusetts) first came to international attention as a prize winner at the 2015 Chopin International Competition in Warsaw aged just 17. Most recently he was awarded First Prize at the Leeds International Piano Competition in September 2018.

Eric has performed with the Minnesota Orchestra, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century and Qatar Philharmonic, at Carnegie Hall, Alte Oper Frankfurt, Taipei National Concert Hall, Tokyo Metropolitan Hall, Auditorio Nacional Madrid and Seoul Arts Centre.

He makes his BBC Proms debut this September with the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra and Long Yu.


Alexander Gadjiev, piano (Slovenia / Italy)

Born in 1994 in the Italian town of Gorizia, very close to the Slovenian border, Alexander Gadjiev studied with his father and at the Salzburg Mozarteum with Pavel Gililov.

The winner of the 2015 Hamamatsu International Piano Competition (where he also took the Audience Prize) and the 2018 Monte Carlo World Piano Masters Competition, Alexander has performed extensively in Japan, and at many of Europe's major festivals including Verbier, La Folle Journee in France, Ravenna Musica, and Kammermusik Salzburg.


Timothy Ridout, viola (UK)

Born in 1995 in London, Timothy studied at the Royal Academy of Music, graduating with the Queen's Commendation for Excellence. He was selected by Young Classical Artists Trust in 2016 and currently studies at the Kronberg Academy with Nobuko Imai.

He was awarded First Prize in the Lionel Tertis International Viola Competition in 2016, and won the prestigious Thierry Scherz Award at the Sommets Musicaux de Gstaad in 2019.

Sought after as both a chamber musician and soloist, Timothy's collaborators have included Benjamin Grosvenor, Frank Dupree, Frans Helmerson, Christian Tetzlaff, Isabelle Faust, Pavel Kolesnikov and Kian Soltani among many others.

Upcoming engagements include a residency with the Baden-Baden Philharmonie, and appearances with the Hamburg Symphony Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchester Zurich, Orchestre de Lille, Camerata Salzburg, Philharmonia Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra of Europe.














Consone Quartet (UK)

Agata Daraskaite, violin | Magdalena Loth-Hill, violin | Elitsa Bogdanova, viola | George Ross, cello

Formed at the Royal College of Music in London, the Consone Quartet is dedicated to exploring Classical and Early Romantic repertoire on period instruments. The winner of the 2016 Royal Overseas League Ensemble Prize, the Consone Quartet was also awarded two prizes at the 2015 York Early Music International Young Artists Competition, including a place on the "EEEmerging" – Emerging European Ensembles Scheme – associated with the Ambronay Festival in France and six other early music festivals across Europe.

Recent highlights include an acclaimed debut at London's Wigmore Hall as well as performances at Cadogan Hall, the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace, and at the Cheltenham Festival. The Consone Quartet is rapidly gaining international recognition, performing extensively in Europe. They also toured South America last year.


Johan Dalene, violin (Sweden)

Aged just 18, violinist Johan Dalene (Norrköping, 2000) is already making an impact on the international music scene, performing with leading orchestras and in important recital halls both at home in Sweden and abroad. He was also recently awarded First Prize at the prestigious 2019 Carl Nielsen Competition.

In 2018, Johan was accepted on to the Norwegian Crescendo programme, as part of which he has worked closely with mentors Janine Jansen, Leif Ove Andsnes and Gidon Kremer. Johan will also appear on stage with Janine Jansen and other members of the programme at the Wigmore Hall in November 2019.

Upcoming engagements include performances with all the major Scandinavian orchestras as well as debuts with both the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and the New Japan Philharmonic. Johan has also been invited to be an Artist in Residence with the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra from 2020-2021.


Rob Luft, jazz guitar (UK)

Twenty five year-old jazz guitarist Rob Luft (b. 1993, Sidcup, London) has already been nominated for a string of awards, including 2018 Breakthrough Act and Instrumentalist of the Year in 2019 at the Jazz FM Awards and Instrumentalist of the Year in the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards.

Concert highlights for Rob have included performances with artists including Django Bates, Iain Ballamy, Loose Tubes, and Laura Jurd's band Dinosaur. As well as leading his own quintet, Rob collaboratively runs several other projects, including a duo with the Albanian jazz/folk singer Elina Duni, a mainstream jazz quartet with Dave O'Higgins playing the music of Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane, and the nuevo tango quintet Deco Ensemble.

Rob is also a regular member of a multitude of some of London's finest modern jazz groups, such as Byron Wallen's Four Corners, Eddie Parker's Airborn, and the Chris Batchelor / Steve Buckley quintet.


Ema Nikoslovska, mezzo-soprano (North Macedonia / Canada)

Ema is the recipient of many prizes, including the Guildhall Wigmore Prize, the 2018 Susan Longfield Prize, and First Prize as well as the Audience Prize at the 25th Maureen Lehane Vocal Awards. She is currently studying on the Opera Course at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama with Professor Rudolf Piernay.

Notable performances include recitals and masterclasses at the Toronto Summer Music Academy and Festival, Thomas Hampson's Heidelberger Frühling Lied Akademie, a recital with Malcolm Martineau in Berlin's Pierre Boulez Saal, and a performance of Ligeti's Síppal, dobbal, nádihegedüvel for mezzo and percussion ensemble at Milton Court Concert Hall for the BBC Symphony Orchestra's Ligeti Total Immersion Day, broadcast on BBC Radio 3.

Ema's upcoming engagements include her debut recital at Wigmore Hall with pianist Dylan Perez later this month, Verbier Festival Academy's Atelier Lyrique, Kaija Saariaho's Creative Dialogue XI symposium Concert in Finland in August, a recital of French art song with pianist Joseph Middleton for Northern Ireland Opera's Festival of Voice in Glenarm (broadcast on Radio 3), and a recital with pianist Gary Beecher at the Oxford Lieder Festival.

















New Generation Artists is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 which offers listeners access to the very best young international talent. The scheme was launched in 1999.

Every autumn, six or seven artists or groups who are beginning to make a mark on the international music scene are invited to join the NGA scheme. They are given the opportunity broadcast from some of the UK's most prestigious venues and festivals, as well as make appearances and recordings with the BBC orchestras and studio recordings for BBC Radio 3.

New Generation Artists have featured in some of Britain's most prominent festivals, including BBC Proms, the EFG London Jazz Festival, Aldeburgh Festival, Cheltenham Festival and Edinburgh International Festival.

In partnership with the Royal Philharmonic Society, Radio 3 has commissioned a number of works for New Generation Artists, from composers including Simon Holt, Geoffrey Burgon, Augusta Read Thomas, Karin Rehnqvist, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Alexander Goehr.

Source: bbc.co.uk

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Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Richard Wagner: Wesendonck Lieder – Lise Davidsen, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Edward Gardner (HD 1080p)














Norwegian soprano Lise Davidsen sings the touching love songs Wagner wrote for his one-time beloved Mathilde Wesendonck. Performed with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of the English conductor Edward Gardner. Recorded at Grieg Hall (Grieghallen), Bergen, Norway, in January 2018.

"Lise Davidsen is the real deal" — Financial Times

Richard Wagner (1813-1883)

♪ Wesendonck Lieder, WWV 91 (1857-1858)

Librettist: Mathilde Wesendonck (1828-1902)

i. Der Engel / The Angel (G major), composed November 1857
ii. Stehe still! / Be still! (C minor), composed February 1858
iii. Im Treibhaus – Studie zu Tristan und Isolde / In the Greenhouse (D minor), composed May 1858
iv. Schmerzen / Sorrows (E flat major), composed December 1857
v. Träume – Studie zu Tristan und Isolde / Dreams (A flat major), composed December 1857

Lise Davidsen, soprano

Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Edward Gardner

Grieg Hall (Grieghallen), Bergen, Norway, January 2018

(HD 1080p)















Lyric dramatic soprano Lise Davidsen (b. 1987) has attracted serious attention since she was crowned winner of both the Operalia and the Queen Sonja competitions in 2015. Growing up in Stokke, a rural town in south-eastern Norway, Lise has been an artist to watch since she began her musical training.

Lise began studying guitar and singing at age fifteen. At first she favoured the guitar but, with more training, singing took prominence. Lise's early teachers included Mona Skatteboe and Runa Skramstad, who gave her an excellent foundation in classical music.

Lise achieved her bachelor's degree in classical singing in 2010 from the Grieg Academy of Music in Bergen, Norway. During this time she worked with many notable singers including Bettina Smith and Hilde Haraldsen Sveen and joined the Norwegian Soloists Choir as a mezzo soprano, under artistic director Grete Pedersen.

While studying for a master's degree at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, Lise's teacher, Susanna Eken, urged her to develop her voice for the world of opera as a soprano. Lise's first major engagement as a soprano was in 2011 at the Young Talent Concert in Bergen, singing arias by Strauss and Wagner with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Rory Macdonald.

Lise made her Royal Danish Opera debut in the 2012-2013 season as the Dog and Owl in The Cunning Little Vixen. She has since returned to sing Emilia Otello and Rosalinde Die Fledermaus, and was awarded the Reumert Talentpris. In the same season, she was a part of the Mozart residency at Aix-en-Provence, where she was instantly reinvited for the following year to work with Waltraud Meier for the residency A Tribute to Patrice Chèreau.

In 2014, Lise graduated from the Opera Academy in Copenhagen and had the honour of receiving the Léonie Sonning talent prize and Danis Singers Award 2014. She also received financial support from the Skipsreder Tom Wilhelmsen, Karen and Arthur Feldthusens and Sine Butenschøns Foundations.

2015 was a standout year for Lise; her breakthrough performances won her the first prize, Birgit Nilsson Award and Audience Prize at the Operalia competition in London, in addition to the first prize, the prize for the best performance of Norwegian music and the Ingrid Bjoner Scholarship at the Queen Sonja International Music Competition. She was also a triple winner at the 2015 Hans Gabor Belvedere Singing Competition in Amsterdam and received the HSBC Aix-en-Provence Laureate and Statoil Talent Bursary Award in the same year.

The 2018-2019 season sees Lise make her Bayreuth debut as Elisabeth in a new production of Tannhäuser conducted by Valery Gergiev. The role is also a vehicle for returns to Opernhaus Zürich and Bayerische Staatsoper. Other highlights include her debut as Liza Queen of Spades at Oper Stuttgart and a company debut with Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in their Ring Cycle. On the concert platform she makes a highly anticipated return to the BBC Proms with Verdi's Requiem together with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and Andrés Orozco Estrada as well appearing at the Edinburgh International Festival with the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra, Vasily Petrenko and a programme of Strauss songs. Further performances throughout the season include Vier letzte Lieder with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra, the Stavanger Orchestra and the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra; an open air concert with Oslo Philharmonic; her debut as Sieglinde Die Walküre with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and Sir Andrew Davis and with the Antwerp Symphony Orchestra and Edo de Waart; Wesendonck Lieder and Rückert-Lieder with the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra; and solo recitals with James Baillieu at Opernhaus Zürich and Schubertiada Vilabertran.

Source: lisedavidsen.com






























































More photos


See also


Edward Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor – Truls Mørk, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Edward Gardner (HD 1080p)

Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No.5 in D minor – BBC Symphony Orchestra, Edward Gardner

Sergei Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead – hr-Sinfonieorchester, Edward Gardner (HD 1080p)

Sergei Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini – hr-Sinfonieorchester, Kirill Gerstein, Edward Gardner (HD 1080p)