1985

1985 (2018) – A film by Yen Tan – Cory Michael Smith, Virginia Madsen, Michael Chiklis, Jamie Chung

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Sergei Redkin – All the posts















Sergei Redkin was born in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, on October 27, 1991. He began to play the piano at the age of five. At the age of six he began to study at the Music Lyceum of Krasnoyarsk, in the class of Galina Boguslavskaya. At the same time he began to study improvisation and composition with Eduard Markaich.

In year 2004, after becoming a laureat of the International Gavrilin competition of young composers in Saint Petersburg, Sergei continued his education at the Special Music School of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, in the class of Olga Kurnavina. At that time Sergei won his first several prizes at competitions for young pianists, such as Rachmaninov competition (Saint Petersburg, 2005, First prize) and Chopin competition (Estonia, 2006, Grand prix). Sergei also played his first solo recitals in Russia and abroad, getting engagements from Germany, Switzerland, Poland.

Simultaneously Sergei studied composition under prof. Alexander Mnatsakanyan, one of the last students of great Shostakovich. Among the young composer's works you can find a string quartet, a trio for winds, chamber music, a lot of music for piano. Suite for cello and piano won the First prize at the young composers' competition in Saint Petersburg in 2007.

In 2008 Sergei was honored to receive the Maestro Temirkanov Award as one of the best students of Saint Petersburg Special Music School.

In year 2009 Sergei successfully passed his entrance exams and became a student of prof. Alexander Sandler at the Saint Petersburg state Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory. He also continued his composition studies under prof. Mnatsakanyan.

During the year 2011 with the support of St Petersburg House of Music Sergei Redkin trained at the famous International Lake Como Piano Academy in Italy, studying under such musicians as William Grant Nabore, Dmitry Bashkirov, Peter Frankl, Fou Ts'ong among others.

In year 2012 Sergei became the winner of III International Maj Lind competition in Helsinki, in 2013 – the winner of VI International Prokofiev competition in Saint Petersburg. In 2015 Sergei Redkin won the Third prize and the Bronze medal at the XV International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow.

Currently Sergei is continuing his studies under prof. Sandler in Saint Petersburg Conservatory. In 2016 he's playing his first concerts in New York, Mexico and Paris (all with Maestro Valery Gergiev and Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra), touring with solo recitals throughout the world, from Portugal and Israel to Vladivostok and Yakutsk, taking part at prestigious classical music festivals, playing a lot of chamber music and composing in the meantime.

Source: sergeiredkin.com

















Sergei Redkin – All the posts

Sergei Redkin plays Sergei Redkin: Blumenstyk, & Sergei Rachmaninov: Études-tableaux, Op.39 (HD 1080p)

Sergei Redkin plays Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.30 in E major, & Frédéric Chopin: Ballade No.4 in F minor (HD 1080p)

Sergei Redkin plays Sergei Rachmaninov, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart & Franz Schubert (HD 1080p)


Sergei Redkin plays Maurice Ravel: Sonatine for piano in F sharp minor, & Sergei Prokofiev: 3 Pieces from Cinderella & Piano Sonata No.2 in D minor


Sergei Redkin plays Johann Sebastian Bach / Ferruccio Busoni: Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, & Franz Schubert: Piano Sonata No.20 in A major, D.959


Frédéric Chopin: Piano Sonata No.3 in B minor – Sergei Redkin (HD 1080p)


Sergei Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor – Sergei Redkin, St Petersburg State Capella Symphony Orchestra, Sergei Roldugin (HD 1080p)


Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor – Sergei Redkin, St Petersburg State Capella Symphony Orchestra, Alim Shakhmametyev (HD 1080p)


Frédéric Chopin: Piano Concerto No.2 in F minor – Sergei Redkin, St Petersburg State Capella Symphony Orchestra, Aleksandr Chernushenko (HD 1080p)


Sergei Redkin plays Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 in B flat minor, & Sergei Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.2 in G minor – State Academic Symphony Orchestra "Evgeny Svetlanov", Alexey Bogorad – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Final Round


Sergei Redkin plays Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.12 in A major – Moscow Soloists Chamber Orchestra, Ayrton Desimpelaere – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, Second stage


Sergei Redkin plays Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Schubert / Franz Liszt & Sergei Prokofiev – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, First stage


Sergei Redkin plays Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 1



See also

Dmitry Masleev – All the posts

George Li – All the posts

Lukas Geniušas – All the posts

Daniel Kharitonov – All the posts

Haik Kazazyan – All the posts

Yu-Chien Tseng – All the posts

Lucas Debargue – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Sergei Redkin plays Sergei Redkin: Blumenstyk, & Sergei Rachmaninov: Études-tableaux, Op.39 (HD 1080p)














Russian pianist Sergei Redkin (third prize at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015) performs his own work titled "Blumenstyk", and Sergei Rachmaninov's Études-tableaux, Op.39. Recorded at St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, on December 14, 2016.


Sergei Rachmaninov: Études-tableaux, Op.39

These Études are somewhat longer and more challenging than those of Op.33, even though the poetic aspect of the "Tableaux" is still present. They are without exception extraordinarily difficult.

Flying triplet figurations span the keyboard in the propulsive and driven Étude No.1 in C minor. There are two powerful climaxes, each preceded by rapidly repeated chords.

In the Étude No.2 in A minor, Rachmaninov indulges his love of the "Dies Irae" chant, embedding it in the accompaniment of this tragic and powerful piece. A contrasting central section builds to a climax that dissipates in chromatic passages before the reprise of the opening.

The Étude No.3 in F sharp minor has interesting and unusual metrical groupings of its underlying triplet rhythms. Combined with the fleeting nature of the figuration, this makes it particularly difficult to develop a sense of a regular beat. The result is effective, if somewhat unsettling. A cadenza ends the piece quietly.

A march-like work with shifting meters, the Étude No.4 in B minor had no time signatures, but most editors have inserted them for the performer's convenience. This Étude is primarily a study in repeated notes and staccato chords.

The Étude No.5 in E flat minor is a somber and grand work, almost too epic in mood for its scale. A powerful theme is played against triplet chords in the main section, while the contrasting middle section features a longing melody accompanied by widespread arpeggios. The build-up to the return of the main theme is highly effective and results in an extraordinarily powerful climax.

The large scale and extreme difficulty of the Étude No.6 in A minor seem more appropriate to this ambitious set than to Op.33, where it originally was placed. This exciting and aggressive piece features alternating sections of rapid staccato chords and tricky sixteenth-note figurations.

An elegiac work, the Étude No.7 in C minor starts out with slow sustained passages followed by a driving, march-like section. The repeated chords of this passage build to a sonorous climax before subsiding for the quiet ending.

The beautiful Étude No.8 in D minor has an underlying rhythm that makes it sound much like a Barcarolle. The harmonies are lush and romantic, supporting the sparse melodic material, which is constructed primarily of a repeated motive. There is something of a build-up to a subtle and understated climax before the interesting and staccato reprise of the main material.

Much like the final Prélude of Op.32, the Étude No.9 in D major uses material from the other pieces of the set. It is primarily a study of chords, ostensibly dramatic but not highly effective and somewhat anticlimactic when the set is performed as a whole.

Source: Steven Coburn (allmusic.com)



Sergei Redkin (b. 1991)

♪ Blumenstyk


Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)

♪ Études-tableaux, Op.39 (1916-1917)

i. Allegro agitato in C minor
ii. Lento assai in A minor
iii. Allegro molto in F sharp minor
iv. Allegro assai in B minor
v. Appassionato in E flat minor
vi. Allegro in A minor
vii. Lento lugubre in C minor
viii. Allegro moderato in D minor
ix. Allegro moderato, Tempo di Marcia in D major


Sergei Redkin, piano

St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, December 14, 2016

(HD 1080p)















Sergei Redkin was born in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, on October 27, 1991. He began to play the piano at the age of five. At the age of six he began to study at the Music Lyceum of Krasnoyarsk, in the class of Galina Boguslavskaya. At the same time he began to study improvisation and composition with Eduard Markaich.

In year 2004, after becoming a laureat of the International Gavrilin competition of young composers in Saint Petersburg, Sergei continued his education at the Special Music School of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, in the class of Olga Kurnavina. At that time Sergei won his first several prizes at competitions for young pianists, such as Rachmaninov competition (Saint Petersburg, 2005, First prize) and Chopin competition (Estonia, 2006, Grand prix). Sergei also played his first solo recitals in Russia and abroad, getting engagements from Germany, Switzerland, Poland.

Simultaneously Sergei studied composition under prof. Alexander Mnatsakanyan, one of the last students of great Shostakovich. Among the young composer's works you can find a string quartet, a trio for winds, chamber music, a lot of music for piano. Suite for cello and piano won the First prize at the young composers' competition in Saint Petersburg in 2007.

In 2008 Sergei was honored to receive the Maestro Temirkanov Award as one of the best students of Saint Petersburg Special Music School.

In year 2009 Sergei successfully passed his entrance exams and became a student of prof. Alexander Sandler at the Saint Petersburg state Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory. He also continued his composition studies under prof. Mnatsakanyan.

During the year 2011 with the support of St Petersburg House of Music Sergei Redkin trained at the famous International Lake Como Piano Academy in Italy, studying under such musicians as William Grant Nabore, Dmitry Bashkirov, Peter Frankl, Fou Ts'ong among others.

In year 2012 Sergei became the winner of III International Maj Lind competition in Helsinki, in 2013 – the winner of VI International Prokofiev competition in Saint Petersburg. In 2015 Sergei Redkin won the Third prize and the Bronze medal at the XV International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow.

Currently Sergei is continuing his studies under prof. Sandler in Saint Petersburg Conservatory. In 2016 he's playing his first concerts in New York, Mexico and Paris (all with Maestro Valery Gergiev and Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra), touring with solo recitals throughout the world, from Portugal and Israel to Vladivostok and Yakutsk, taking part at prestigious classical music festivals, playing a lot of chamber music and composing in the meantime.

Source: sergeiredkin.com



















































More photos


See also


Sergei Redkin – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015


Sunday, August 27, 2017

Sergei Redkin plays Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.30 in E major, & Frédéric Chopin: Ballade No.4 in F minor (HD 1080p)














Russian pianist Sergei Redkin (third prize at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015) performs Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Sonata No.30 in E major, Op.109, and Frédéric Chopin's Ballade No.4 in F minor, Op.52. Recorded at St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, on December 14, 2016.


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.30 in E major, Op.109

By the time Beethoven composed this work, his output had declined substantially, perhaps owing to his deafness and disappointments in life. The only complete works to emerge from the period of 1820-1823 were the last three piano sonatas, the Missa Solemnis and the Ninth Symphony. Even when compared to these imposing works, the E major Piano Sonata retains its status of a masterpiece. It is a remarkable work in several respects.

The first movement has a nearly unique structure: it opens with theme marked Vivace ma non troppo that almost immediately slows to an Adagio espressivo. Thereafter, the two contrasting tempos and utterances alternate. Scarlatti and Mozart had used such a scheme before, but never in such a bold and innovative fashion. On the surface, this short movement has a serene, almost angelic quality, but, like many other works written during this period, the composition's surface is merely one dimension among many. Indeed, nothing about this sonata is one-dimensional. Thus, for example, the subdued, brightly lit realm suggested by the beginning of the works eventually leads the listener to sections where the narrative slows down, conjuring up dark shadows that intimate feelings of longing and doubt.

The second movement, given its sonata form structure would be typical of a Beethoven first movement if it were not for its terse development and extreme brevity. There are two subject groups in this Prestissimo, with the first led by an assertive theme that more than vaguely suggests Schumann's piano style. More subdued at the outset, the second subject generates tension and energy as it progresses. Following a brief development, an interesting reprise leads to a concise coda.

The finale is twice as long as the previous two movements put together. It is a theme-and-variations scheme, whose main theme is marked Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo. The melody is beautiful, in style looking toward the Romantic movement that was then in its infancy. It is tranquil yet melancholy, pleased but valedictory. Some of the six variations generate further variations either through development (the third variation), or as a result of a two-tiered layout (the second variation). While the finale contains many lively moments, it is predominantly slow-to-moderate in tempo and generally subdued, gaining in confidence as the narrative proceeds. This movement concludes with the main theme played slowly and serenely. While the ending suggests a certain peaceful resolution of life's struggles and conflicts, it also reveals a feeling of resignation which is free of conflict and fear.

Source: Robert Cummings (allmusic.com)


Frédéric Chopin: Ballade No.4 in F minor, Op.52

Together with the Barcarolle, the Polonaise-Fantaisie, and the second and third sonatas, the Fourth Ballade represents the summit of Chopin's art. The tentative start is haunting and suggestive and was once beautifully described by the critic Joan Chissell as bringing the same sense of wonder that a blind person, if granted the gift of sight, might feel on discovering the world's beauty for the first time. The principal, highly Slavonic theme is closely related to the first of Chopin's Trois Nouvelles Études (1839), the second of the opus 25 Études and surely provided an inspiration for Liszt's La Leggierezza (1848; all four works are in the key of F minor). It returns twice bejewelled, and the second subject's appearance in B flat and the return of the opening in A flat never disrupt the music's self-generating momentum. An aerial cadenza and a canonic treatment of the first subject bear eloquent witness to Chopin's increasing veneration for Bach, and the build-up and the pianissimo chords announcing a coda of the most fiery intricacy are as remarkable as anything in Chopin. They remind us simultaneously of his capacity for large-scale heroics and for the most intimate and hauntingly distinctive confidences.

Source: Bryce Morrison, 2004 (hyperion-records.co.uk)



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Piano Sonata No.30 in E major, Op.109 (1820)

i. Vivace ma non troppo. Adagio espressivo
ii. Prestissimo
iii. Gesangvoll, mit innigster Empfindung. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo


Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)

♪ Ballade No.4 in F minor, Op.52 (1842, revised 1843)


Sergei Redkin, piano

St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, December 14, 2016

(HD 1080p)















Sergei Redkin was born in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, on October 27, 1991. He began to play the piano at the age of five. At the age of six he began to study at the Music Lyceum of Krasnoyarsk, in the class of Galina Boguslavskaya. At the same time he began to study improvisation and composition with Eduard Markaich.

In year 2004, after becoming a laureat of the International Gavrilin competition of young composers in Saint Petersburg, Sergei continued his education at the Special Music School of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, in the class of Olga Kurnavina. At that time Sergei won his first several prizes at competitions for young pianists, such as Rachmaninov competition (Saint Petersburg, 2005, First prize) and Chopin competition (Estonia, 2006, Grand prix). Sergei also played his first solo recitals in Russia and abroad, getting engagements from Germany, Switzerland, Poland.

Simultaneously Sergei studied composition under prof. Alexander Mnatsakanyan, one of the last students of great Shostakovich. Among the young composer's works you can find a string quartet, a trio for winds, chamber music, a lot of music for piano. Suite for cello and piano won the First prize at the young composers' competition in Saint Petersburg in 2007.

In 2008 Sergei was honored to receive the Maestro Temirkanov Award as one of the best students of Saint Petersburg Special Music School.

In year 2009 Sergei successfully passed his entrance exams and became a student of prof. Alexander Sandler at the Saint Petersburg state Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory. He also continued his composition studies under prof. Mnatsakanyan.

During the year 2011 with the support of St Petersburg House of Music Sergei Redkin trained at the famous International Lake Como Piano Academy in Italy, studying under such musicians as William Grant Nabore, Dmitry Bashkirov, Peter Frankl, Fou Ts'ong among others.

In year 2012 Sergei became the winner of III International Maj Lind competition in Helsinki, in 2013 – the winner of VI International Prokofiev competition in Saint Petersburg. In 2015 Sergei Redkin won the Third prize and the Bronze medal at the XV International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow.

Currently Sergei is continuing his studies under prof. Sandler in Saint Petersburg Conservatory. In 2016 he's playing his first concerts in New York, Mexico and Paris (all with Maestro Valery Gergiev and Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra), touring with solo recitals throughout the world, from Portugal and Israel to Vladivostok and Yakutsk, taking part at prestigious classical music festivals, playing a lot of chamber music and composing in the meantime.

Source: sergeiredkin.com







































More photos


See also


Sergei Redkin – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015

Friday, August 25, 2017

Sergei Redkin plays Sergei Rachmaninov, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart & Franz Schubert (HD 1080p)














Russian pianist Sergei Redkin (third prize at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015) performs Sergei Rachmaninov's Études-tableaux, Op.33 No.7 in G minor, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Ave verum corpus, K.618 (piano transcription by Franz Liszt), and Franz Schubert's Soirées de Vienne, valse caprice for piano No.6, D.969 & D.779, and Der Müller und der Bach / The Miller and the Brook, from Die Schöne Mullerin, Op.25, D.795 (piano transcription by Franz Liszt). Recorded at St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, on June 22, 2016.



Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)

♪ Études-tableaux, Op.33 No.7 in G minor (1911)


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) / Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

♪ Ave verum corpus, K.618 / S.461 (June 17, 1791 / 1862)


Franz Schubert (1797-1828) / Franz Liszt

♪ Soirées de Vienne, valse caprice for piano No.6, D.969 & D.779 / S.427 (1827, 1825 / 1852)

♪ Der Müller und der Bach (The Miller and the Brook), from Die Schöne Mullerin, Op.25, D.795 / S.565 (1823 / 1846)


Sergei Redkin, piano

St Petersburg Music House, English Hall, June 22, 2016

(HD 1080p)















Sergei Redkin was born in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, on October 27, 1991. He began to play the piano at the age of five. At the age of six he began to study at the Music Lyceum of Krasnoyarsk, in the class of Galina Boguslavskaya. At the same time he began to study improvisation and composition with Eduard Markaich.

In year 2004, after becoming a laureat of the International Gavrilin competition of young composers in Saint Petersburg, Sergei continued his education at the Special Music School of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, in the class of Olga Kurnavina. At that time Sergei won his first several prizes at competitions for young pianists, such as Rachmaninov competition (Saint Petersburg, 2005, First prize) and Chopin competition (Estonia, 2006, Grand prix). Sergei also played his first solo recitals in Russia and abroad, getting engagements from Germany, Switzerland, Poland.

Simultaneously Sergei studied composition under prof. Alexander Mnatsakanyan, one of the last students of great Shostakovich. Among the young composer's works you can find a string quartet, a trio for winds, chamber music, a lot of music for piano. Suite for cello and piano won the First prize at the young composers' competition in Saint Petersburg in 2007.

In 2008 Sergei was honored to receive the Maestro Temirkanov Award as one of the best students of Saint Petersburg Special Music School.

In year 2009 Sergei successfully passed his entrance exams and became a student of prof. Alexander Sandler at the Saint Petersburg state Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory. He also continued his composition studies under prof. Mnatsakanyan.

During the year 2011 with the support of St Petersburg House of Music Sergei Redkin trained at the famous International Lake Como Piano Academy in Italy, studying under such musicians as William Grant Nabore, Dmitry Bashkirov, Peter Frankl, Fou Ts'ong among others.

In year 2012 Sergei became the winner of III International Maj Lind competition in Helsinki, in 2013 – the winner of VI International Prokofiev competition in Saint Petersburg. In 2015 Sergei Redkin won the Third prize and the Bronze medal at the XV International Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow.

Currently Sergei is continuing his studies under prof. Sandler in Saint Petersburg Conservatory. In 2016 he's playing his first concerts in New York, Mexico and Paris (all with Maestro Valery Gergiev and Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra), touring with solo recitals throughout the world, from Portugal and Israel to Vladivostok and Yakutsk, taking part at prestigious classical music festivals, playing a lot of chamber music and composing in the meantime.

Source: sergeiredkin.com



























More photos


See also


Sergei Redkin – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Antonio Vivaldi: The Four Seasons – Janine Jansen, Amsterdam Sinfonietta (HD 1080p)














Janine Jansen, the world-famous violinist from Soest, a town in the central Netherlands, and Amsterdam Sinfonietta perform the Antonio Vivaldi's Four Seasons, Op.8. Recorded at TivoliVredenburg during the Internationaal Kamermuziek Festival Utrecht, on June 29, 2014.



The Four Seasons (Le quattro stagioni) is a group of four violin concerti by Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi, each of which gives a musical expression to a season of the year. Were composed in 1723 and were published in 1725 in Amsterdam, together with eight additional violin concerti, as Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione (The contest between harmony and invention).

The Four Seasons is the best known of Vivaldi's works. Unusual for the time, Vivaldi published the concerti with accompanying poems (possibly written by Vivaldi himself) that elucidated what it was about those seasons that his music was intended to evoke. It provides one of the earliest and most-detailed examples of what was later called program music – music with a narrative element.

Vivaldi took great pains to relate his music to the texts of the poems, translating the poetic lines themselves directly into the music on the page. In the middle section of the Spring concerto, where the goatherd sleeps, his barking dog can be marked in the viola section. Other natural occurrences are similarly evoked. Vivaldi separated each concerto into three movements, fast-slow-fast, and likewise each linked sonnet into three sections.

Source: en.wikipedia.org



Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

Le Quattro Stagioni / The Four Seasons (1723)

Concerto No.1 in E major, Op.8, RV 269, "La primavera" (Spring)

i. Allegro [0:04]*
ii. Largo e pianissimo sempre [3:31]
iii. Allegro pastorale [6:02]


Concerto No.2 in G minor, Op.8, RV 315, "L'estate" (Summer)

i.Allegro non molto [10:22]
ii. Adagio e piano – Presto e forte [15:41]
iii. Presto [17:54]


Concerto No.3 in F major, Op.8, RV 293, "L'autunno" (Autumn)

i. Allegro [21:01]
ii. Adagio molto [26:10]
iii. Allegro [28:41]


Concerto No.4 in F minor, Op.8, RV 297, "L'inverno" (Winter)

i. Allegro non molto [32:05]
ii. Largo [35:21]
iii. Allegro [37:00]


Janine Jansen, violin

Amsterdam Sinfonietta

TivoliVredenburg, Internationaal Kamermuziek Festival Utrecht, June 29, 2014

(HD 1080p)

* Start time of each track
















With an enviable international reputation, violinist Janine Jansen (b. 1978) works regularly with the world's most eminent orchestras and conductors. This season she is Perspectives Artist at Carnegie Hall New York performing a variety of concerto and chamber music programmes throughout the season, while tours are planned with Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Daniele Gatti), London Symphony Orchestra (with Michael Tilson Thomas as well as Semyon Bychkov) and Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie (Paavo Järvi).

Other highlights this season include engagements with the Berlin Philharmonic (Paavo Järvi), Munich Philharmonic (Zubin Mehta), Staatskapelle Dresden (Antonio Pappano), Philadelphia Orchestra and Rotterdam Philharmonic (Yannick Nézet-Seguin), Czech Philharmonic (Jakob Hrusa), Oslo Philharmonic and Vienna Symphony (David Afkham), Royal Stockholm Philharmonic (Karina Canellakis) and Iceland Symphony (Daniel Blendulf). She will also travel to the Far East and Australia performing with Singapore, Sydney and New Zealand Symphony Orchestras.

A devoted chamber musician, Janine joins Mischa Maisky, Martha Argerich, Itamar Golan and Lily Maisky for a major European Chamber Music Tour. She performs a number of recitals throughout Europe with pianists Alexander Gavrylyuk, Elisabeth Leonskaja and Kathryn Stott.  As part of her Perspectives Series at Carnegie Hall she will perform Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time" with Lucas Debargue, Torleif Thedéen and Martin Fröst. In this context she will also perform the US premiere of Michel van der Aa's violin concerto with Philadelphia Orchestra and Nézet-Seguin. Further concerts at Carnegie Hall include a chamber programme with Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the Dover Quartet.

Janine records exclusively for Decca Classics and since recording Vivaldi's Four Seasons back in 2003 she has been extremely successful in the digital music charts. Her latest release, conducted by Antonio Pappano, features Bartok's Violin Concerto No.1 with London Symphony Orchestra and Brahms' Violin Concerto with the Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. Other highlights of her discography include a recording of Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No.2 with London Philharmonic Orchestra and Vladimir Jurowski, Beethoven and Britten with Paavo Järvi, Mendelssohn and Bruch with Riccardo Chailly, Tchaikovsky with Daniel Harding as well as an album of Bach Concertos with her own ensemble. Janine has also released a number of chamber music discs, including Schubert's String Quintet and Schoenberg's Verklärte Nacht and Sonatas by Debussy, Ravel and Prokofiev with pianist Itamar Golan.

Janine has won numerous prizes, including four Edison Klassiek Awards, four ECHO Klassik awards, the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, NDR Musikpreis for outstanding artistic achievement and the Concertgebouw Prize. She has been given the VSCD Klassieke Muziekprijs for individual achievement and the Royal Philharmonic Society Instrumentalist Award for performances in the UK. In September 2015 she was awarded the Bremen MusikFest Award. Janine studied with Coosje Wijzenbeek, Philipp Hirshhorn and Boris Belkin.

In 2003 Janine founded the hugely successful International Chamber Music Festival in Utrecht. After 13 years Janine stepped down from her position as Artistic Director in June 2016 and named cellist Harriet Krijgh as her successor.

Janine Jansen plays the 1707 Stradivarius "Rivaz - Baron Gutmann" violin kindly on loan from Dextra Musica.

Source: janinejansen.com















Amsterdam Sinfonietta has occupied a unique position as the only professional string orchestra in the Netherlands for the past 25 years. It enjoys an international reputation and has given concerts throughout the world. The ensemble comprises 22 string players who perform under the leadership of its concertmaster and artistic leader Candida Thompson.

Amsterdam Sinfonietta was founded in 1988, with Lev Markiz as its first artistic director. Candida Thompson has been concertmaster of the ensemble since 1995, as well as its artistic director since 2003. This approach to music-making without a conductor is what distinguishes the group from "regular" chamber orchestras. It calls for an extremely intense degree of involvement from all the musicians. In past years Amsterdam Sinfonietta has toured Europe, China, the United States and Australia. It has appeared at major venues including the Barbican Hall in London, Cité de la Musique in Paris, the National Centre of Performing Arts in Beijing and the Berlin Konzerthaus.

The repertoire encompasses a variety of styles, ranging from Baroque to contemporary works. Alongside performances of mainstream repertoire, the orchestra frequently champions unjustly neglected or new works. Amsterdam Sinfonietta has recently premièred compositions by composers such as Sofia Gubaidulina, Florian Maier, Michel van der Aa, Pēteris Vasks, Thomas Larcher and Sally Beamish. The ensemble has gained a reputation for creating highly innovative programmes; its trademark versatility recently earned it the prestigious classical music prize De Ovatie (The Ovation) in 2013. It frequently presents original and compelling combinations of works, initiates surprising collaborations and embraces groundbreaking concepts involving video art, dance or theatre. Successful partnerships were forged with the choreographers Emio Greco and PC, the actor Jeroen Willems, choreographer Nanine Linning, stage director Pierre Audi and singer-songwriter Patrick Watson.

Amsterdam Sinfonietta has worked with a host of internationally renowned musicians, such as Sergei Khachatryan, Barbara Hannigan, Sol Gabetta, David Fray, Janine Jansen, Dejan Lazić, Steven Isselis, Jean-Guihen Queyras, Isabelle Faust, Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Jasper de Waal, Martin Fröst, Alexander Melnikov, Christianne Stotijn, Bobby McFerrin and Wende.

In past seasons Amsterdam Sinfonietta has undertaken tours with Sol Gabetta, Patricia Kopatchinskaja and Martin Fröst. In January 2014 the Orchestra joined forces with the American baritone Thomas Hampson, performing a unique song programme in twelve concert halls across Europe. Upcoming projects in season 2017-2018 include a tour through Europe and South America.

Amsterdam Sinfonietta's educational KleuterSinfonietta children's performances are enjoyed by thousands of young children in the Netherlands each year. It also organises the Sinfonietta Strijkersdagen (Sinfonietta String Players Days), giving young musicians the opportunity to participate in workshops and perform in public in specially formed string orchestras.

Within the past decade Amsterdam Sinfonietta has produced an impressive array of CDs under Candida Thompson's leadership, in collaboration with the high-quality Channel Classics label. These include "The Mahler Album" (2011), "Britten" (2013) "Shostakovich & Weinberg" (2013) and "The Argentinian Album" (2014). The latest CD "Schubert String Quintet" was released in October 2015. Recently the Orchestra has also recorded CDs for labels such as ECM, Sony Classical and Deutsche Grammophon.

Source: sinfonietta.nl



















































More photos


See also


Olivier Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps – Martin Fröst, Lucas Debargue, Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Trio No.1 in C minor – Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen, Eldar Nebolsin

Antonio Vivaldi: The Four Seasons – Julia Fischer, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, Kenneth Sillito (Two Versions, HD 1080p)

Vivaldi Unmasked (Vivaldi and the Four Seasons) – Clio Gould, Charles Hazlewood – BBC, 2002

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Maurice Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit – Lucas Debargue (HD 1080p)














Rising French pianist Lucas Debargue performs Maurice Ravel's three-part suite Gaspard de la nuit. Recorded at Tippet Rise Arts Center's Olivier Barn, Fishtail, Montana, United States, on August 21, 2016.



Though competent at the piano, Ravel was no virtuoso; so, when he set out to compose a work for the instrument that would be, in his own words, "more difficult than [Balakirev's] Islamey", he drew heavily on the brilliant pianistic style of Franz Liszt to fulfill his ambition. The resulting three-part suite, Gaspard de la nuit, forever changed the technical landscape of keyboard music. Perhaps pianist Alfred Cortot put it best when he called the work "one of the most extraordinary examples of instrumental ingenuity which the industry of composers has ever produced".

Gaspard de la nuit, subtitled "Three Poems after Aloysius Bertrand", takes as its inspiration Bertrand's same-titled 1842 collection of medieval tales, which the author claimed were whispered to him in the night by the devil, Gaspard. Each of the pieces in Ravel's suite is prefaced by one of the poems; no doubt the same macabre streak that led Ravel to spend many nights absorbed in the stories of Edgar Allen Poe is also responsible for the composer's powerful attraction to Bertrand's rather dark work. Gaspard was premiered in January 1909 by pianist Ricardo Viñes, who had introduced Ravel to Bertrand's work.

Each of the three pieces of the suite, "Ondine", "Le Gibet", and "Scarbo", presents not only an individual assortment of pianistic demands but also a unique musical language and narrative vision. In the first piece Ravel undertakes the portrayal of the water nymph Ondine's seduction of a mortal man. Shimmering C sharp major figuration soon becomes the background for a transparent melodic strand marked très doux et très expressif (very soft and expressive). The fluid background pauses only once during "Ondine" – for a brief pianissimo Très lent that precedes the final, quicksilver cadenza.

"Le Gibet" (The Gibbet) is a musical horror story of such textural density that Ravel notated nearly all of the piece on three staves. An extract from the preface of the corresponding poem provides some idea of the musical atmosphere: "It is the bell sounding from the walls of a city far away below the horizon, and the carcass of a dead man hanging from a gibbet, reddened by the setting sun". Ravel's "bells" are the slightly irregularly grouped B flats that sound continuously throughout the piece, around which the composer weaves music of total psychological suspense. The dynamic never exceeds piano, and Ravel demands that the performer play "without expression" for the last portion of the piece.

"Scarbo" is 19 pages of some of the most frightful digital difficulties ever devised. Scarbo himself is a somewhat malicious night-dwarf who comes, laughing, to horrify, and then disappears without a trace. Here Ravel places the greatest emphasis on his singular sense of rhythm; witness the perfectly placed pauses throughout. Rapid repeated notes, wild arpeggiations, and sudden shifts of texture and dynamics are among the hurdles pianists must overcome; a famous passage in parallel seconds seems to owe its existence to the composer's own peculiarly double-jointed thumb, and is therefore quite challenging for those without such a physical anomaly. After a tremendous triple-fortissimo climax, the music dissolves into impish pianissimo thirty-second notes.

Source: Blair Johnston (allmusic.com)



Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

♪ Gaspard de la nuit, M.55 (1908)

i. Ondine
ii. Le Gibet
iii. Scarbo

Lucas Debargue, piano

Tippet Rise Arts Center's Olivier Barn, Fishtail, Montana, United States, August 21, 2016

(HD 1080)















There hasn't been a foreign pianist who has caused such a stir since Glenn Gould's arrival in Moscow in the midst of the Cold War, or Van Cliburn's victory at the Tchaikovsky Competition. — Olivier Bellamy, Le Huffington Post

Though placed "only" fourth at the 15th International Tchaikovsky Competition in 2015 Lucas Debargue was the only musician across all disciplines who was awarded the coveted Moscow Music Critic's Prize as a pianist "whose incredible gift, artistic vision and creative freedom have impressed the critics as well as the audience".

Straight after this incredible breakthrough Lucas Debargue is invited to play solo and with leading orchestras in the most prestigious concert halls in Russia, France, Italy, the UK, Germany, the USA, Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, South Korea and with such famous conductors as Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Fedoseev, Vladimir Jurowsky, Andrey Boreyko, Gidon Kremer, Vladimir Spivakov or Vasily Petrenko.

Lucas Debargue has already released two CDs with the label Sony Classical, the first with works by Scarlatti, Chopin, Liszt and Ravel (March 2016), the second with works by Bach, Beethoven and Medtner (September 2016).

Born in 1990, Lucas Debargue was 11 years old when he took his first piano lessons at the Compiègne Conservatory, in the class of Christine Muenier. He got quickly fascinated by the virtuoso repertoire, yet it wasn't until 10 years later, after he graduated from Paris Diderot University with a Bachelor's Art Degree, that he decided to return to studying piano at the professional level.

After a year of studies at the Beauvais Conservatory in the class of Philippe Tamborini, he was put in touch in 2011 with his current mentor, the celebrated Russian professor Rena Shereshevskaya. This encounter became decisive for Lucas: she quickly recognized in him a piano interpreter with a great future and accepted him in her class at the Alfred Cortot Paris Superior Music School to prepare him for the major international competitions. During his studies he was supported by the Cortot School, the Zaleski Foundation as well as by the Orchestre de l'Opéra de Massy (lead by Dominique Rouits) and the orchestral ensemble "Les voyages extraordinaires" (lead by Joachim Jousse). In 2014 he won the 1st prize at the 9th Gaillard International Piano Competition (France) before becoming one of the prize winners at the 15th Tchaikovsky Competition, when the world instantly took note of a startling and original new talent. In parallel with the studies at the Cortot School he obtained a Licence degree at the Paris National Superior Music Conservatory (CNSM).

A performer of fierce integrity and dazzling communicative power, Lucas Debargue draws inspiration for his playing from literature, painting, cinema, jazz and develops very personal interpretation of a carefully selected repertoire. Though the core piano repertoire is central to his career, Lucas Debargue is also keen to present works by lesser-known composers such as Nikolai Medtner, Samuel Maykapar or Nikolai Roslavets. He also composes his own music, and some of his works have already been premiered in Russia as well as in France.

In April 2016 he obtained a "Diplôme Supérieur de Concertiste" and a Special Cortot Prize at the Cortot School. At present he continues to do post-graduate work with Rena Shereshevskaya.

Source: lucas-debargue.com (2017)







































More photos


See also

Lucas Debargue plays Domenico Scarlatti, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Maurice Ravel, Franz Liszt, Erik Satie and Frédéric Chopin – Grange de Meslay, 2016 (HD 1080p)

Lucas Debargue – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Jean Sibelius: The Wood Nymph, En Saga, & Symphony No.5 in E flat major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Santtu-Matias Rouvali – Saturday, August 19, 2017 – Livestream














Under the baton of the talented Finnish conductor Santtu-Matias Rouvali, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra performs three works by Jean Sibelius: The Wood Nymph, Op.15, En Saga, Op.9, and Symphony No.5 in E flat major, Op.82.

Santtu-Matias Rouvali's first concert as chief conductor for the Gothenburg Symphony.

Live broadcast from Gothenburg Concert Hall


Saturday, August 19, 2017

Stockholm: 06:00 PM CEST

Los Angeles: 09:00 AM
Detroit, New York, Washington, Toronto: 12:00 PM

London: 05:00 PM
Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Madrid, Rome: 06:00 PM
Moscow, Kiev, Jerusalem, Athens: 07:00 PM
Abu Dhabi: 08:00 PM
Caracas: 12:00 PM
Brasília: 01:00 PM


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Beijing: 00:00 ΑM
Tokyo, Seoul: 01:00 AM
Sydney: 02:00 AM

[This video is no longer available]

Jean Sibelius (1865-1957)

♪ The Wood Nymph (Skogsrået), tone poem ("ballade") for orchestra, Op.15 (1895)


♪ En Saga, tone poem for orchestra, Op.9 (1892)


Intermission


♪ Symphony No.5 in E flat major, Op.82 (1914-1915, rev. 1919)

i. Tempo molto moderato – Allegro moderato – Presto – Più presto
ii. Andante mosso, quasi allegretto – Tranquillo – Poco a poco stretto – Tempo primo
iii. Allegro molto – Misterioso – Largamente assai – Un pochettino stretto


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Santtu-Matias Rouvali

(HD 1080p)















The Wood Nymph (Skogsrået), tone poem ("ballade") for orchestra, Op.15

Jean Sibelius wrote four works based on the poem "The Wood Nymph" by Finnish poet Viktor Rydberg: a song with piano accompaniment (1889); a tone poem for large orchestra (1894); a melodrama for speaker, strings, two horns, and piano (1894); and a piece for solo piano (1894). Aside from the text, the song is entirely independent of the other three works, which share a common tonality and common thematic material. All four works remained unpublished and unrecorded until 1996. The tone poem and the melodrama share the same opus number of 15.

The tone poem or "Ballade for Orchestra" as it is subtitled, is one of Sibelius' longest single-movement tone poems, lasting nearly 22 minutes in performance. Like his other orchestral works of the early 1890s – the Lemminkainen and Karelia Suites and the first version of the tone poem En Saga – The Wood Nymph is a powerful work of tremendous energy and power. In four sections, the work starts with a portrait of Bjorn, the hero of the work, for full brass over a pulsing string background similar to that of Marcia of the Karelia Suite. In the second section, the heroic music continues as Bjorn sets off into the forest, but the accompaniment changes as he encounters the jealous goblins and nymphs portrayed in a chromatic dance in the winds. The third section of the work begins Moderato with an ardent theme in the cello depicting the Wood Nymph. Her dance before Bjorn is accompanied by winds, tambourine, and triangle. The fourth section of the work is dark and weighty, with an aching violin theme over the low brass and bass drum describing the broken hero whose heart has been lost to the wood nymph.

Although it is not on the same level of inspiration as En Saga, The Wood Nymph's complete disappearance from the repertoire is inexplicable. The disappearance of the melodrama, however, is more easily explained. While the work is as attractively scored and as well-composed as the tone poem, the whole genre of the melodrama – that is, a piece of music with narrator – has disappeared from the concert hall. Like the tone poem, the melodrama is in four sections. However, the melodrama is much more compact than the tone poem, lasting a little over ten minutes in performance and is much more succinct in the thematic development. The solo piano piece based on The Wood Nymph is very brief and deals only with the final section of the music of the tone poem and melodrama. It has no opus number.

Source: James Leonard (allmusic.com)


En Saga, tone poem for orchestra, Op.9

This is one of Sibelius' earliest orchestral works, and it brims with youthful energy. It is also a highly atmospheric work, clearly evocative of the composer's beloved Finland – its people, proud history, countryside and landscapes. The title (Swedish, rather than Finnish, meaning "A Fairy Tale") suggests it is a programmatic work, and indeed there does seem to be a musical "story" present; the composer, however, never identified any specific extra-musical inspiration.

Sibelius wrote the work at the suggestion of conductor Robert Kajanus, who wanted a composition that would have wide appeal; in completing it Sibelius drew on themes from an unperformed and unpublished octet for strings and winds he had written in Berlin. At its February 16, 1893, premiere in Helsinki (led by the composer), En Saga was not a success, suffering as it did from a lack of formal organization. Sibelius' 1902 revision, however – coming, perhaps not insignificantly, directly after the composition of his Symphony No.2 – overcame these difficulties, and is now regarded as one of his finest orchestral works.

The work begins mysteriously, the music seeming to awaken and gather momentum, as strings swirl and woodwinds bark and chirp. This gives rise to a lively rhythmic theme of characteristically Sibelian character; there is something both mournful and proud in the melody – simple, yet striking. This theme is the first of three that, by development and interaction, become the de facto "characters" in this musical tale; they each struggle to maintain hold on the music as becomes more conflicted, eventually rising to a violent climax. Eventually, the musical conflict is resolved, and only the solo clarinet – accompanied by gentle strings – is left to witness the end.

Throughout En Saga Sibelius puts the woodwinds front and center, often using their dissonant punctuations to herald the beginning of a new section or idea. The color and character of these woodwind passages are perhaps the most identifiably Scandinavian musical feature of the score. While there are influences here of Rimsky-Korsakov and other Russian composers, En Saga must be regarded as one of the composer's most individual and satisfying early works. A typical performance lasts from about 17 to 20 minutes.

Source: Rovi Staff (allmusic.com)


Symphony No.5 in E flat major, Op.82

Sibelius composed three versions of this work between 1915 and 1919, and led the premiere of the last one on October 21, 1921, in Helsinki. It is abstemiously scored: double winds, brass without tuba, tympani, strings. In time for his 50th birthday, which was celebrated as a national holiday in Finland, Sibelius completed and conducted a first version of his Fifth Symphony, in four movements – startlingly longer than the final version and comparatively inchoate. Only string bass parts have survived a revision begun immediately after the premiere. Still not satisfied, Sibelius rethought and reworked it over two years. What eventuated has become the most popular of his seven symphonies: a triumph of structural ingenuity, and a validation of non-programmatic music when Lisztians of every stripe – most notably Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler – were deconstructing "absolute" art.

What finally evolved in the first movement is a structure that begins with the double exposition of two theme-groups, the second of them in G (where the strings enter). Sibelius didn't just restate his basic materials; his range of mood extended to a passage marked lugubre for bassoons. Through a variety of keys he reaches a long development section, which builds toward recapitulation whereupon 12/8 time, after a slow acceleration, suddenly switches to 3/4, E flat changes to B major, and Allegro moderato becomes the new basic tempo. What follows was salvaged from a separate Scherzo movement in the 1915 version – complete with Trio – but one that segues into the tonic recap of theme-groups one and two, followed by a coda that quickens to Presto.

The Andante mosso, quasi allegretto is as simple, structurally, as the first movement is complex, but hardly simplistic: in effect, there are several variations on a rhythm – two groups of five quarter notes separated by a quarter note rest. This "theme" is played first by violas and cellos after a motif for clarinets, bassoons, and horns that returns as a countermelody. Sibelius creates "six tunes" (Michael Steinberg's diction), more or less tranquil on the surface but underneath mysterious, even briefly turbulent, with a translucent passage (violins divided into eight parts) that bespeaks pure genius. Also beneath the surface is a first statement (by low strings) of the proclamative theme that will dominate the finale.

Strings play the first theme in what some Sibelians have called a rondo, but others insist is sonata-structure, a whirring, buzzing business that culminates in the heroic second theme for pairs of horns, playing whole notes, in thirds. Momentum is sustained while the two subjects pursue a complex course through various keys and mass dissonances that only the horn theme, reassigned to trumpets, can finally cut through, like a machete through jungle growth. Trombones and horns join in, until Sibelius decrees silence, followed by six chords that bring his odyssey into a safe and happy harbor.

Source: Roger Dettmer (allmusic.com)















Santtu-Matias Rouvali (b. 1985) is a Finnish conductor and percussionist. From a family of musicians, Rouvali's parents played in the Lahti Symphony Orchestra. He is the youngest of the three sons in his family. One of his older brothers died in a car accident at age 23.

Rouvali learned percussion as a youngster, and continued his studies at the Sibelius Academy. Rouvali completed in the Eurovision Young Soloists Finnish qualifier in 2004 as a percussionist. As a percussionist, he performed with such orchestras as the Mikkeli City Orchestra, the Lahti Symphony Orchestra, and the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. At age 22, he focused more on studies in conducting at the Sibelius Academy, where his teachers included Jorma Panula, Leif Segerstam and Hannu Lintu.

In September 2009, Rouvali guest-conducted the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra as an emergency substitute conductor. He first guest-conducted the Tapiola Sinfonietta in November 2010. Later in the same month, the Tapiola Sinfonietta named Rouvali an artist-in-association with the orchestra, effective September 2011, with an agreement of 3 years.

Rouvali first guest-conducted the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra in January 2010. He subsequently returned as a guest conductor in December 2011. In September 2012, the orchestra announced the appointment of Rouvali as its chief conductor, effective with the 2013-2014 season, with an initial contract of 3 years. His current Tampere contract is through 2019.

Outside of Finland, Rouvali first guest-conducted the Copenhagen Philharmonic in November 2011. He subsequently became principal guest conductor of the Copenhagen Philharmonic with the 2013-2014 season. In August 2014, Rouvali made his first guest-conducting appearance with the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra (GSO). In May 2016, the GSO announced the appointment of Rouvali as its next chief conductor, effective with the 2017-2018 season, with an initial contract of 4 years.

Rouvali has made commercial recordings with the Oulu Philharmonic Orchestra for Ondine, and with the Tampere Philharmonic for Orfeo.

Source: en.wikipedia.org


The 2017/2018 season sees Santtu-Matias Rouvali begin two new tenures; Chief Conductor of the Gothenburg Symphony and Principal Guest Conductor of the Philharmonia Orchestra, alongside these positions he continues his longstanding Chief Conductor-ship with the Tampere Philharmonic close to his home in Finland. Hailed by The Guardian as "the latest sit-up-and-listen talent to emerge from the great Finnish conducting tradition", until last season Santtu-Matias Rouvali was also Principal Guest Conductor of the Copenhagen Philharmonic.

Rouvali has upcoming debuts with the Leipzig Gewandhausorchester, Münchner Philharmoniker and Orquesta Nacionale de España in Madrid, as well as regular relationships with other orchestras across Europe, including the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France in Paris, Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin; and has ambitious touring plans with his own orchestras over the next few seasons in Europe, Japan and North America. His first season as Chief Conductor in Gothenburg includes a substantial Nordic tour with pianist Hélène Grimaud.

Previously a Dudamel Fellow at the conducting programme with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, last season he made a triumphant return as a highlight of their subscription season, alongside other American debuts with the Minnesota and Cincinnati symphony orchestras.

In June 2017, as Chief Conductor-designate, he joined Gustavo Dudamel and the Gothenburg Symphony in their El Sistema Side by Side project with the Gothenburg Symphony, which has been a hugely successful summer camp for children and young people.

As another cornerstone to his tenure in Gothenburg, he looks forward to adding his mark to the Orchestra's impressive recording legacy. Rouvali's latest disc – of Nielsen and Sibelius' violin concertos is with the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra and Baiba Skride – was released in summer 2015 on ORFEO. Rouvali has been Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the Tampere Philharmonic since 2013, and in addition to his other recordings, highlights of the tenure so far include a Sibelius symphony cycle in autumn 2015, and the Orchestra's first tour to Japan in spring 2017 where they were accompanied by an exhibition of original Moomin drawings by Tove Jansson to mark the opening of the new museum at the Tampere Hall.

Alongside an extremely busy symphonic conducting career, as Chief Conductor in Tampere he has conducted Verdi's La forza del destino with Tampere Opera and his next project with them, in spring 2018, is a world premiere of Olli Kortekangas's My Brother's Keeper (Veljeni vartija) with Tampere Opera.

Source: harrisonparrott.com














See also

Santtu-Matias Rouvali – All the posts

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts