Jakub Józef Orliński

Jakub Józef Orliński
Jakub Józef Orliński, countertenor. Photo by M. Sharkey

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Giacomo Susani: Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet – Giacomo Susani, QuartettoCMantova (HD 1080p)














The Italian guitarist Giacomo Susani and the QuartettoCMantova perform Giacomo Susani's Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet. Recorded in Padua on February 18, 2018.



Giacomo Susani (b. 1995)

♪ Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet (2016)

i. La Tempesta
ii. Liberamente, non troppo lento
iii. Omaggio a Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco

Giacomo Susani, guitar

QuartettoCMantova:
Luca Braga, violin
Pierantonio Cazzulani, violin
Klaus Manfrini, viola
Paolo Perucchetti, cello

Padua, February 18, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Giacomo Susani is an Italian guitarist (Padua, 29 April 1995). He started playing the guitar at the age of 7 and eventually studied under the direction of Stefano Grondona at the Conservatorio Arrigo Pedrollo in Vicenza where he graduated with the highest marks and honours in 2013. He is currently continuing his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London, in the class of Michael Lewin, where he has completed his Bachelor of Music (2014-2016), gaining First Class Honours and the discretionary Bache Fund Prize and his Master of Arts (2016-2018), gaining High Distinction, Dip Ram for an outstanding final recital and Gershon Ellenbogen / Maccabaen Award; here is now studying his Advanced Diploma in Performance (2018-2019). On his entrance to the Academy he was awarded the prestigious Julian Bream Trust Scholarship, after an audition with Julian Bream himself.

Over the years he has taken part in masterclasses and attended advanced courses with leading guitarists such as Paul Galbraith, Oscar Ghiglia, David Russell, Carles Trepat, Fabio Zanon. In particular he obtained scholarships and diplomas of merit in Oscar Ghiglia's renewed guitar courses at the Accademica Musicale Chigiana in Siena.


He has regularly taken part in guitar competitions from an early age, always obtaining excellent results and, on many occasions, winning first prize. In October 2016 he won First Prize at the London International Guitar Competition playing on this occasion the premiere of Orpheus by Graham Lynch for guitar and orchestra. Among the most recent prizes are a Special Prize for the best performance of a newly commissioned piece at Guitar Masters Competition in Poland, 2nd Prize at Gianni Bergamo Classical Music Award in Switzerland and ESTA Prize for the best performance of a contemporary piece at Forum Gitarre Wien Competition, all of them awarded between September and November 2016.


In April 2017 he was awarded First Prize at the Ivor Mairants Guitar Award in London after which he became a Yeoman of The Musicians' Company. Shortly after, he won the Ian Fleming Award following an audition for Help Musicians UK as well as the Star Award of the Countess of Munster Musical Trust and First Prize at the David Russell Guitar Award. In July 2018 he won 2nd Prize at the 7th Changsha International Guitar Competition (China). In 2016 he was also selected by the International Guitar Foundation under their Young Artist Platform Scheme for a series of concerts across the UK and in 2018 as a "Young Star" for EuroStrings – European Guitar Festival Collaborative (the first European platform in the field of classical guitar gathering 14 classical guitar festivals that have a professional structure to enable further education and professional development of emerging guitar players): with this opportunity, he played and took masterclasses in most of European Festivals (Austria, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, Finland, Estonia, Holland).


As a performer he regularly appears in important venues in Italy and other countries as soloist, soloist with orchestra and in chamber ensembles, the most important venues including London, Cambridge, Canterbury, Bristol, Barcelona, Vienna, Milan, Padua, Venice, Budapest.


In February 2015 the recording studio Stradivarius brought out his first solo CD "Giacomo Susani plays Petrassi, Bach, Tansman, Weiss", which obtained excellent reviews from the public and critics alike published most notably in "BBC Music", "Gendai Guitar", "Il Fronimo", "Classical Guitar" and "Amadeus"; in 2016 he took part in a recording project J.S. Bach. The four suites for Lute, under the direction of Stefano Grondona, playing the "Suite 1006a"; in Autumn 2018 Stradivarius is publishing his second solo CD "Gebeth. Romantic music for Guitar. Mertz - Regondi".


In 2017 the Polish composer Marek Pasieczny dedicated to him his own solo guitar composition called Tate Sonata. Besides performing, he works in the field of composition, writing and premiering in London most recently Quintet for Guitar and Strings, Songs of Elegance and Wisdom for Soprano and Guitar and Of Dark Tales for two Guitars. Quintet and Songs of Elegance and Wisdom have been published by Armelin Musica (Padua, IT, 2017). He is also the Artistic Director of Momùs-More Music, a Musical Association based in Italy which promotes and organises classical music concerts.


Giacomo Susani plays a guitar made by the English luthier David Rubio (1996), a guitar made by the Spanish luthier Domingo Esteso (1926) and a guitar by the German luthier Matthias Dammann (2013) kindly provided by Calleva Foundation (London).


Giacomo is grateful for being kindly supported by the Julian Bream Trust, the Calleva Foundation, the Worshipful Company of Musicians, Help Musicians UK and The Countess of Munster Musical Trust.


Source: giacomosusani.com




























More photos


See also


Giacomo Susani – All the posts

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Giacomo Susani plays Goffredo Petrassi (HD 1080p)














The Italian guitarist Giacomo Susani plays Goffredo Petrassi's Nunc. Recorded in Padua in October 2016.



In 1971, Goffredo Petrassi composed "Nunc", taking the guitar into a complex deployment of colors and timbres.

The title "Nunc", which means "now, at this time" in Latin, would seemingly relate the music to the realm of "moment form", a style of composition developed by Stockhausen in the late 1960's. And in fact the score bears this out: each of the five sections of the piece contains like gestures, which display their moods and then suddenly shift to new material...

Petrassi's subtle use of instrumental color includes percussive aspects of the guitar, such as the use of left-hand pizzicato... and extensive use of golpe in the two slow sections... Other effects include wide use of tremolo, harmonics, tambora, and rapid arpeggios, all in order to produce the greatest contrast of texture possble. The overall effect is truly kaleidoscopic – images constantly transform, while never repeating, simultaneously giving the viewer impressions that are novel, yet familiar.



Goffredo Petrassi (1904-2003)

♪ Nunc (1971)

Giacomo Susani, guitar

(Guitar Domingo Esteso, 1926)

Padua, October 2016

(HD 1080p)















Giacomo Susani is an Italian guitarist (Padua, 29 April 1995). He started playing the guitar at the age of 7 and eventually studied under the direction of Stefano Grondona at the Conservatorio Arrigo Pedrollo in Vicenza where he graduated with the highest marks and honours in 2013. He is currently continuing his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London, in the class of Michael Lewin, where he has completed his Bachelor of Music (2014-2016), gaining First Class Honours and the discretionary Bache Fund Prize and his Master of Arts (2016-2018), gaining High Distinction, Dip Ram for an outstanding final recital and Gershon Ellenbogen / Maccabaen Award; here is now studying his Advanced Diploma in Performance (2018-2019). On his entrance to the Academy he was awarded the prestigious Julian Bream Trust Scholarship, after an audition with Julian Bream himself.

Over the years he has taken part in masterclasses and attended advanced courses with leading guitarists such as Paul Galbraith, Oscar Ghiglia, David Russell, Carles Trepat, Fabio Zanon. In particular he obtained scholarships and diplomas of merit in Oscar Ghiglia's renewed guitar courses at the Accademica Musicale Chigiana in Siena.


He has regularly taken part in guitar competitions from an early age, always obtaining excellent results and, on many occasions, winning first prize. In October 2016 he won First Prize at the London International Guitar Competition playing on this occasion the premiere of Orpheus by Graham Lynch for guitar and orchestra. Among the most recent prizes are a Special Prize for the best performance of a newly commissioned piece at Guitar Masters Competition in Poland, 2nd Prize at Gianni Bergamo Classical Music Award in Switzerland and ESTA Prize for the best performance of a contemporary piece at Forum Gitarre Wien Competition, all of them awarded between September and November 2016.


In April 2017 he was awarded First Prize at the Ivor Mairants Guitar Award in London after which he became a Yeoman of The Musicians' Company. Shortly after, he won the Ian Fleming Award following an audition for Help Musicians UK as well as the Star Award of the Countess of Munster Musical Trust and First Prize at the David Russell Guitar Award. In July 2018 he won 2nd Prize at the 7th Changsha International Guitar Competition (China). In 2016 he was also selected by the International Guitar Foundation under their Young Artist Platform Scheme for a series of concerts across the UK and in 2018 as a "Young Star" for EuroStrings – European Guitar Festival Collaborative (the first European platform in the field of classical guitar gathering 14 classical guitar festivals that have a professional structure to enable further education and professional development of emerging guitar players): with this opportunity, he played and took masterclasses in most of European Festivals (Austria, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, Finland, Estonia, Holland).


As a performer he regularly appears in important venues in Italy and other countries as soloist, soloist with orchestra and in chamber ensembles, the most important venues including London, Cambridge, Canterbury, Bristol, Barcelona, Vienna, Milan, Padua, Venice, Budapest.


In February 2015 the recording studio Stradivarius brought out his first solo CD "Giacomo Susani plays Petrassi, Bach, Tansman, Weiss", which obtained excellent reviews from the public and critics alike published most notably in "BBC Music", "Gendai Guitar", "Il Fronimo", "Classical Guitar" and "Amadeus"; in 2016 he took part in a recording project J.S. Bach. The four suites for Lute, under the direction of Stefano Grondona, playing the "Suite 1006a"; in Autumn 2018 Stradivarius is publishing his second solo CD "Gebeth. Romantic music for Guitar. Mertz - Regondi".


In 2017 the Polish composer Marek Pasieczny dedicated to him his own solo guitar composition called Tate Sonata. Besides performing, he works in the field of composition, writing and premiering in London most recently Quintet for Guitar and Strings, Songs of Elegance and Wisdom for Soprano and Guitar and Of Dark Tales for two Guitars. Quintet and Songs of Elegance and Wisdom have been published by Armelin Musica (Padua, IT, 2017). He is also the Artistic Director of Momùs-More Music, a Musical Association based in Italy which promotes and organises classical music concerts.


Giacomo Susani plays a guitar made by the English luthier David Rubio (1996), a guitar made by the Spanish luthier Domingo Esteso (1926) and a guitar by the German luthier Matthias Dammann (2013) kindly provided by Calleva Foundation (London).


Giacomo is grateful for being kindly supported by the Julian Bream Trust, the Calleva Foundation, the Worshipful Company of Musicians, Help Musicians UK and The Countess of Munster Musical Trust.


Source: giacomosusani.com








































More photos


See also


Giacomo Susani – All the posts

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Tomaso Albinoni: Il Concilio dei Pianeti – Chiara Taigi, Laura Brioli, José Luis Sola, I Solisti Veneti, Claudio Scimone, Stefano Poda
















In Memoriam Claudio Scimone (1934-2018)

Recorded in Padua's awe-inspiring Palazzo della Ragione, Tomaso Albinoni's serenata teatrale "Il Concilio dei Pianeti" is performed here in its first stage production in modern times by the great Baroque ensemble I Solisti Veneti under its founder and principal conductor Claudio Scimone.

The Solisti Veneti – one of the world's leading chamber orchestras specialized in historical performance practice – were among the first to rediscover the beauty and richness of Albinoni's vocal music. The "theatrical serenade" was conceived from the start as a stage work as presented in this performance. Recitatives, arias, duets, choruses are sung by allegorical figures representing Eternity (soprano), Jupiter (mezzo-soprano) and Mars (tenor). Written in 1729 for the birth of the Dauphin of France, the piece was conceived as a celebratory work to mark the happy occasion.

The "Council of the Planets" could not have found a better location than Padua's Palazzo della Ragione, which is decorated with frescoes from the 15th century depicting the signs of the Zodiac, liberal arts, professions, etc. Occupying pride of place in the 80-meter long "salone" is a wooden horse built in 1466 and attributed to Donatello.

Following a practice common in Albinoni's day, conductor Claudio Scimone inserts "three stupendous arias" (Scimone) that were written by Albinoni in 1710, but were not part of the "Concilio". The practice was intended to awaken interest in a new work by inserting already well-known pieces within it – a subtle but presumably effective form of Baroque self-advertising!



Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1751)

♪ Il Concilio dei Pianeti (Serenata a tre voci) (1729)

Serenata in due tempi

Libretto: Girolamo Baruffaldi

Eternità..........Chiara Taigi, soprano
Giove..........Laura Brioli, mezzo-soprano
Marte..........José Luis Sola, tenor

I Solisti Veneti
Conductor: Claudio Scimone

Stage direction, choreography, costumes and lights by Stefano Poda
Video direction by Mauro Santini and Tiziano Mancini

Running Time: 92 minutes

Padova, Sala della Ragione, 2009

(HD 720p)

















On September 6, 2018, we sadly lost another pioneer of the early music movement. Claudio Scimone, a student of Dimitri Mitropoulos and Franco Ferrara, was primarily known as the founder of the string ensemble "I Solisti Veneti". Together with Neville Marriner's "Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields", he stood at the forefront of fresh and bouncy interpretations of the Italian Baroque repertoire, offering leaner textures, and more animated tempos.

Scimone and "I Solisti" made over 350 recordings, and they appeared in roughly 6,000 concerts all over the world. Celebrating its 50 anniversary in 2008, the European Parliament honored the Orchestra as "ambassadors of culture and music across the borders". Incredibly, Scimone conducted almost all concerts and recordings with the ensemble, but he never pandered to the limelight. Instead, the gentle and unassuming conductor and musicologist focused on reviving lost Italian works by doing all the research and publication work in order to bring unknown compositions to the public. 

The first modern recording of Vivaldi's 1727 "Orlando Furioso" with Marilyn Horne and Victoria de los Ángeles took place in Verona in 1977. This performance generated great public and scholarly excitement for Vivaldi's theatrical works, and Scimone followed up his success with revivals of "Il Nascimento dell'Aurora", "Il Concilio dei Pianeti", and the intermezzo "Pimpinone" by Tomaso Albinoni. 

As one of the collaborators of the Rossini Foundation, Scimone conducted and recorded among others, the first modern performances of Rossini's "Mosè in Egitto", and "Maometto II". Further musicological research resulted in the publication of the first modern edition of the violin concertos and sonatas of Giuseppe Tartini. And let's not forget that he conducted the first recording of Muzio Clementi's Symphonies with the Philharmonia of London. Scimone is also the author of an acclaimed treatise on performing practice, and he kept commissioning works by up-and-coming composers. One of the most respected musicologists researching Italian music from the end of the Renaissance through Rossini, Scimone was always passionate about passing on his excitement to the next generation. For almost thirty years he was the Director of the Padua Conservatory of Music, and he quietly shared his love, devotion and passion for music.

Source: Georg Predota, September 12, 2018 (interlude.hk)















Born in Venice in 1671, Tomaso Albinoni was the eldest son of a wealthy paper merchant who owned several shops in Venice. It is not known who Albinoni's teachers were – though Legrenzi's name has been suggested – but we do know that Tomaso took both violin and singing lessons. With his inherited family wealth, Albinoni found no need to take a musical job in the church or at court: his independent means enabled him to remain a dilettante. His intentions were, however, quite clearly to devote himself to music, for on his father's death he effectively relinquished managerial control of the family business, though he continued for a short while to receive a share of the profits. In 1721 the business was taken over, after a lawsuit, by an old creditor of his father, and Albinoni's private income all but ceased.

Albinoni first came to prominence as a composer in 1694 in the opera house, where his melodic style proved highly popular. Over the next forty-seven years he wrote more than fifty operas, along with some thirty cantatas, around sixty sonatas and at least sixty concertos. Although some of Albinoni's music has been criticized as lacking in harmonic finesse, he was undoubtedly a remarkable melodist and, perhaps due to his rather isolated lifestyle, a highly individual composer.

Around 1740, a collection of Albinoni's violin sonatas was published in France as a posthumous work, and scholars long presumed that meant that Albinoni had died by that time. However, it appears he lived on in Venice in obscurity; a record from the parish of San Barnaba indicates Tomaso Albinoni died in Venice in 1751, of diabetes mellitus.

Source: Robert King, 1990 (hyperion-records.co.uk) / en.wikipedia.org

















More photos


See also

Vivaldi Ma Non Solo: Marita Paparizou sings Antonio Vivaldi, George Frideric Handel & Ferdinando Bertoni – I Solisti Veneti, Claudio Scimone (Audio videos)

Monday, September 24, 2018

Giacomo Susani plays Joaquin Turina, Dionisio Aguado and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (HD 1080p)














The Italian guitarist Giacomo Susani plays Joaquín Turina's Fandanguillo, Op.36, Dionisio Aguado's Rondo Brillante No.2 Op.2 in A minor, and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Capriccio diabolico ("Omaggio a Paganini"), Op.85. Recorded at Off Theatre, Padua, in December 2015.



The Fandanguillo was one of the many products of the emergence of Andrés Segovia as a guitar virtuoso. In the 1920s, early in his career, Segovia asked Joaquín Turina to compose some solo guitar works for him. In 1926, Turina produced the Fandanguillo, which he said was derived in part from some of the traditional music of his homeland. The rhythmic qualities of flamenco music are never far away in this work, and the zapateado – the percussive sounds produced by the heels of a dancer's shoes hitting the floor – are called to mind in the percussive sounds drawn from the the guitar strings. This short work is for the most part an extroverted one, with a more mellow central section providing contrast. A run of harmonics toward the end of the piece leads into its quiet chordal ending.

Source: Chris Morrison (allmusic.com)



As Canadian guitarist Drew Henderson mentions for the Rondo Brillante No.2 Op.2 by Dionisio Aguado, "The theme of this Rondo bears a striking resemblance to Beethoven's famous ‘Pathetique’ Sonata, Op.13 No.8. Given that this piece was published in the year of Beethoven's death (1827), perhaps we can call it a ‘tribute’. However, the dedication is to Aguado's contemporary, François de Fossa". 



A few years before leaving Italy in 1938 in the face of rising anti-Semitism, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco had written this charming ten-minute piece, ostensibly as a tribute to Paganini. Having composed it for the guitar virtuoso Andrés Segovia, he consciously attempted to draw a parallel between himself and Paganini. Will the latter ever be separated from that disparaging word, diabolical? Naturally, one will recognize thematic references to Paganini here, but the music is still Castelnuovo-Tedesco's own, even if the listener is often stylistically taken back to the early nineteenth century. The work opens with a dramatic introduction based on the main theme, then goes on to present that theme in a lively creation that, not surprisingly, divulges an Italianate character. The melodic material is deftly worked out as the music takes on a heroic manner in the central sections. In the latter part of the piece, it grows increasingly difficult, as rapid-fire notes heighten tension and bring on blazing colors, the music building toward a virtuosic climax. This brilliant piece will appeal to most fanciers of serious guitar music.

Source: Robert Cummings (allmusic.com)




Joaquín Turina (1882-1949)

♪ Fandanguillo, Op.36 (1926)




Dionisio Aguado (1784-1849)

♪ Rondo Brillante No.2 Op.2 in A minor (1827)




Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895-1968)

♪ Capriccio diabolico ("Omaggio a Paganini"), Op.85 (1935)


Giacomo Susani, guitar

(Guitar Domingo Esteso, 1926)

Off Theatre, Padua, December 2015

(HD 1080p)















Giacomo Susani is an Italian guitarist (Padua, 29 April 1995). He started playing the guitar at the age of 7 and eventually studied under the direction of Stefano Grondona at the Conservatorio Arrigo Pedrollo in Vicenza where he graduated with the highest marks and honours in 2013. He is currently continuing his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London, in the class of Michael Lewin, where he has completed his Bachelor of Music (2014-2016), gaining First Class Honours and the discretionary Bache Fund Prize and his Master of Arts (2016-2018), gaining High Distinction, Dip Ram for an outstanding final recital and Gershon Ellenbogen / Maccabaen Award; here is now studying his Advanced Diploma in Performance (2018-2019). On his entrance to the Academy he was awarded the prestigious Julian Bream Trust Scholarship, after an audition with Julian Bream himself.

Over the years he has taken part in masterclasses and attended advanced courses with leading guitarists such as Paul Galbraith, Oscar Ghiglia, David Russell, Carles Trepat, Fabio Zanon. In particular he obtained scholarships and diplomas of merit in Oscar Ghiglia's renewed guitar courses at the Accademica Musicale Chigiana in Siena.


He has regularly taken part in guitar competitions from an early age, always obtaining excellent results and, on many occasions, winning first prize. In October 2016 he won First Prize at the London International Guitar Competition playing on this occasion the premiere of Orpheus by Graham Lynch for guitar and orchestra. Among the most recent prizes are a Special Prize for the best performance of a newly commissioned piece at Guitar Masters Competition in Poland, 2nd Prize at Gianni Bergamo Classical Music Award in Switzerland and ESTA Prize for the best performance of a contemporary piece at Forum Gitarre Wien Competition, all of them awarded between September and November 2016.


In April 2017 he was awarded First Prize at the Ivor Mairants Guitar Award in London after which he became a Yeoman of The Musicians' Company. Shortly after, he won the Ian Fleming Award following an audition for Help Musicians UK as well as the Star Award of the Countess of Munster Musical Trust and First Prize at the David Russell Guitar Award. In July 2018 he won 2nd Prize at the 7th Changsha International Guitar Competition (China). In 2016 he was also selected by the International Guitar Foundation under their Young Artist Platform Scheme for a series of concerts across the UK and in 2018 as a "Young Star" for EuroStrings – European Guitar Festival Collaborative (the first European platform in the field of classical guitar gathering 14 classical guitar festivals that have a professional structure to enable further education and professional development of emerging guitar players): with this opportunity, he played and took masterclasses in most of European Festivals (Austria, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, Finland, Estonia, Holland).


As a performer he regularly appears in important venues in Italy and other countries as soloist, soloist with orchestra and in chamber ensembles, the most important venues including London, Cambridge, Canterbury, Bristol, Barcelona, Vienna, Milan, Padua, Venice, Budapest.


In February 2015 the recording studio Stradivarius brought out his first solo CD "Giacomo Susani plays Petrassi, Bach, Tansman, Weiss", which obtained excellent reviews from the public and critics alike published most notably in "BBC Music", "Gendai Guitar", "Il Fronimo", "Classical Guitar" and "Amadeus"; in 2016 he took part in a recording project J.S. Bach. The four suites for Lute, under the direction of Stefano Grondona, playing the "Suite 1006a"; in Autumn 2018 Stradivarius is publishing his second solo CD "Gebeth. Romantic music for Guitar. Mertz - Regondi".


In 2017 the Polish composer Marek Pasieczny dedicated to him his own solo guitar composition called Tate Sonata. Besides performing, he works in the field of composition, writing and premiering in London most recently Quintet for Guitar and Strings, Songs of Elegance and Wisdom for Soprano and Guitar and Of Dark Tales for two Guitars. Quintet and Songs of Elegance and Wisdom have been published by Armelin Musica (Padua, IT, 2017). He is also the Artistic Director of Momùs-More Music, a Musical Association based in Italy which promotes and organises classical music concerts.


Giacomo Susani plays a guitar made by the English luthier David Rubio (1996), a guitar made by the Spanish luthier Domingo Esteso (1926) and a guitar by the German luthier Matthias Dammann (2013) kindly provided by Calleva Foundation (London).


Giacomo is grateful for being kindly supported by the Julian Bream Trust, the Calleva Foundation, the Worshipful Company of Musicians, Help Musicians UK and The Countess of Munster Musical Trust.


Source: giacomosusani.com








































More photos


See also

Giacomo Susani – All the posts

Friday, September 21, 2018

David Bowie: The Berlin Trilogy – Brian Eno, Kurt Weill, Lou Reed, Ralf Hütter, Philip Glass, Iggy Pop – Jennie Abrahamson, Moto Boy, Magnus Carlson, Göteborgs Symfoniska Kör, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Hans Ek (HD 1080p)














A celebration of David Bowie, based on the albums of the Berlin Trilogy: "Low", "Heroes" and "Lodger".

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Magnus Carlson, Jennie Abrahamson, Moto Boy, Göteborgs Symfoniska Kör and the Swedish conductor Hans Ek perform David Bowie's classic songs from his successful career, with a natural finale in Where Are We Now from 2013, where Bowie looks back on his time in Berlin.

Music made with producer Brian Eno in a creative explosion where the Berlin Wall became a symbolic watershed for David Bowie's creativity, going from punchy pop tunes to symphonically coloured, electronic music. Heroes gave a whole generation a voice, and became a powerful battle cry for all those who wanted to shape their lives on their own terms.

Hans Ek is the initiator and has orchestrated this tribute concert.

Recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall, on October 8, 2016.



David Bowie (1947-2016)

The Berlin Trilogy


David Bowie

1. Low Suite (1977)

i. Introduction
ii. Subterraneans / Some are / Subterraneans
iii. Always Crashing in the Same Car
iv. Weeping Wall
v. Sound and Vision
vi. Be my Wife
vii. Art Decade
viii. Word on a Wing


David Bowie & Brian Eno (b. 1948)

ix. Warszawa


Kurt Weill (1900-1950)

2. Ballade of the Drowning Girl (from "Das Berliner Requiem")


Lou Reed (1942-2013)

3. Berlin (1973)


Ralf Hütter (b. 1946)

4. Trans-Europe Express (1977)


David Bowie & Brian Eno

5. Heroes (1977)


Philip Glass (b. 1937)

6. First movement from Symphony No.4 "Heroes" (1996, based on the album "Heroes" by David Bowie)


David Bowie

7. Blackout (1977)
8. Sense of Doubt (1977)
9. Sons of the Silent Age (1977)


David Bowie & Brian Eno

10. Fantastic Voyage (1979)


David Bowie

11. African Night Flight (1979)


David Bowie & Brian Eno

12. Look Back in Anger (1979)
13. Ashes to Ashes (1980)


Iggy Pop (b. 1947) 

14. The Passenger (1988)


Brian Eno

15. Under Stars (1983)


David Bowie 

16. Blackstar (2016)


Magnus Carlson, soloist
Moto Boy, soloist
Jennie Abrahamson, soloist

Göteborgs Symfoniska Kör

Jonas Östholm, keyboard
Oskar Nilsson, bass
Niklas Lind, drums

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Arranged and conducted by Hans Ek

Gothenburg Concert Hall, October 8, 2016

(HD 1080p)















The History of David Bowie's Berlin Trilogy: "Low", "Heroes" and "Lodger"

By 1976, David Bowie's life in Los Angeles was in free fall. Though "Fame" and "Golden Years" were Top 10 hits the year before, Bowie was lost in a haze of cocaine addiction. To escape the drug scene in L.A., Bowie and wife Angela headed for Europe; after stops in Switzerland and France, Bowie settled in Berlin, a city then still divided by the Berlin Wall. The next three years would be one of Bowie's most productive periods, as he recorded a trio of albums that became known as his Berlin Trilogy. Low and Heroes debuted in 1977, with Lodger arriving two years later.

"Life in L.A. had left me with an overwhelming sense of foreboding", Bowie told Uncut. "I had approached the brink of drug-induced calamity one too many times, and it was essential to take some kind of positive action. For many years Berlin had appealed to me as a sort of sanctuary-like situation. It was one of the few cities where I could move around in virtual anonymity. I was going broke; it was cheap to live. For some reason, Berliners just didn't care. Well, not about an English rock singer, anyway."

Angela Bowie, in Backstage Passes: Life on the Wild Side with David Bowie, said that "Berlin called to him in other ways. He chose to live in a section of the city as bleak, anonymous, and culturally lost as possible: Schoneberg, populated largely by Turkish immigrants. He took an apartment above an auto parts store and ate at the local workingmen's cafe. Talk about alienation".

Bowie was joined in Berlin by Iggy Pop, who was battling his own issues with heroin. Bowie would produce Iggy's solo albums "The Idiot" and "Lust for Life" in 1977. Brian Eno of Roxy Music and longtime Bowie producer Tony Visconti also came to Berlin; they would contribute to all three of Bowie's subsequent Berlin projects.

"Working with Bowie is much more than going to a studio", Visconti said in an interview with Sound on Sound. "It's a social event, too. We would eat together, go to shows together, go to clubs together, and really soak in the local culture. That was always his way of working".

Source: Frank Mastropolo, 2016 (ultimateclassicrock.com)































































More photos


See also


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts


Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Johann Sebastian Bach: Lute Suite No.4 in E major, BWV 1006a – Giacomo Susani (HD 1080p)














The Italian guitarist Giacomo Susani plays Johann Sebastian Bach's Lute Suite No.4 in E major, BWV 1006a. Recorded in August 2015.



The seven compositions for lute by Johann Sebastian Bach are lonely pinnacles among the European works written for this instrument in the last years of the late Baroque Period. Four of them were actually conceived for the lute, while the three remaining ones are transcriptions or arrangements of works for solo violin or cello. The ad libitum practice of the late Baroque allowed for considerably more profound transformations of the original sound structure than would have resulted from a mere transposition from one solo instrument to another. Thus Bach used the Prelude of the Partita in E major for Solo Violin (BWV 1006) as the "Sinfonia" parts of two cantatas (BWV 29 and 120a) employing a relatively large orchestral body (three trumpets, kettledrums, two oboes, strings and basso continuo).


While the lute transcription of the Partita in E major, the Suite in E major for Lute (BWV 1006a), remains close to the original composition, the Suite in G minor for Lute (BWV 995) is an entirely different case; expressly named "Suite pour le Luth", it is based on the suite for Solo Cello in C minor (BWV 1011). In addition to the actual transposition, as found also in the mentioned cantata movements, Bach made use the considerably more extensive technique of lute playing in the polyphonic elaboration of the setting of his work. This becomes evident above all in the fughe passage of the Prelude whose imitative form of setting is only hinted at in the cello version.

Both the Partita for Violin and the Suite for Cello were created in 1720. The transpositions for lute, however, can be dated only approximately even through the autographs of these works still exist. To judge from the characters used (script) and from the watermarks, the Suite in G minor leads one to believe that it was composed between 1727 and 1731. The Suite in E major, which must date from the years between 1735 and 1740, was probably written by Bach when he was visited in Leipzig in July 1739 by the famous lutenist Silvius Leopold Weiss of Dresden.


Many sources from the 17th and 18th centuries attest to the historical practice of transcribing settings for the lute into guitar settings and vice versa. If today compositions for the lute by Bach are also, not to say primarily, played on the guitar, this practice was actually customary until late into the 18th century.


Source: Dr. Peter Benary (claves.ch)




Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

♪ 
Lute Suite No.4 in E major, BWV 1006a (1736-1737), arranged for guitar by Giacomo Susani


i. Prélude
ii. Loure
iii. Gavotte en Rondeau
iv. Menuett I
v. Menuett II
vi. Bourrée
vii. Gigue

Giacomo Susani, guitar


August 2015

(HD 1080p)















Giacomo Susani is an Italian guitarist (Padua, 29 April 1995). He started playing the guitar at the age of 7 and eventually studied under the direction of Stefano Grondona at the Conservatorio Arrigo Pedrollo in Vicenza where he graduated with the highest marks and honours in 2013. He is currently continuing his studies at the Royal Academy of Music in London, in the class of Michael Lewin, where he has completed his Bachelor of Music (2014-2016), gaining First Class Honours and the discretionary Bache Fund Prize and his Master of Arts (2016-2018), gaining High Distinction, Dip Ram for an outstanding final recital and Gershon Ellenbogen / Maccabaen Award; here is now studying his Advanced Diploma in Performance (2018-2019). On his entrance to the Academy he was awarded the prestigious Julian Bream Trust Scholarship, after an audition with Julian Bream himself.

Over the years he has taken part in masterclasses and attended advanced courses with leading guitarists such as Paul Galbraith, Oscar Ghiglia, David Russell, Carles Trepat, Fabio Zanon. In particular he obtained scholarships and diplomas of merit in Oscar Ghiglia's renewed guitar courses at the Accademica Musicale Chigiana in Siena.


He has regularly taken part in guitar competitions from an early age, always obtaining excellent results and, on many occasions, winning first prize. In October 2016 he won First Prize at the London International Guitar Competition playing on this occasion the premiere of Orpheus by Graham Lynch for guitar and orchestra. Among the most recent prizes are a Special Prize for the best performance of a newly commissioned piece at Guitar Masters Competition in Poland, 2nd Prize at Gianni Bergamo Classical Music Award in Switzerland and ESTA Prize for the best performance of a contemporary piece at Forum Gitarre Wien Competition, all of them awarded between September and November 2016.


In April 2017 he was awarded First Prize at the Ivor Mairants Guitar Award in London after which he became a Yeoman of The Musicians' Company. Shortly after, he won the Ian Fleming Award following an audition for Help Musicians UK as well as the Star Award of the Countess of Munster Musical Trust and First Prize at the David Russell Guitar Award. In July 2018 he won 2nd Prize at the 7th Changsha International Guitar Competition (China). In 2016 he was also selected by the International Guitar Foundation under their Young Artist Platform Scheme for a series of concerts across the UK and in 2018 as a "Young Star" for EuroStrings – European Guitar Festival Collaborative (the first European platform in the field of classical guitar gathering 14 classical guitar festivals that have a professional structure to enable further education and professional development of emerging guitar players): with this opportunity, he played and took masterclasses in most of European Festivals (Austria, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, Finland, Estonia, Holland).


As a performer he regularly appears in important venues in Italy and other countries as soloist, soloist with orchestra and in chamber ensembles, the most important venues including London, Cambridge, Canterbury, Bristol, Barcelona, Vienna, Milan, Padua, Venice, Budapest.


In February 2015 the recording studio Stradivarius brought out his first solo CD "Giacomo Susani plays Petrassi, Bach, Tansman, Weiss", which obtained excellent reviews from the public and critics alike published most notably in "BBC Music", "Gendai Guitar", "Il Fronimo", "Classical Guitar" and "Amadeus"; in 2016 he took part in a recording project J.S. Bach. The four suites for Lute, under the direction of Stefano Grondona, playing the "Suite 1006a"; in Autumn 2018 Stradivarius is publishing his second solo CD "Gebeth. Romantic music for Guitar. Mertz - Regondi".


In 2017 the Polish composer Marek Pasieczny dedicated to him his own solo guitar composition called Tate Sonata. Besides performing, he works in the field of composition, writing and premiering in London most recently Quintet for Guitar and Strings, Songs of Elegance and Wisdom for Soprano and Guitar and Of Dark Tales for two Guitars. Quintet and Songs of Elegance and Wisdom have been published by Armelin Musica (Padua, IT, 2017). He is also the Artistic Director of Momùs-More Music, a Musical Association based in Italy which promotes and organises classical music concerts.


Giacomo Susani plays a guitar made by the English luthier David Rubio (1996), a guitar made by the Spanish luthier Domingo Esteso (1926) and a guitar by the German luthier Matthias Dammann (2013) kindly provided by Calleva Foundation (London).


Giacomo is grateful for being kindly supported by the Julian Bream Trust, the Calleva Foundation, the Worshipful Company of Musicians, Help Musicians UK and The Countess of Munster Musical Trust.


Source: giacomosusani.com








































More photos


See also

Giacomo Susani – All the posts

Monday, September 17, 2018

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor – David Huang, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Manfred Honeck (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra under the baton of the Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck, the prize winning soloist David Huang performs Dmitri Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor, Op.35. Recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall, on May 24, 2018.



When Dmitri Shostakovich produced his Concerto No.1 in C minor for Piano, Trumpet and Strings, Op.35 in 1933, he was on top of the musical world in Russia. Not only that, but at age 27, he was already a composer of international renown, in the wake of the Symphony No.1: his glittering student masterpiece. In these post-revolutionary years, Soviet Musical culture was still sorting itself out, and Stalin's cultural goons had not yet begun their systematic terrorization of their nation's finest composers. Several years earlier, he had gotten a mild official "hand-slap" for his Tahiti Trot (his witty and whimsical take on "Tea for Two"), but the young genius was not to feel the regime's full wrath until Stalin and company viciously condemned his second opera, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, in 1936.

From then on, Shostakovich was forced to walk a tenuous artistic tightrope for the rest of his life, struggling to balance his creative integrity against the Kremlin's cultural dogma. But for now, his work – including two more regime-pleasing symphonies and his satirical opera The Nose (plus popular ballet, film and stage scores) had made him one of his country's musical darlings. And it was under such comparatively sunny circumstances that his first piano concerto came to sassy and vibrant life.


First performed in 1933 in Leningrad (St Petersburg) with the composer (also a brilliant pianist) at the keyboard, the work is full of burlesque swagger and impish, often sardonic humor. Even then, Shostakovich understood the official predilection for crude, even banal themes – but part of his genius was his ability to elevate the banal into the realm of art. And so it is often the case here, with a good bit of "common" musical material transformed into episodes of brain-teasing sophistication.


But there are quite a few instances of more exalted thematic material as well, owing to the composer's well-known habit of borrowing themes from other composers, as well as from his own works. Here, he both begins and ends the work with modified themes from Beethoven: the first movement's opening downward piano triad was apparently inspired by the opening bars of the "Appassionata" piano sonata, and the concluding frantic passages of the finale are based on his G major Rondo a Capriccio, popularly known as "Rage over a Lost Penny". In between, there are quotes from several of Shostakovich's earlier scores – and even a tid-bit from Haydn.


Following the first movement's brief opening bright splash, the initial Beethovenian theme tries to cast a somber overall mood – but Shostakovich doesn't let that happen, leading the theme instead into material more typical of a music-hall. The trumpet enters, with intermittent snippets reminiscent of jazzed-up military bugle calls. The original theme reappears here and there, tugging the music back and forth between serious and saucy. It should be noted that the trumpet has not yet become a full partner to the piano at this point, instead providing mostly irreverent musical "commentary" here and there. The mood changes abruptly in the following Lento movement, where the music – save for a dramatic and more animated central climax – takes on a consistently subdued and melancholy tone. The trumpet, now muted, enters fairly late in the movement, its pensive melodic musings adding to the prevailing reflective atmosphere.


The very short third movement – and airy episode of seemingly aimless piano noodling leading downward into a somberly throbbing strings passage – serves more as an interlude (or prelude) than a complete movement. But then comes the headlong finale, as the piano and strings explode into a frantic, carnival-atmosphere tumble. The trumpet – still not quite an equal partner to the piano – butts in repeatedly, as if goading the other musicians forward, until it gets its own gauche-sounding dance-tune. From there the musical chicanery piles up, with piano and trumpet seeming to compete as reluctant partners in crime. The final furious flurry of notes leaves the listener hanging on by the fingernails as the combined forces hurtle to a frantic finish.


Source: Lindsay Koob, 2013 (delosmusic.com)




Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

♪ Piano Concerto No.1 (Concerto for Piano, Trumpet and Strings) in C minor, Op.35 (1933)


i. Allegro moderato. Allegro vivace. Moderato

ii. Lento
iii. Moderato
iv. Allegro con brio. Presto. Allegretto poco moderato. Allegro con brio

David Huang, piano
Bengt Danielsson, trumpet

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Manfred Honeck


Encore:

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

♪ Jeux d'eau (1901)

David Huang, piano


Gothenburg Concert Hall, May 24, 2018

(HD 1080p)















As the winner of the Swedish Soloistprize in 2014, the foremost national competition for classical musicians; Swedish-Chinese pianist David Huang has established himself as one of scandinavias most interesting and prominent young musicians of today.

In 2012 David made his first breakthrough winning the prestigious Vera Lothar-Schevchenko international piano competition in Yekaterinburg. This made him the first swede ever to win a russian piano competiton. He performed in the finale two concertos of Mozart and Liszt together with the Ural Philharmonic Orchestra.

Appointed as Swedish Radio P2 Artist in Residence 2014-2016 David is making numerous recordings and live performances on both national television and radio, playing both solo, chamber music and with orchestras such as the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and Gävle Symphony Orchestra.

Today David is based in Stockholm, Sweden and enjoys performing both as a soloist and chamber musician. His passion and dedication for chamber music has led to many well established collaborations with some of scandinavia's finest musicians. As of 2015 he formed together with Swedish violinist Daniel Migdal and Norwegian cellist Frida Fredrikke Waaler Waervågen – Trio LEK, an ensemble dedicated to exploring contemporary music and also the already existing, vast repertoire. David is also a founding member of the chamber ensemble Sveriges Kammarsolister.

David was born 1988 in Taiyuan, China and moved to Sweden at the early age of three, he has already been awarded many honours, amongst them scholarships from the Royal Academy of Music in Sweden.

Source: davidhuang.se
















































More photos


See also


Anton Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Manfred Honeck (HD 1080p)

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor | Anton Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major – David Huang, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Manfred Honeck – Thursday, May 24, 2018, 07:30 PM CET – Livestream

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts

&

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor – Sergei Redkin, St Petersburg State Capella Symphony Orchestra, Alim Shakhmametyev (HD 1080p)

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.1 in C minor – Martha Argerich, David Guerrier, Verbier Festival Chamber Orchestra, Gábor Takács-Nagy

Dmitri Shostakovich – All the posts